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Julie by Catherine Marshall
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Julie (1984)

by Catherine Marshall

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8371116,371 (3.9)9
  1. 00
    The Johnstown Flood by David McCullough (dara85)
    dara85: Marshall used a lot of the details from the Johnstown Flood to create the flood in the fictional book, Julie.
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Senior year of high school, Julie's family uproots and moves to a new town, where her father has just invested their entire savings into a floundering newspaper. Town tensions are high between the "lowlanders" and the industrial big-wigs, with unionization threats, demanding better working conditions and higher wages in the slum-like steel mill workers. On top of it all, the dam holding back the man made lake above the town, threatens to spill it's banks.

In all of this, Julie is just a girl with high ideals, struggling with the changes, and writing in her journal. Since you're reading from her perspective, you get to observe her thoughts on everything from the eligible bachelors in town to her desire to write and expose the truth. She's naive, a troublemaker, and above all, extremely relate-able.

She and others in this book also struggle with many questions about God--how God allows bad things to happen to good people; how to have a personal relationship with God; what Christians are called to do about evil in the world. The young pastor in town represents the ideaology of the Social Gospel movement, which preached doing the works of Christ almost to the point where some believed that was entirely the way of salvation. Mr. Wallace (Julie's father) and Dean (a local Steel worker) balance out that way of thinking, showing that with a true relationship with God, He will call you to many ways of ministry. This depiction of inner-questioning in the book was extremely enlightening and leads readers in a way that is neither preachy nor didactic.

The story picks up slowly, and is the most interesting in the last two-thirds of the book, but the first part is essential for establishing the Wallace family background and that of the town. If you get stuck, push through, because this book is definitely worth reading.

In addition to everything happening with Julie's career as a newspaper journalist, the book also focuses on her potential suitors, at least four serious ones! Man, if only I was that popular in high school. Julie takes casual dating lightly, and declines most boys' offers to drive her up to Lookout Point for some "necking". Julie is a proper young girl but genuinely feels her human desires and there are a few kissing scenes that are quite intense. There are also several instances of bad language, but it is treated in a good way. Because of that and other factors, I would recommend this book to a Young Adult to Adult audience.
( )
  KatelynSBolds | Nov 12, 2018 |
Senior year of high school, Julie's family uproots and moves to a new town, where her father has just invested their entire savings into a floundering newspaper. Town tensions are high between the "lowlanders" and the industrial big-wigs, with unionization threats, demanding better working conditions and higher wages in the slum-like steel mill workers. On top of it all, the dam holding back the man made lake above the town, threatens to spill it's banks.

In all of this, Julie is just a girl with high ideals, struggling with the changes, and writing in her journal. Since you're reading from her perspective, you get to observe her thoughts on everything from the eligible bachelors in town to her desire to write and expose the truth. She's naive, a troublemaker, and above all, extremely relate-able.

She and others in this book also struggle with many questions about God--how God allows bad things to happen to good people; how to have a personal relationship with God; what Christians are called to do about evil in the world. The young pastor in town represents the ideaology of the Social Gospel movement, which preached doing the works of Christ almost to the point where some believed that was entirely the way of salvation. Mr. Wallace (Julie's father) and Dean (a local Steel worker) balance out that way of thinking, showing that with a true relationship with God, He will call you to many ways of ministry. This depiction of inner-questioning in the book was extremely enlightening and leads readers in a way that is neither preachy nor didactic.

The story picks up slowly, and is the most interesting in the last two-thirds of the book, but the first part is essential for establishing the Wallace family background and that of the town. If you get stuck, push through, because this book is definitely worth reading.

In addition to everything happening with Julie's career as a newspaper journalist, the book also focuses on her potential suitors, at least four serious ones! Man, if only I was that popular in high school. Julie takes casual dating lightly, and declines most boys' offers to drive her up to Lookout Point for some "necking". Julie is a proper young girl but genuinely feels her human desires and there are a few kissing scenes that are quite intense. There are also several instances of bad language, but it is treated in a good way. Because of that and other factors, I would recommend this book to a Young Adult to Adult audience. ( )
  KatelynSBolds | Nov 12, 2018 |
From the author of the beloved Christy, Julie explores the Great-Depression era, a flood-prone Pennsylvania town, and a struggling newspaper through the lense of an eighteen-year-old, spirited woman. In some ways, Julie’s story reflects Catherine Marshall’s own experiences, and I found it all, from start to finish, fascinating (even if the waffling between men became a bit tedious). It’s a story of family and faith, social justice and uncertainty, and it’s entirely lovely. I enjoyed reading it and look forward to revisiting it in the years to come. With a beautiful new cover for the re-released edition, Julie is a novel not to miss. I highly recommend it.

Thanks to JustRead Tours, I received a complimentary copy of Julie and the opportunity to provide an honest review. I was not required to write a positive review, and all the opinions I have expressed are my own. ( )
  hes7 | May 8, 2018 |
Oh, how I loved reading this book and walking in Julie Paige’s shoes, and what a kind, loving young woman the author has given us.
I have long been an admirer of Catherine Marshall, starting back as a teen when I read “A Man Called Peter”.
The author makes you feel for the injustice of big business, and the “I don’t care attitude”, and then then the bullying, all because you have concerns and disagree.
Warning once you start this you won’t be able to put it down, and have the tissues handy, there are some really sad parts, but you won’t regret reading this one.
I received this book through Just Read and the Publisher Evergreen Farm, and was not required to give a positive review. ( )
  alekee | Apr 27, 2018 |
There is nothing better for a reader than to feel like they have been swept into a time period and experience exactly what the characters are facing. This book has all the markings of an epic adventure that is captured by pure talent and focused details. I loved every minute I spent reading this wonderful story. I was transported back to 1935 and met a young woman so full of life, that I wanted to be friends with her. Julie is the heart beat of this story and will forever have a place of prominence in my heart of the true meaning of faith and perseverance.

I admired her for so many reasons. Her desire to be a journalist was so inspiring it reminds us to never give up on our dreams. I loved how she helped her dad at the newspaper doing whatever he asked her to do. Times were hard for the people in the town Julie's family moved to. There wasn't much money to survive on but the family never complained. I loved the compassion that was showed by several characters toward the needy and despondent families.

What really intrigued me was the vivid description of the steel mill. The employees worked long hours with little pay and Julie became interested in the inner workings of a huge company like the mill. I know the employees were mistreated but they had little power to do anything until talks of a union started spreading. I could see the groups gathering and agreeing that it was time to speak up.

This all leads up to a story that kept me glued to the pages as I read as fast as I could. It was no surprise that management wasn't happy with the newspaper when it seemed they were on the the opposite side of the owners. Danger lurks for Julie and her family as feathers get ruffled in the uproar of union talks. As this is going on, I could feel the tension build and knew something big was about to happen. I don't want to ruin the story for anyone, so I will say that the tragedy that happens will tear families apart, weave a destructive path to the town and forever change the lives of Alderton. The author captures the terror and pain with compassion and brought tears to my eyes as the event unfolded. It is evident that the author did much research to add to the historical value of the story and it heightened the book with precise information.

There is so much in this book that will have readers thinking and examining themselves. Are we still showing prejudice to others? Do we willingly lend a hand to our neighbors? Will we stand up for our beliefs no matter what? Thank you for writing a book that reminds us "to love one another as Christ loves the church."

I received a copy of this book from JustRead Publicity Tours. The review is my own opinion. ( )
  Harley0326 | Apr 25, 2018 |
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Dedication
To
the Wood-Marshall-LeSourd family
for thirty-four years of forbearance
and understanding and support
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As I stood on Lookout Point and viewed Alderton seven miles below, I wondered what changes I would find.
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0380698919, Mass Market Paperback)

Julie Wallace is just eighteen in 1934 when her father risks their life savings on a struggling newspaper and moves the family to a flood-prone Pennsylvania town.

It is here a young woman's convictions take firm root, as Julie finds herself taking sides when battle lines are drawn between desperate steelworkers and the mill owners who control their lives. And it is here where her heart and her loyalties are torn, divided between two special men. But when a devastating natural catastrophe becomes the ultimate test of courage and commitment, Julie's remarkable inner strength will come to the fore -- a strength born of faith and love.

And don't miss Catherine Marshall's beloved bestseller: Christy

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:21:29 -0400)

(see all 3 descriptions)

Julie Wallace, at 18, has the chance to write for her father's newspaper in Pennsylvania after they move from Alabama during the time of the steel magnates.

» see all 2 descriptions

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