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Bad Blood: Secrets and Lies in a Silicon…
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Bad Blood: Secrets and Lies in a Silicon Valley Startup (edition 2018)

by John Carreyrou (Author)

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1,366999,773 (4.27)74
"The full inside story of the breathtaking rise and shocking collapse of a multibillion-dollar startup, by the prize-winning journalist who first broke the story and pursued it to the end in the face of pressure and threats from the CEO and her lawyers. In 2014, Theranos founder and CEO Elizabeth Holmes was widely seen as the female Steve Jobs: a brilliant Stanford dropout whose startup "unicorn" promised to revolutionize the medical industry with a machine that would make blood tests significantly faster and easier. Backed by investors such as Larry Ellison and Tim Draper, Theranos sold shares in a fundraising round that valued the company at $9 billion, putting Holmes's worth at an estimated $4.7 billion. There was just one problem: The technology didn't work. For years, Holmes had been misleading investors, FDA officials, and her own employees. When Carreyrou, working at The Wall Street Journal, got a tip from a former Theranos employee and started asking questions, both Carreyrou and the Journal were threatened with lawsuits. Undaunted, the newspaper ran the first of dozens of Theranos articles in late 2015. By early 2017, the company's value was zero and Holmes faced potential legal action from the government and her investors. Here is the riveting story of the biggest corporate fraud since Enron, a disturbing cautionary tale set amid the bold promises and gold-rush frenzy of Silicon Valley"--"The full inside story of the breathtaking rise and shocking collapse of Theranos--the Enron of Silicon Valley--by the prize-winning journalist who first broke the story and pursued it to the end in the face of pressure and threats from the CEO and her lawyers. In 2014, Theranos founder and CEO Elizabeth Holmes was widely seen as the female Steve Jobs: a brilliant Stanford dropout whose startup "unicorn" promised to revolutionize the medical industry with a machine that would make blood tests significantly faster and easier. Backed by investors such as Larry Ellison and Tim Draper, Theranos sold shares in an early fundraising round that valued the company at $9 billion, putting Holmes's worth at an estimated $4.7 billion. There was just one problem: the technology didn't work. For years, Holmes had been misleading investors, FDA officials, and her own employees. When Carreyrou, working at the Wall Street Journal, got a tip from a former Theranos employee and started asking questions, both Carreyrou and the Journal were threatened with lawsuits. Undaunted, the newspaper ran the first of dozens of Theranos articles in late 2015. By early 2017, the company's value was zero and Holmes faced potential legal action from the government and her investors. Here is the riveting story of the biggest corporate fraud since Enron, a disturbing cautionary tale set amid the bold promises and gold-rush frenzy of Silicon Valley"--… (more)
Member:equanimity23
Title:Bad Blood: Secrets and Lies in a Silicon Valley Startup
Authors:John Carreyrou (Author)
Info:Knopf (2018), Edition: 1, 352 pages
Collections:Your library
Rating:****
Tags:year-2019, nonfiction, science, technology

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Bad Blood: Secrets and Lies in a Silicon Valley Startup by John Carreyrou

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» See also 74 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 97 (next | show all)
I wish this book had not been so good.

I lied to myself about “one more chapter” at 1:30am so many times that I had to take to afternoon naps to get through the day following.

Do I regret it? not a bit!

I had to keep reminding myself that this was non-fiction because it was as exciting as even the best detective stories I’ve read of late. The narrative sets a heady pace that never lets up and just when you think that this must run out of steam soon, it ratchets up even more!

Laying bare the venal greed that underlies so much of American capitalism, not only in the production of wealth but the dream of wealth too. And running along beside it the amoral forces of darkness that have no hesitation in destroying people’s lives in order to make that buck. What always surprises me is how much of that is considered normal.

The story in essence is one of wishful thinking by people, of no doubt decent character (except for Kissinger) who can be classified, by the old words, as blinded in the way that only those who choose not to see can be blind.

We are reminded pretty much daily of the face of evil that Silicon Valley has become, we used to think that Facebook was bad, but it took Donald Trump to show us how Silicon Valley sheds only crocodile tears. Black Lives Matter as long as they do not endanger profits.

This book lives in its entirety in that amoral quagmire.

Reading this book will let you see that justice can prevail, but only by the slimmest of odds and not without great effort by the opposing forces.

Sheer brilliance. ( )
  Ken-Me-Old-Mate | Sep 24, 2020 |
My first aloud exclamation of “Oh my God” came on page 7, and my exclamations and head-shaking disbelief continued for the next 300 pages of this juicy page-turner about the Theranos implosion. Since the company’s downfall has been featured in a series of news stories over the course of the last few years, there is no real spoiler alert here. Yet, Carreyrou manages to serve up an endless supply of tantalizingly scandalous behind-the-scenes details as he drills down on the finer points of this stranger-than-fiction true story about a blood-testing company run by an impressive visionary who lacked the technical knowledge or leadership skills to successfully execute her ideas. At the book’s halfway point, it seems there cannot possibly be any conceivable way that Theranos could still continue its business operations, but more surprises abound as the author deftly unspools the tale of how Theranos got away with its shenanigans for so long.
Densely but tidily packed with material, this is by no means a light read. Nevertheless, Carreyrou skillfully weaves intriguing tidbits into the dearth of facts to keep the reader enthralled, whether he is discussing the science of blood testing (which Carreyrou mercifully distills into layman’s terms) or sketching a snapshot of Theranos’s headquarters in Silicon Valley (which Carreyrou expertly crafts as its own separate, lifelike character, fueled by raw ambition and nepotism).
One of the best books I read in 2018, this book will leave you breathless, and will have your blood boiling. ( )
  JodiS | Sep 18, 2020 |
This was a good read! Only watched a couple of videos on this case on YouTube and didn't know the specifics of it till I read this. If you want to know the full length story of how a woman basically scammed a whole bunch of rich old men, read this book. As I read each chapter, the more gripping it gets. You'll read about how the company skyrocketed in Silicon Valley and how it crashed hard at the end of its life when the FDA did a surprise inspection at Theranos's lab.

I'll suggest that you watch the HBO documentary too, it gives a nice visual companion to the book. ( )
  nikkiyrj | Sep 18, 2020 |
I could not put this down! It's so interesting. ( )
  SSBranham | Sep 17, 2020 |
Really interesting and well-researched story. Listening to the audiobook was good because there were a lot of dry facts and many names that I didn’t have to try to remember like I would reading, so that helped. It would have been cool to try to get into her head to figure out WTF, but I guess that’s difficult for a sociopath/narcissist like Elizabeth Holmes. ( )
  spinsterrevival | Sep 9, 2020 |
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"The full inside story of the breathtaking rise and shocking collapse of a multibillion-dollar startup, by the prize-winning journalist who first broke the story and pursued it to the end in the face of pressure and threats from the CEO and her lawyers. In 2014, Theranos founder and CEO Elizabeth Holmes was widely seen as the female Steve Jobs: a brilliant Stanford dropout whose startup "unicorn" promised to revolutionize the medical industry with a machine that would make blood tests significantly faster and easier. Backed by investors such as Larry Ellison and Tim Draper, Theranos sold shares in a fundraising round that valued the company at $9 billion, putting Holmes's worth at an estimated $4.7 billion. There was just one problem: The technology didn't work. For years, Holmes had been misleading investors, FDA officials, and her own employees. When Carreyrou, working at The Wall Street Journal, got a tip from a former Theranos employee and started asking questions, both Carreyrou and the Journal were threatened with lawsuits. Undaunted, the newspaper ran the first of dozens of Theranos articles in late 2015. By early 2017, the company's value was zero and Holmes faced potential legal action from the government and her investors. Here is the riveting story of the biggest corporate fraud since Enron, a disturbing cautionary tale set amid the bold promises and gold-rush frenzy of Silicon Valley"--"The full inside story of the breathtaking rise and shocking collapse of Theranos--the Enron of Silicon Valley--by the prize-winning journalist who first broke the story and pursued it to the end in the face of pressure and threats from the CEO and her lawyers. In 2014, Theranos founder and CEO Elizabeth Holmes was widely seen as the female Steve Jobs: a brilliant Stanford dropout whose startup "unicorn" promised to revolutionize the medical industry with a machine that would make blood tests significantly faster and easier. Backed by investors such as Larry Ellison and Tim Draper, Theranos sold shares in an early fundraising round that valued the company at $9 billion, putting Holmes's worth at an estimated $4.7 billion. There was just one problem: the technology didn't work. For years, Holmes had been misleading investors, FDA officials, and her own employees. When Carreyrou, working at the Wall Street Journal, got a tip from a former Theranos employee and started asking questions, both Carreyrou and the Journal were threatened with lawsuits. Undaunted, the newspaper ran the first of dozens of Theranos articles in late 2015. By early 2017, the company's value was zero and Holmes faced potential legal action from the government and her investors. Here is the riveting story of the biggest corporate fraud since Enron, a disturbing cautionary tale set amid the bold promises and gold-rush frenzy of Silicon Valley"--

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