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Glory in Their Spirit: How Four Black Women…
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Glory in Their Spirit: How Four Black Women Took On the Army during World… (edition 2018)

by Sandra M Bolzenius (Author)

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"In 1945, four African American female privates who were members of the Women's Army Corps (WAC) participated in a strike at Fort Devens, Massachusetts, and opted to take a court martial rather than accept discriminatory work assignments. As the army prepared for the court-martial and civil rights activists investigated the circumstances, competing commentaries in African American and mainstream newspapers ignited a passionate public response across the country. Indeed, the insurrection, now little remembered, became the most publicized and recorded protest of Black WACs during World War II as story of how four African American women pushed the army's segregation system to its breaking point. Drawing on relevant scholarship, archival work, newspaper responses to the strike, and interviews with the strikers or their families, Sandra Bolzenius shows how the strike at Ft. Devens demonstrates that army regulations prioritized white men, segregated African Americans, highlighted white women's femininity, and overlooked the presence of African American women. In drawing attention to these issues, this book is able to shed light on the experiences and agency of World War II Black WACs who resisted racial discrimination and asserted their entitlements as female military personnel, analyze military policies and their effects on Army personnel, particularly Black WACs, and investigate the Army's determination to maintain the existing social order through the strict segmentation of its troops based on race, gender, and rank."--Provided by publisher.… (more)
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Title:Glory in Their Spirit: How Four Black Women Took On the Army during World War II (Women, Gender, and Sexuality in American History)
Authors:Sandra M Bolzenius (Author)
Info:University of Illinois Press (2018), 248 pages
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Glory in Their Spirit: How Four Black Women Took On the Army during World War II (Women in American History) by Sandra M Bolzenius

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Title: Glory in Their Spirit
Author: Sandra M. Bolzenius
Publisher: University of Illinois Press
Reviewed By: Arlena Dean
Rating: Five
Review:

"Glory in Their Spirit" How Four Black Women Took On the Army[WAC] during World War II by Sandra M Bolzenius

My Thoughts...

I found this read "Glory in Their Spirit: How Four Black Women Took On the Army during World War II a interesting read of 'black service women during WWII here in America. I also found the prayer very befitting the read especially after reading of this entire read. I will say that this book still made me shake my head at what one had to go through to wear a uniform...still having to give up their seats with other quotes this author presented. All in all Black people in uniform 'wanted nothing more than to be treated as equal by all people. I read this novel thinking even though in the 1940's segregation and discrimination was high with African American women definitely not being equal to well who? I found myself after reading this wondering just how hard it was for these four African American women to be in the service of the 'army [WAC] but not good enough but only to be able to clean after others [working as orderlies] while the white group had no problem.' Why not better jobs since it seemed like these 'four women were good enough to do their part and be able to get in the army[WAC] in the first place?'

Well, all is left for me to say...Look At Us Now! I am not sure I liked this novel at first however after much thought I see that this author did wonderful job writing this story and hopefully it will help one understand what African American women in uniform serving in this US of America Army [WAC] had to go through...so 'GLORY IN THEIR SPIRIT.' Even though in the end we find 'Green, Morrison, Murphy and Young had to chose court-martial over a return to menial duties' which 'helped steer one of Americana's most powerful institutions onto a new road toward progress and justice.' Amen to that!

Yes, I am a African American woman and it cuts in my spirit to what these four woman had to endure in order to serve our country. I find this is a interesting read only if you are interested in what have gone on in the past to what is now going on in the present. Things have changed..thank God for that! ( )
  arlenadean | Apr 16, 2018 |
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"In 1945, four African American female privates who were members of the Women's Army Corps (WAC) participated in a strike at Fort Devens, Massachusetts, and opted to take a court martial rather than accept discriminatory work assignments. As the army prepared for the court-martial and civil rights activists investigated the circumstances, competing commentaries in African American and mainstream newspapers ignited a passionate public response across the country. Indeed, the insurrection, now little remembered, became the most publicized and recorded protest of Black WACs during World War II as story of how four African American women pushed the army's segregation system to its breaking point. Drawing on relevant scholarship, archival work, newspaper responses to the strike, and interviews with the strikers or their families, Sandra Bolzenius shows how the strike at Ft. Devens demonstrates that army regulations prioritized white men, segregated African Americans, highlighted white women's femininity, and overlooked the presence of African American women. In drawing attention to these issues, this book is able to shed light on the experiences and agency of World War II Black WACs who resisted racial discrimination and asserted their entitlements as female military personnel, analyze military policies and their effects on Army personnel, particularly Black WACs, and investigate the Army's determination to maintain the existing social order through the strict segmentation of its troops based on race, gender, and rank."--Provided by publisher.

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