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West of Kabul, East of New York: An Afghan…
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West of Kabul, East of New York: An Afghan American Story

by Tamim Ansary

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i really enjoyed this memoir by tamim ansary, who was a regular when i worked at dog eared books and is a really nice guy as well as a terrific writer.

if you want it, email me & i'll mail it to you. ( )
  anderlawlor | Apr 9, 2013 |
Excellent perspective of Afghan American regarding the WTC attacks of 911/ ( )
  rharrisonblack | Dec 28, 2010 |
Fasinating book on the intracacies of an Iranian living in the US. Found his attention to detail and story telling a perfect match. Would recommend this to anyone. ( )
  bluesviola | Jun 20, 2009 |
An insightful, illuminating personal narrative of a man born in prewar Afghanistan who emigrated to the US at the age of 16. While the impetus of the book was September 11 and a now famous email that Ansary kicked off to a few friends to describe his feelings as he reeled from the immediate aftermath, the book is centrally about identity, the author's struggle to find it, and his anxiety about the rise of fundamentalist Islam. ( )
  BudaBaby | Jun 15, 2007 |
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0312421516, Paperback)

The day after the World Trade Center was destroyed, Tamim Ansary sent an anguished e-mail to twenty friends, discussing the attack from his perspective as an Afghan American. The message reached millions. Born to an Afghan father and American mother, Ansary grew up in the intimate world of Afghan family life and emigrated to San Francisco thinking he’d left Afghan culture behind forever. At the height of the Iranian Revolution, however, he took a harrowing journey through the Islamic world, and in the years that followed, he struggled to unite his divided self and to find a place in his imagination where his Afghan and American identities might meet.

(retrieved from Amazon Mon, 30 Sep 2013 13:30:09 -0400)

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"Born to an Afghan father and American mother, Tamim Ansary grew up in the intimate world of Afghan family life and emigrated to San Francisco thinking he'd left Afghan culture behind forever. At the height of the Iranian Revolution, however, he took a harrowing journey through the Islamic world, and in the years that followed, he struggled to unite his divided self and to find a place in his imagination where his Afghan and American identities might meet. The day after the World Trade Center was destroyed, he sent an anguished e-mail to twenty friends, discussing the attack from his perspective as an Afghan American. The message was the culmination of his lifelong struggle, and it reached millions. West of Kabul, East of New York is his story"--Cover, p. 4.… (more)

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