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The South Was Right! (1991)

by James Ronald Kennedy, Walter Donald Kennedy

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1893106,180 (3.77)2
An authoritative and documented study of the mythology behind Civil War history, clearly exhibiting how the South was an independent country invaded, captured, and still occupied by a vicious aggressor.

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This is a very good book. I wish I had read it when it was first published. This should be mandatory reading in all American History Courses. ( )
  Philip100 | Oct 28, 2016 |
I found this to be an interesting book. There are many facts in here which condemn the North for its' invasion of a foreign country. I agree with much of this. The facts are laid out nicely, and are hard to disprove. However, this book has one major weakness. This book does not restrict itself solely to the facts. The authors write this book with two purposes in mind. The first is to show that the South was right, and the South seceded legally, and the North violated a sovereign country. It does a good job of meeting this goal. The other intent of the authors is to portray the North as evil. This is not restricted to the time of the Civil War. The North has been evil since before the Founding, and it is still evil. Not only that, but it seems like virtually all Northerners are evil. This is pure emotion. They do not make a good case for this. If they had stuck to the facts, showing the rights of the South, this would be an excellent book. Still read it, just do so with a grain, or two, of salt. ( )
1 vote torrey23 | Jul 13, 2013 |
It single-handedly balances the one-sided story I learned in school (while in no way arguing for slavery). ( )
3 vote jpsnow | Apr 26, 2008 |
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James Ronald Kennedyprimary authorall editionscalculated
Kennedy, Walter Donaldmain authorall editionsconfirmed
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No other war or event has captivated the imagination of the American public as the events known as the American "Civil War."  (Preface)
There are still those of us who can recall the days when the playing of "Dixie" at football games and at the close of the radio broadcast day was commonplace.  (Chapter 1)
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An authoritative and documented study of the mythology behind Civil War history, clearly exhibiting how the South was an independent country invaded, captured, and still occupied by a vicious aggressor.

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