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The Adventures of Tom Sawyer by Mark Twain
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The Adventures of Tom Sawyer (original 1876; edition 2003)

by Mark Twain, Patrick Fraley (Narrator)

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Member:mellowyellow
Title:The Adventures of Tom Sawyer
Authors:Mark Twain
Other authors:Patrick Fraley (Narrator)
Info:BBC Audiobooks America (2003), Edition: Unabridged, Audio CD
Collections:Your library
Rating:****
Tags:American, read 2013, kindle, amazon

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The Adventures of Tom Sawyer by Mark Twain (1876)

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Showing 1-5 of 168 (next | show all)
For Christmas, I ordered an mp3 player (Library of Classics) that was pre-loaded with 100 works of classic literature in an audio format. Each work is in the public domain and is read by amateurs, so the quality of the presentation is hit or miss.

The Adventures of Tom Sawyer is a classic piece of 19th century literature penned by Mark Twain. It recounts several adventures in the life of a young, Missouri boy living in a small town on the Mississippi River. While it is at times amusing, the rural, 19th century slang and extremely superstitious beliefs of many of the characters, explained at length, soon becomes tiresome and annoying. Taken in small doses, the escapades of Sawyer and his compatriot Huck Finn can be tolerable, but combined in book length form, they soon lose their charm. ( )
  santhony | Nov 14, 2014 |
It seems somehow irreverant to dislike a classic that's so, well, classic, as Tom Sawyer. In fact I only disliked the first half. When Tom and his friends really embark on their adventures, it becomes a great story.

It could be partly cultural. English kids don't do many American classics at school, well, we certainly didn't, and although I can relate to 1830s life through other tales, films and programmes, it doesn't mean I'm at ease with them. I didn't feel that Tom's school adventures were told well. It was difficult to understand the voices of the characters, the idioms and accents. Maybe because of that, I found it hard to distinguish between the young people. Long passages of dialogue between Tom and Huckleberry Finn, for example, became just dialogue with no clear understanding of who was talking.

This changed when Tom went on his adventures. The power of the writing drew you into the scene, the hardships, the danger, imagined or not. Some of Tom's antics are cringeworthy but eventually he and his friends become embroiled in serious danger, however lightly they started out. But I felt Tom's 'voice' changed. Over the course of one summer he went from seemingly a 12 year old to a 15-16 year old. I know some kids that did that. But it was odd.

So, do I think The Adventures of Tom Sawyer worthy of its accolades, worthy of being classed as one of the greatest classics? Yes and no. Written in 1876, it is a powerful and evocative telling of an era some thirty or forty years earlier. As a picture of a medium sized town and its characters, as an adventure story, it works and works well. By the time I'd finished it, I was enjoying it. It took me a while, though.

I'm glad I've read it, but I don't think I'd read another. ( )
  Jemima_Pett | Nov 11, 2014 |
Twain's bold themes are wonderfully depicted in this novel where Tom gets into all sorts of mischief. I love Twain's literary style and humor. Worth reading it at least once, if not more. ( )
  Rosenstern | Sep 14, 2014 |
i absolutely loved it! ( )
  Platicorn | Sep 6, 2014 |
http://nwhyte.livejournal.com/2340216.html

I had forgotten how episodic it is, but it adds up to a sympathetic portrayal of a community from the point of view of a teenager whose active imagination sometimes spills over into reality with dramatic effect. High points for comedy are the two particularly religion-related scenes, the sermon and rthe prize for Biblical knowledge; for human drama, there are the two occasions where Tom's wandering off base, to the island or to the caves, has serious real-world impacts. I'm a bit surprised that it's generally remembered as a book for children; it seems more like a book intended to be read aloud by adults in a family setting. ( )
  nwhyte | Sep 5, 2014 |
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» Add other authors (152 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Twain, Markprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Baender, PaulEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Brockway, HarryIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Brooks, BruceForewordsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
DeVoto, BernardEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Dietz, NormanNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Dufris, WilliamNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Fraley, PatrickNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Gardner, GroverNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
George, Jean CraigheadIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Gerber, John C.Forewordsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Hagon, GarrickNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Hill, DickNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Kazin, AlfredAfterwordsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Laine, JarkkoTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
McKay, DonaldIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
McKowen, ScottIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Minton, HaroldIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Powers, Richard M.Illustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Rockwell, NormanIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed

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To MY WIFE, this book is affectionately dedicated
First words
"TOM!" No answer."TOM!" No answer. "What's gone with that boy, I wonder? You TOM!" No answer.
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
This is the main work for The Adventures of Tom Sawyer. Please do not combine it with any adaptation, abridgement, etc.

The ISBN 1402714602 is for the Sterling Publishing Unabridged Classics edtion of Tom Sawyer.
If you own a film edition belonging to this work, please consider specifying the director. If you own a book edition, please consider specifying the author.
ISBN 0528823663 is a Rand McNally Illustrated Edition of Tom Sawyer.
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Book description
Tom Sawyer is about a young mischievous boy who has many adventures. This story is about boyhood and growing up. Although some of the adventures can become very serious, this story is filled with humorous situations.  I enjoyed this book because it made me laugh and it's is just an all around fun story to read.
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0143039563, Paperback)

From the famous episodes of the whitewashed fence and the ordeal in the cave to the trial of Injun Joe, The Adventures of Tom Sawyer is redolent of life in the Mississippi River towns in which Twain spent his own youth. A somber undercurrent flows through the high humor and unabashed nostalgia of the novel, however, for beneath the innocence of childhood lie the inequities of adult reality—base emotions and superstitions, murder and revenge, starvation and slavery. In his introduction, noted Twain scholar John Seelye considers Twain’s impact on American letters and discusses the balance between humorous escapades and serious concern that is found in much of Twain’s writing.

This new edition includes a new text and, for the first time, explanatory notes

(retrieved from Amazon Mon, 30 Sep 2013 13:42:03 -0400)

(see all 8 descriptions)

A boy in the river town of Hannibal, Missouri runs off and has a lot of adventures.

(summary from another edition)

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Audible.com

36 editions of this book were published by Audible.com.

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Penguin Australia

Four editions of this book were published by Penguin Australia.

Editions: 0143039563, 0141321105, 0141808748, 0141194936

The Library of America

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University of California Press

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