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The Rest of the Story by Sarah Dessen
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The Rest of the Story (edition 2019)

by Sarah Dessen (Author)

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1149161,997 (4.24)5
Emma Saylor doesn't remember a lot about her mother, who died when Emma was twelve. But she does remember the stories her mom told her about the big lake that went on forever, with cold, clear water and mossy trees at the edges. Now it's just Emma and her dad, and life is good, if a little predictable ... until Emma is unexpectedly sent to spend the summer with her mother's family that she hasn't seen since she was a little girl. When Emma arrives at North Lake, she realizes there are actually two very different communities there. Her mother grew up in working class North Lake, while her dad spent summers in the wealthier Lake North resort. The more time Emma spends there, the more it starts to feel like she is also divided into two people. To her father, she is Emma. But to her new family, she is Saylor, the name her mother always called her. Then there's Roo, the boy who was her very best friend when she was little. Roo holds the key to her family's history, and slowly, he helps her put the pieces together about her past. It's hard not to get caught up in the magic of North Lake--and Saylor finds herself falling under Roo's spell as well. For Saylor, it's like a whole new world is opening up to her. But when it's time to go back home, which side of her--Emma or Saylor--will win out?… (more)
Member:WiscassetPL
Title:The Rest of the Story
Authors:Sarah Dessen (Author)
Info:Balzer Bray (2019), 448 pages
Collections:Adult and YA
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The Rest of the Story by Sarah Dessen

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Showing 1-5 of 9 (next | show all)
Review: The Rest of the Story by Sarah Dessen

Here is a summary of what the book is about. Emma Saylor doesn’t remember a lot about her mother, who died when Emma was twelve. But she does remember the stories her mom told her about the big lake that went on forever, with cold, clear water and mossy trees at the edges.
Now it’s just Emma and her dad, and life is good, if a little predictable…until Emma is unexpectedly sent to spend the summer with her mother’s family that she hasn’t seen since she was a little girl.
When Emma arrives at North Lake, she realizes there are actually two very different communities there. Her mother grew up in working class North Lake, while her dad spent summers in the wealthier Lake North resort. The more time Emma spends there, the more it starts to feel like she is also divided into two people. To her father, she is Emma. But to her new family, she is Saylor, the name her mother always called her.
Then there’s Roo, the boy who was her very best friend when she was little. Roo holds the key to her family’s history, and slowly, he helps her put the pieces together about her past. It’s hard not to get caught up in the magic of North Lake—and Saylor finds herself falling under Roo’s spell as well.
For Saylor, it’s like a whole new world is opening up to her. But when it’s time to go back home, which side of her—Emma or Saylor—will win out?

I enjoyed reading this book. I found it to be interesting. I thought the book was written very well. This is the first book I have read of Sarah Dessen.

I am looking forward to reading more books by this author.

Happy Reading Everyone! ( )
  ErinAyin | Sep 20, 2019 |
When her plans to stay at her friend while her father and his new wife take their honeymoon fall through, the only place for Emma Saylor Payne to go is to her mother's family on a lake. The last time Emma was there was 13 years ago when she was four when she stayed for two weeks. There she was known as Saylor, not Emma. Her grandmother, Mimi, who owns a motel, told the family that Emma was on vacation and leave her alone...and alone was what she was, while the rest of the family ran the motel and did other jobs in town.

Her dad never talked much about her mother who was addicted to alcohol and drugs. He was always trying to protect her. Now, among her estranged family, the story of that family side comes out slowly but surely as she remembers details of her last visit and everyone else fills in the blanks.

This is a little different for Sarah Dessen, but actually somewhat more meaningful than many of her past books. It is totally enjoyable. My only criticism is that Emma is so placid when it comes to her dad dictating what she can and cannot do---as a seventeen year old, I'd imagine she'd be a bit more rebellious. But, criticism aside, I really like the book and its characters. ( )
  EdGoldberg | Sep 9, 2019 |
I would give it 3 1/2 stars because I thought that the book wrapped up too neatly. All of the differences and issues between the two sides of Emma's family and the things that Emma Saylor was learning and thinking about in terms of privilege and class divisions were ignored in a rush to a feel good ending. I was left wanting to know how the families really interacted when they were forced to spend time together and how Emma's father got over his prejudices against Emma Saylor's other family and new friends. I thought that the book raised interesting issues about wealth and privilege and how that affects relationships even between people of the same race and then failed to follow through which was frustrating. ( )
  SGKowalski | Aug 28, 2019 |
Emma Saylor doesn't remember a lot about her mother, who died when Emma was twelve. But she does remember the stories her mom told her about the big lake that went on forever, with cold, clear water and mossy trees at the edges. Now it's just Emma and her dad, and life is good, if a little predictable—until Emma is unexpectedly sent to spend the summer with her mother's family which she hasn't seen since she was a little girl. When Emma arrives at North Lake, she realizes there are actually two very different communities there. Her mother grew up in working class North Lake, while her dad spent summers in the wealthier Lake North resort. The more time Emma spends there, the more she feels she is also divided. To her father, she is Emma. But to her new family, she is Saylor, the name her mother always called her. Then there's Roo, the boy who was her very best friend when she was little. Roo holds the key to her family's history, and slowly, he helps her put the pieces together about her past. It's hard not to get caught up in the magic of North Lake, and Saylor finds herself falling under Roo's spell as well. For Saylor, it's like a whole new world is opening up to her. But when it's time to go back home, which side of her—Emma or Saylor—will win? ( )
  ShellyPYA | Jul 25, 2019 |
The summer Emma Saylor is seventeen, her dad has just remarried (she couldn't be happier for him) and her mother died several years ago after battling painkiller addiction and alcoholism. The plan is for her to stay with her friend, but when that can't happen she has to make a last minute switch and visit her mother's side of the family on Lake North for three weeks. But what started out as an inconvenience may turn out to be just what Emma - or maybe Saylor - needs to discover herself.

Sarah Dessen's stories have become summer for me just like Elin Hildebrand is for many of my adult patrons. Her teen girls coming of age are go-to reads of mine ever since grad school in 2007-08. But I'm starting to see a subtle shift in my reading now that I'm closer in age to the parents (in this one they were four years older than me) than the teens. In fact, I probably would've related to it a lot at the age of 17, because a lot of the self-discovery Emma goes through is learning that she can test the boundaries and not just be the good kid. This one fell a little flat for me, and I'm not quite sure why. ( )
  bell7 | Jul 7, 2019 |
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