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The Life and Adventures of Nicholas Nickleby (Household Edition. The Works… (original 1836; edition 1875)

by Charles Dickens

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
4,457581,100 (3.95)211
Member:aluvalibri
Title:The Life and Adventures of Nicholas Nickleby (Household Edition. The Works of Charles Dickens)
Authors:Charles Dickens
Info:Harper & Brothers (1875), Hardcover
Collections:Your library
Rating:*****
Tags:literature, 19th century, Britain, R7/07

Work details

Nicholas Nickleby by Charles Dickens (1836)

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    souloftherose: Both books are early Dickens' novels and written in an episodic, picaresque style. Although Nicholas Nickleby is more plot-driven than The Pickwick Papers and contains some darker themes, both works are fundamentally happy Dickens novels and readers who enjoy one would probably enjoy the other.… (more)
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Book Description
One of the touchstones of the English comic novel, the Penguin Classics edition of Charles Dickens's Nicholas Nickleby is edited with an introduction by Mark Ford. When Nicholas Nickleby is left penniless after his father's death, he appeals to his wealthy uncle to help him find work and to protect his mother and sister. But Ralph Nickleby proves both hard-hearted and unscrupulous, and Nicholas finds himself forced to make his own way in the world. His adventures gave Dickens the opportunity to portray an extraordinary gallery of rogues and eccentrics: Wackford Squeers, the tyrannical headmaster of Dotheboys Hall, a school for unwanted boys, the slow-witted orphan Smike, rescued by Nicholas, the pretentious Mantalinis and the gloriously theatrical Mr and Mrs Crummels and their daughter, the 'infant phenomenon'. Like many of Dickens's novels, Nicholas Nickleby is characterised by his outrage at cruelty and social injustice, but it is also a flamboyantly exuberant work, whose loose, haphazard progress harks back to the picaresque novels of Tobias Smollett and Henry Fielding. In his introduction Mark Ford compares Nicholas Nickleby to eighteenth-century picaresque novels, and examines Dickens's criticism of the 'Yorkshire schools', his social satire and use of language. This edition includes the original illustrations by 'Phiz', Dickens's original preface to the work, a chronology and a list of further reading. Charles Dickens is one of the best-loved novelists in the English language, whose 200th anniversary was celebrated in 2012. His most famous books, including Oliver Twist, Great Expectations, A Tale of Two Cities, David Copperfield and The Pickwick Papers, have been adapted for stage and screen and read by millions. If you enjoyed Nicholas Nickleby, you might like Dickens's David Copperfield, also available in Penguin Classics. 'The novel has everything: an absorbing melodrama, with a supporting cast of heroes, villains and eccentrics, set in a London where vast wealth and desperate poverty live cheek-by-jowl' Jasper Rees, The Times

My Review
I found Nicholas Nickelby to be a very entertaining book with lots of humor. It is a long book but holds your attention because of the quirky characters that Dickens is noted for. In Nicholas Nickelby, Dickens is showing us the social injustice mainly to children. The theme of good vs. evil is also very prevalent but in the end good is victorious and the novel finishes with the characters living happily ever after. I would recommend this novel to anyone who is interested in reading about Victorian England. ( )
  eadieburke | Jan 19, 2016 |
I found Nicholas Nickelby to be a very entertaining book with lots of humor. It is a long book but holds your attention because of the quirky characters that Dickens is noted for. In Nicholas Nickelby, Dickens is showing us the social injustice mainly to children. The theme of good vs. evil is also very prevalent but in the end good is victorious and the novel finishes with the characters living happily ever after. I would recommend this novel to anyone who is interested in reading about Victorian England. ( )
  eadieburke | Jan 19, 2016 |
The Life and Adventures of Nicholas Nickleby by Charles Dickens
4 stars

After the death of their father, Nicholas Nickleby, his sister, Kate, and their mother move to London in the hopes that their uncle Ralph will help them find the means of supporting themselves. Ralph Nickleby, however, is your typical Dickensesque money-hungry jerk, so that doesn’t work out too well for anyone. After a series of adventures that reads very much like a modern soap opera, almost everyone who deserves to lives happily ever after, and almost everyone who doesn’t deserve to, doesn’t.

This novel contains all the characteristics of the typical Dickens work: a plot that revolves around a young person who has to overcome multiple obstacles in order to succeed, commentary on the plight of the English working class, and a few well-placed hilarious characters. For a while I thought that this would be my favorite Dickens book yet, and it may still be, but I haven’t quite decided yet. Somewhere around page 600 I really started to feel like it was dragging on too long, and I still think Dickens could have cut a couple hundred pages out. However, the last hundred pages really picked up again, which helped considerably. Mrs. Nickleby is a fantastic character; although her long, rambling monologues get annoying at times, she is absolutely hilarious. My edition was 846 pages, so it may be a little long for someone who isn’t that interested in Dickens, but I really enjoyed most of the book. ( )
  AmandaL. | Jan 16, 2016 |
3.5 stars. Typical Dickens which I normally love but this was not one of my favorites. It is the first one that I listened to and it took me quite awhile to get through so I think I just never got fully engaged with it. Despite that an average book by Dickens is still really enjoyable. Good characters with a strong narrator made for some entertaining scenes. ( )
  Lynsey2 | Jan 15, 2016 |
Nicolas Nickleby Charles Dickens
★★★★

I really enjoyed this story of good triumphing over evil and generosity and kindness being their own reward while greed and miserliness is punished.

We join the story just after Nicolas' father has died leaving him, his mother and his sister facing poverty, believing that their only relative Ralph Nickleby (a rich man) will help them, they appeal to him for support. Ralph however is a notorious money lender and will only offer help that benefits him.

Nicolas is sent of to be a tutor at a "Yorkshire school" where children are sent to be out of their parents way rather than for an education and where the headmaster and his family are cruel dictators.

Nicolas proves his worth by standing up for what he believes is right even though it makes him powerful enemies and from that point on the book is a straightforward battle between good and evil with each side well represented by solid characters.

This is a long book but well worth putting the time into reading, I loved the cast of characters and Nicolas himself is a delight to follow as he grows and matures into a man.
( )
  BookWormM | Jan 15, 2016 |
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» Add other authors (53 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Charles Dickensprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Browne, Hablot KnightIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Ford, MarkContributorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Jennings, AlexNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Parker, DavidEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Schlicke, PaulEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Thorndike, Dame SybilIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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There once lived, in a sequestered part of the county of Devonshire, one Mr Godfrey Nickleby: a worthy gentleman, who, taking it into his head rather late in life that he must get married, and not being young enough or rich enough to aspire to the hand of a lady of fortune, had wedded an old flame out of mere attachment, who in her turn had taken him for the same reason.
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Story of Nicholas Nickleby, a young man in nineteenth-century England.
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0140435123, Paperback)

When Nicholas Nickleby is left penniless after his father’s death, he appeals to his wealthy uncle to help him find work and to protect his mother and sister. But Ralph Nickleby proves both hard-hearted and unscrupulous, and Nicholas finds himself forced to make his own way in the world.

Nicholas’s adventures gave Dickens the opportunity to portray a extraordinary gallery of rogues and eccentrics: Wackford Squeers, tyrannical headmaster of Dotheboys Hall, a school for unwanted boys; the slow-witted orphan Smike, rescued by Nicholas; and the gloriously theatrical Mr and Mrs Crummle, and their daughter, the ‘infant phenomenon’. Like many of Dickens’s novels, Nicholas Nickleby is characterized by his outrage at cruelty and social injustice, but it is also a flamboyantly exuberant work, revealing Dickens’s comic genius at its most unerring.

Mark Ford’s introduction compares Nicholas Nickleby to eighteenth-century picaresque novels, and examines Dickens’s criticism of the ‘Yorkshire Schools’, his social satire and use of language. This edition also includes the original illustrations by ‘Phiz’, a chronology and a list for further reading.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:25:07 -0400)

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Audible.com

13 editions of this book were published by Audible.com.

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Penguin Australia

2 editions of this book were published by Penguin Australia.

Editions: 0140435123, 0141199814

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