HomeGroupsTalkZeitgeist
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Lizzie Bright and the Buckminster Boy by…
Loading...

Lizzie Bright and the Buckminster Boy (original 2004; edition 2006)

by Gary D. Schmidt

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
940519,268 (4.1)44
Member:queenteenlibrarian
Title:Lizzie Bright and the Buckminster Boy
Authors:Gary D. Schmidt
Info:Yearling (2006), Paperback, 224 pages
Collections:Your library
Rating:****
Tags:teen fiction, young adult fiction, juvenile fiction, historical fiction, racism, friendship, outcasts, death, religion

Work details

Lizzie Bright and the Buckminster Boy by Gary D. Schmidt (2004)

Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 44 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 50 (next | show all)
Good read for younger children. Gives a great account of a young boy learning how wrong and horrible people can be to others just because of the color of their skin or an differences really. ( )
  melissapetty10 | Mar 14, 2014 |
In my opinion, this is a great book. I liked this book for many reasons, but two main points alone would have me recommending this novel. First, I liked the character development throughout the story. The development and transformation of Turner's father was my favorite in the story. In the beginning, he was just a preacher who did not listen to what his son had to say, but listened to the ignorance of the new town. However, throughout the story he says or does something that shows that there is more to him. I did not like Reverend Buckminster in the beginning of the story, but I grew to care about him by the end.
I also liked the little plot details that the author wrote. The last words of Mrs. Cobb had a little message hidden inside. Mrs. Cobb thought hard about what her last words are going to be and said something very figurative and deep. However, she realized she wasn't quite dead yet and her last words turned out to be something the complete opposite of what she wanted. This scene represented who Mrs. Cobb was. She spent her whole life going to church and singing hymns and fitting in with society, but it was not who she really was.
The main idea of this novel is that, like Turner, his father, and Mrs. Cobb, you sometimes need to push the norm aside and do what you believe is right and just. ( )
  ocosta1 | Feb 27, 2014 |
I enjoyed reading Lizzie Bright and the Buckminster Boy for many reasons. First, I enjoyed the characters. I think the author did and excellent job describing all the characters from Turner, to Lizzie, to Mr. Stonecrop, etc. I also think the characters were very believable. I really enjoyed the interactions between Mr. Stonecrop and Reverend Buckminster towards the end of the book. I think the contrast in the two characters morals was portrayed flawlessly. Next, I enjoyed the authors writing. He used a lot of imagery and figurative language to describe many things. He did any great job of SHOWING not just telling readings how everything looked and felt. Finally, I loved the main message of the story. It is important for children to learn that standing up for what you believe in, even if it is going against the norm of society, is a very admirable trait. The fact that Turner never backed down and was persistent are all traits that students should learn about and understand. I especially enjoyed that even though Turner was the ministers son, he still stood up for what he believed was right. That shows that it's important to support what you think is right, and if you do your parents will likely be on your side. ( )
  stoppe3 | Feb 26, 2014 |
"Lizzie Bright and the Buckminster Boy" was a thrilling novel to read, filled with enough reality to reach out and touch a person's heart. It was a book that made me feel that I was living in the same time period as Turner Buckminster, that I felt all of the trials and tribulations he went through as he felt them himself in the novel. The language of the story was so descriptive and methodical, for example, the way everything from Malaga Island in its entirety to the short choppiness of a wave was described really allowed me as the reader to dive right in and fully envision the setting. By the end of the story, I had a vivid mental picture of what the inside of Mrs. Cobb's house, the cliffs at the New Meadows, Malaga Island, and the faces of Lizzie, Turner, Minister Buckminster, and Mrs. Cobb looked like - as long as a novel can accomplish this, it is great in my eyes. The characters were also believable, relatable, and well-developed. Turner and his various encounters with the society of Phippsburg was a relatable concept almost every child can relate to - doing something with good intentions, but not receiving praise because other people don't know your perspective. The plot was organized and purposeful, having a soft beginning and then building up in the last segment in the book to the expected deaths of Mrs. Cobb and Reverend Griffin, to the completely unexpected deaths of Reverend Buckminster and Lizzie ending the story. There were many big ideas of this novel, including the essence of needing to cherish the things in life that matter most, which Turner shows happen not to be what Phippsburg's idea of a minister's boy should be. Sometimes life is about touching a whale, or sneaking to a forbidden area of town to learn about clams or saving people that are being harshly and unnecessarily moved out of their homes. It also sends a message about what life was like for the average African-American in the segregation era. In conclusion, I would not only recommend this novel to young readers, (4th-5th grades) but I would require it as a teacher.
  dcully1 | Feb 26, 2014 |
I really enjoyed reading this book. One thing that made this book extremely interesting was the descriptive language. The author constantly uses descriptive language throughout the book, particularly when describing the scenery. For example, chapter nine starts with, “A round and golden moon rolled low along the horizon for the next few days, too huge and weighty to rise up any higher into the sky.” The author’s descriptive vocabulary made the story very engaging and I felt as though I could perfectly imagine every scene. I also think the characters in this story were very well-developed. I was particularly intrigued by Turner and his father, Reverend Buckminster. Their characters were extremely realistic and you are able to see the changes in their relationship and individual character overtime. For example, Reverend Buckminster’s actions and comments towards his son in the beginning of the book are very cold and it is almost as if he is ashamed to have him as a son. By the end of the story, Reverend Buckminster is standing up for his son against Mr. Stonecrop and others in the town, and he ends up losing his life defending him. Turner’s character also evolves throughout the book and the author wrote the story in a way that made it possible for the reader to go through Turner’s journey with him. He did a wonderful job explaining the different emotions Turner felt throughout the book. For example, it is clear that Turner felt a deeper meaning when describing that he saw something in the Whale’s eyes and in his father’s eyes. By the end of the story you are able to see that he was finally able to identify what that meaning was. I think that the explanations of Turner’s inner thoughts also helped the reader better understand his character by revealing how you interpreted and felt about all of the events that took place. Another thing that I really liked about this book was the plot. There were many situations in the story that were suspenseful and made me want to continue reading. Some suspenseful events include when we find out that Mrs. Cobb left her house to Turner, when Lizzie is hurt and the two of them are stuck at sea, and when Turner hears someone in Mrs. Cobb’s house towards the end of the story. The plot also has many broader conflicts that are dealt with over a longer period of time. For example, for the majority of the book I wondered what would happen to Lizzie Griffin and the other people living on Malaga Island. There were also times when the story moved at a slower pace, which I believe provided some relief from all of the other complicated situations taking place. For example, I thought that the times when Lizzie and Turner would go to Mrs. Cobb’s house portrayed this slower pace and lightened the mood. I believe that the overall message of this story is that it is important to be your own person and to stand up for what you believe in; even if the majority does not agree. ( )
  kbarge1 | Feb 26, 2014 |
Showing 1-5 of 50 (next | show all)
no reviews | add a review
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Series (with order)
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
For Virginia Buckley, who, like the sea breeze, urges us to our best shores.
First words
Turner Buckminster had lived in Phippsburg, Maine, for fifteen minutes shy of six hours.
Quotations
Last words
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Publisher series
Original language

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English

None

Book description
A minister's son moves with his family to a small Maine town in the early 1900s. He forms a friendship with a black girl from a nearby squatter community, and he and his family run afoul of the community when the town decides to evict the squatters and turn their land into a resort area.
Haiku summary

Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0553494953, Paperback)

Not only is Turner Buckminster the son of the new minister in a small Maine town, he is shunned for playing baseball differently than the local boys. Then he befriends smart and lively Lizzie Bright Griffin, a girl from Malaga Island, a poor community founded by former slaves. Lizzie shows Turner a new world along the Maine coast from digging clams to rowing a boat next to a whale. When the powerful town elders, including Turner’s father, decide to drive the people off the island to set up a tourist business, Turner stands alone against them. He and Lizzie try to save her community, but there’s a terrible price to pay for going against the tide.

(retrieved from Amazon Mon, 30 Sep 2013 13:50:47 -0400)

(see all 7 descriptions)

In 1911, Turner Buckminster hates his new home of Phippsburg, Maine, but things improve when he meets Lizzie Bright Griffin, a girl from a poor, nearby island community founded by former slaves that the town fathers--and Turner's--want to change into a tourist spot.… (more)

(summary from another edition)

» see all 2 descriptions

Quick Links

Swap Ebooks Audio
4 avail.
31 wanted
2 pay4 pay

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (4.1)
0.5
1
1.5 1
2 5
2.5 2
3 25
3.5 11
4 69
4.5 15
5 57

Audible.com

Two editions of this book were published by Audible.com.

See editions

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

Help/FAQs | About | Privacy/Terms | Blog | Contact | LibraryThing.com | APIs | WikiThing | Common Knowledge | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | 91,499,822 books! | Top bar: Always visible