HomeGroupsTalkZeitgeist
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

More Damned Lies and Statistics: How Numbers…
Loading...

More Damned Lies and Statistics: How Numbers Confuse Public Issues

by Joel Best

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
893135,585 (3.41)1

None.

None
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 1 mention

Showing 3 of 3
A worthy sequel to "Damned Lies and Statistics" in much the same vein.

The book has some significant flaws, however. The statement that there is no pro-bullying lobby is actually false; some of the more conservative politicians these days have stated pretty clearly that bullying is the kind of treatment queer kids deserve. There is a really awkward and unhelpful bit about percentages that should have been improved or omitted.

The book's strengths are the excellent writing and organization, particularly the way different kinds of statistics are broken down into missing numbers (relevant numbers that are simply overlooked in the discussion, sometimes because nobody likes them, sometimes because they are historical and forgotten), confusing numbers (more or less reliable numbers that are presented in misleading ways through arithmetical or graphical tricks or errors), scary numbers (numbers which are meant to alarm and motivate or intimidate), authoritative numbers (numbers from unusually reliable sources that may yet be misinterpreted), magical numbers (numbers on which important decisions rest that are amenable to manipulation) and contentious numbers (numbers that pop up in the course of a stats war, usually arising where there is little strong consensus on mechanisms, so that all arguments rest on statistical correlation or lack of it).

There is an afterword w/ more resources. The resources seem to be of variable quality; Numberwatch appears to be a mere hobby-horse for some pompous old professor, but StatLit looks kind of useful. ( )
  themulhern | Jan 11, 2015 |
A fine companion to innumeracy, this addresses statistical literacy; not the formulas, but the decisions underlying the collection and presentation of data
  Kaethe | May 27, 2008 |
Best continues the quality of Damned Lies and Statistics in this unplanned followup, which he created at the behest of his editor, drawing on numerous examples reported to him by fans of the original book. Best tackles numbers and how we think of them, and brings up the importance of statistical literacy for the electorate. ( )
  slothman | Mar 30, 2008 |
Showing 3 of 3
no reviews | add a review
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Series (with order)
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
Quotations
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Publisher series
Original language

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English (2)

Book description
Haiku summary

Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0520238303, Hardcover)

In this sequel to the acclaimed Damned Lies and Statistics, which the Boston Globe said "deserves a place next to the dictionary on every school, media, and home-office desk," Joel Best continues his straightforward, lively, and humorous account of how statistics are produced, used, and misused by everyone from researchers to journalists. Underlining the importance of critical thinking in all matters numerical, Best illustrates his points with examples of good and bad statistics about such contemporary concerns as school shootings, fatal hospital errors, bullying, teen suicides, deaths at the World Trade Center, college ratings, the risks of divorce, racial profiling, and fatalities caused by falling coconuts. More Damned Lies and Statistics encourages all of us to think in a more sophisticated and skeptical manner about how statistics are used to promote causes, create fear, and advance particular points of view.
Best identifies different sorts of numbers that shape how we think about public issues: missing numbers are relevant but overlooked; confusing numbers bewilder when they should inform; scary numbers play to our fears about the present and the future; authoritative numbers demand respect they don't deserve; magical numbers promise unrealistic, simple solutions to complex problems; and contentious numbers become the focus of data duels and stat wars. The author's use of pertinent, socially important examples documents the life-altering consequences of understanding or misunderstanding statistical information. He demystifies statistical measures by explaining in straightforward prose how decisions are made about what to count and what not to count, what assumptions get made, and which figures are brought to our attention.
Best identifies different sorts of numbers that shape how we think about public issues. Entertaining, enlightening, and very timely, this book offers a basis for critical thinking about the numbers we encounter and a reminder that when it comes to the news, people count--in more ways than one.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:20:23 -0400)

In this sequel to the acclaimed Damned Lies and Statistics, which the Boston Globe said "deserves a place next to the dictionary on every school, media, and home-office desk," Joel Best continues his straightforward, lively, and humorous account of how statistics are produced, used, and misused by everyone from researchers to journalists. Underlining the importance of critical thinking in all matters numerical, Best illustrates his points with examples of good and bad statistics about such contemporary concerns as school shootings, fatal hospital errors, bullying, teen suicides, deaths at the World Trade Center, college ratings, the risks of divorce, racial profiling, and fatalities caused by falling coconuts. More Damned Lies and Statistics encourages all of us to think in a more sophisticated and skeptical manner about how statistics are used to promote causes, create fear, and advance particular points of view.… (more)

» see all 2 descriptions

Quick Links

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (3.41)
0.5
1
1.5
2 2
2.5
3 2
3.5 3
4 3
4.5
5 1

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 125,351,756 books! | Top bar: Always visible