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Technically, You Started It by Lana Wood…
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Technically, You Started It (edition 2019)

by Lana Wood Johnson (Author)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
752273,144 (3.38)3
A hilarious, snarky, and utterly addicting #ownvoices debut that explores friendship, sexual orientation, mental health, and falling in love (even if things might be falling apart around you). When a guy named Martin Nathaniel Munroe II texts you, it should be obvious who you're talking to. Except there's two of them (it's a long story), and Haley thinks she's talking to the one she doesn't hate. A question about a class project rapidly evolves into an all-consuming conversation. Haley finds that Martin is actually willing to listen to her weird facts and unusual obsessions, and Martin feels like Haley is the first person to really see who he is. Haley and Martin might be too awkward to hang out in real life, but over text, they're becoming addicted to each other. There's just one problem: Haley doesn't know who Martin is. And Martin doesn't know that Haley doesn't know. But they better figure it out fast before their meet-cute becomes an epic meet-disaster...… (more)

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This YA novel is told entirely in text messages. When Martin sends Haley a message, Haley makes an assumption about which Martin from US History he is. After all, there are two of them in her class -- cousins with the exact same name.

I was hooked. I love epistolary novels -- I love stories driven by dialogue, and the way epistolary novels often require a reader to read between the lines and put the pieces together themselves. That involved working out why Haley doesn’t realise who Martin is and why, when Martin realises that she doesn’t, he doesn’t correct her. I thought their assumptions and choices were convincing and understandable (especially since they’re teenagers).

This book does a wonderful job of making their conversations both believable and possible for an outsider to follow. Haley and Martin just talk about the things that matter to them -- summer jobs, friends, family, their nerdy interests -- but they’re smart and funny and, certain assumptions aside, they’re good at listening to and understanding each other.

I don’t have anyone to talk about this kind of stuff with,
I mean, I guess I could talk to my mom, but that’d be so wrong.
Plus, she’d probably already know it.
And then she’d go into lecture mode.

And then your father would try to share the cool stuff he knows?
Yeah? How’d you know?
I listen to you, remember?
Oh, yeah.
Okay.

Did that freak you out?
A little.
???
I’m not used to people actually listening to me.
Or remembering all the stuff I say.
( )
  Herenya | Aug 2, 2020 |
Oh. This one was so awesome and sweet. The voices of both the artists who recorded this made it all the more great. Loved it. Must recommend to all ( )
  superphoenix | Jun 27, 2020 |
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For Michael,
whose Jetta is not crappy

&

for Monica,
whose Jetta kinda was
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Is this Haley Hancock from Mrs. James’s US History class?
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
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A hilarious, snarky, and utterly addicting #ownvoices debut that explores friendship, sexual orientation, mental health, and falling in love (even if things might be falling apart around you). When a guy named Martin Nathaniel Munroe II texts you, it should be obvious who you're talking to. Except there's two of them (it's a long story), and Haley thinks she's talking to the one she doesn't hate. A question about a class project rapidly evolves into an all-consuming conversation. Haley finds that Martin is actually willing to listen to her weird facts and unusual obsessions, and Martin feels like Haley is the first person to really see who he is. Haley and Martin might be too awkward to hang out in real life, but over text, they're becoming addicted to each other. There's just one problem: Haley doesn't know who Martin is. And Martin doesn't know that Haley doesn't know. But they better figure it out fast before their meet-cute becomes an epic meet-disaster...

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