HomeGroupsTalkZeitgeist
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Kabul Beauty School: An American Woman Goes…
Loading...

Kabul Beauty School: An American Woman Goes Behind the Veil (2007)

by Deborah Rodriguez

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
1,368725,605 (3.55)85
  1. 00
    I Have Iraq in My Shoe: Misadventures of a Soldier of Fashion by Gretchen Berg (CcanRead)
  2. 00
    The Bookseller of Kabul by Åsne Seierstad (citygirl)
    citygirl: A more erudite study of the lives of people in modern-day Kabul, by a Norweigan journalist who was allowed access to all parts of a large family.
  3. 00
    Honeymoon in Tehran by Azadeh Moaveni (elbakerone)
    elbakerone: Both these books explore the themes of Western women living in Middle Eastern countries and adjusting to a new culture.
  4. 00
    Outcasts United: A Refugee Team, an American Town by Warren St. John (elbakerone)
    elbakerone: Both these books tell powerful and inspirational stories about women making drastic differences in the lives of others.
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 85 mentions

English (71)  Catalan (1)  All languages (72)
Showing 1-5 of 71 (next | show all)
Though the author has a sincere wish to help women in Afghanistan, this account shows her to be otherwise self centered and foolish. ( )
  clue | Jul 25, 2014 |
bought in Shanghai, 24/06/08, for 170 RMB

( )
  Susanna.Dilliott | Apr 23, 2014 |
Found this in the laundry room tonight--it was an extremely fast (and not all that great) read.

Mostly I came away judging this woman's choices: she meets an Afghani man with a wife and seven daughters, with whom she doesn't speak a common language, and after three weeks she becomes his second wife? What? A google search indicates that they are no longer together (and she's no longer in Afghanistan) because he allegedly tried to extort money from her and kidnap her son.

Also, an NPR story mentions that there are exaggerations and inconsistencies in her story, and that the women she tried to help with this school have been endangered by the publication of a book. I had wondered about that last point myself.

So, not great all around. ( )
  thatotter | Feb 6, 2014 |
I feel like her experience could have been better had she come with some linguistic preparation. ( )
  briggs5 | Feb 5, 2014 |
A unique and readable glimpse of an infrequently seen angle of women's lives in Afghanistan. ( )
  KayMackey | Jan 7, 2014 |
Showing 1-5 of 71 (next | show all)
no reviews | add a review
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Series (with order)
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Luckily, I am a lady / Mariam of my own epoch / I have conscience, / Intelligence and talent / But am fated to continue / Existence / In captivity behind the / Bars of prison of life / As if I am a jail-bird / I want to declare my feelings / But nobody seems to realize me / I am being asked to stay thoroughly our of sight, / In the darkness / Why? / Because it is easy for them to disgrace me and discard me / They have covered me from head to toe / Amputated my legs / Shut my mouth / Oh! / I want to be known / If not as I am a female / But through my knowledge / Let the years go / Let them have my written words / One day they will ask whose / unique words are these / Maybe at that time they will / Know me as / a female who can do something / I am hopefull... -Farida Alimi
Dedication
This book is dedicated to my father, Junior Turner, who passed away June 5, 2002, while I was on my first trip to Afghanistan. Dad, I never got a chance to tell you about Afghanistan and the school. You left me too soon. I know you would love Sam, my husband--he is just like you, but Afghan style. I know you would be worried, but also very happy that I am following my dream. I miss you.
First words
The women arrive at the salon just before eight in the morning.
Quotations
Last words
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Publisher series
Original language

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English (2)

Book description
Haiku summary

Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0812976738, Paperback)

Soon after the fall of the Taliban, in 2001, Deborah Rodriguez went to Afghanistan as part of a group offering humanitarian aid to this war-torn nation. Surrounded by men and women whose skills–as doctors, nurses, and therapists–seemed eminently more practical than her own, Rodriguez, a hairdresser and mother of two from Michigan, despaired of being of any real use. Yet she soon found she had a gift for befriending Afghans, and once her profession became known she was eagerly sought out by Westerners desperate for a good haircut and by Afghan women, who have a long and proud tradition of running their own beauty salons. Thus an idea was born.

With the help of corporate and international sponsors, the Kabul Beauty School welcomed its first class in 2003. Well meaning but sometimes brazen, Rodriguez stumbled through language barriers, overstepped cultural customs, and constantly juggled the challenges of a postwar nation even as she learned how to empower her students to become their families’ breadwinners by learning the fundamentals of coloring techniques, haircutting, and makeup.

Yet within the small haven of the beauty school, the line between teacher and student quickly blurred as these vibrant women shared with Rodriguez their stories and their hearts: the newlywed who faked her virginity on her wedding night, the twelve-year-old bride sold into marriage to pay her family’s debts, the Taliban member’s wife who pursued her training despite her husband’s constant beatings. Through these and other stories, Rodriguez found the strength to leave her own unhealthy marriage and allow herself to love again, Afghan style.

With warmth and humor, Rodriguez details the lushness of a seemingly desolate region and reveals the magnificence behind the burqa. Kabul Beauty School is a remarkable tale of an extraordinary community of women who come together and learn the arts of perms, friendship, and freedom.


From the Hardcover edition.

(retrieved from Amazon Mon, 30 Sep 2013 13:26:19 -0400)

(see all 2 descriptions)

"Soon after the fall of the Taliban, in 2001, Deborah Rodriguez went to Afghanistan as part of a humanitarian aid group. Surrounded by people whose skills--as doctors, nurses, and therapists--seemed eminently more practical than her own, Rodriguez, a hairdresser and mother from Michigan, despaired of being of any real use. Yet she found she had a gift for befriending Afghans, and once her profession became known she was eagerly sought out by Westerners desperate for a good haircut and by Afghan women, who have a long and proud tradition of running their own beauty salons. Thus the idea for the Kabul Beauty School was born. Within that small haven, the line between teacher and student quickly blurred as these vibrant women shared with Rodriguez their stories and their hearts, ultimately giving her the strength to leave her own unhealthy marriage and allow herself to love again, Afghan style."--From publisher description.… (more)

» see all 6 descriptions

Quick Links

Swap Ebooks Audio
59 avail.
155 wanted
4 pay3 pay

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (3.55)
0.5 3
1 10
1.5 7
2 33
2.5 13
3 121
3.5 40
4 166
4.5 14
5 65

Audible.com

An edition of this book was published by Audible.com.

See editions

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

Help/FAQs | About | Privacy/Terms | Blog | Contact | LibraryThing.com | APIs | WikiThing | Common Knowledge | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | 92,311,465 books! | Top bar: Always visible