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The Sun Also Rises (Fiesta) by Ernest…

The Sun Also Rises (Fiesta) (original 1926; edition 1957)

by Ernest Hemingway

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15,646211113 (3.82)1 / 450
Title:The Sun Also Rises (Fiesta)
Authors:Ernest Hemingway
Info:Pan Books (1957), Paperback
Collections:Your library

Work details

The Sun Also Rises by Ernest Hemingway (1926)

  1. 31
    The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald (sturlington)
    sturlington: Great novels of the Jazz Age.
  2. 21
    The Professor's House by Willa Cather (2below)
    2below: These are both poignant stories about the disruption and disorder that results from not being where we want to be in life and living in denial of that sad truth.
  3. 00
    The Dangerous Summer by Ernest Hemingway (GYKM)
  4. 00
    The Garden of Eden by Ernest Hemingway (John_Vaughan)
  5. 22
    As I Lay Dying by William Faulkner (2below)
    2below: Both involve complicated characters (some might say messed up), crazy mishaps, and fascinating unstable and unreliable narratives. Also excellent examples of Modernist fiction.
  6. 01
    A Moveable Feast by Ernest Hemingway (John_Vaughan)
  7. 01
    The Listless by Steven Mohr (jessie-A)
  8. 01
    Death in the Afternoon by Ernest Hemingway (GYKM)

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The reader is plunged vividly into the worlds of both the post-war lost generation of Paris in the 1920's and the blood-soaked and alcohol-fuelled fiesta de San Firmino of Pamplona. As always, Hemingway is sparse, brutal, and masculine. ( )
  deckehoe | Nov 27, 2015 |
In my younger and more parochial years, I loved the Paris chapters, which made me feel worldly and knowing and vicariously well-traveled. Once the setting shifts to Spain. . .well, I guess you have to really be into matadors and fishing and romanticized peasants. When I read this a few years back the whole thing fell flat. But four stars because of how the Paris chapters once made me feel. ( )
  middlemarchhare | Nov 25, 2015 |
I was extremely underwhelmed by this book, especially considering how often it shows up on the "greatest novels of all time" lists. Quite honestly, I'm not sure what anyone really enjoyed:

* It's hard to sympathize with or like any of the characters. They are all repulsive or unattractive in one way or another which makes it hard to care about what happens to them.

* I also found most of the characters to be pretty one dimensional. From the first introduction of each one, it usually becomes clear what they represent and they don't really develop or change in any way. You've got the Jewish guy who just wants everyone to like him but instead is surrounded by antisemitism (not necessarily the author's, just the times), you've got the drunk Scottish war veteran, a cocky Spanish bull fighter, an impotent narrator and a slutty and manly spoiled brat of a woman. They all start the novel that way and they all end the novel that way and the lack of any development makes the story very dull.

* Moreover, there is no real plot to speak of. Quite frankly, nothing really happens in the novel. The vast majority of it is spent describing the obscene amount of time and money the characters spend drinking and partying. Although I understand that this is one of the themes of the novel - how meaningful life is for its characters - it makes for a very uncompelling story.

There were two positive points:

(1) I listened to the audiobook version which was extremely well read.

(2) The last few sentences of the novel are somewhat moving and do a good job of tying some themes back together. However, it was just not enough to save this book.

( )
  brikis98 | Nov 11, 2015 |
Such a sad and moving tale. Ernest Hemingway's style of writing is so simple and leaves its mark. ( )
  trile1000 | Oct 23, 2015 |
How do we evaluate novels written in a different historical millieu? Do we only regard them as we would have back then, judged by what audiences then would say about their content? Or do we instead evaluate them from the perspective of today?

More confusingly, what do we say about characters who are intended to be kind of unlikable, and incidentally racist? In some cases, as The Great Gatsby, the two are undeniably linked. But in others, like this book, they seem separate: everyone's kinda racist! Can we not hold that against the novel's quality, while simultaneously celebrating the zeitgeist revealed by time's distance?

Mixed up in all this is the old question of authorial intent. How much of these distasteful, annoying elements did Hemingway mean to put into the novel? Does that matter for how good the novel is? To put it another way, is this (somewhat unintended) mimesis make the novel all the more true to life, or just an asshole?

Sadly, these worries—far more than the plot or characters—are what animated my relationship with the book. Hemingway, being one of the most lauded American writers of the 20th century, certainly deserves the benefit of my doubt. And yet.

This might be due to me reading them nearby, but I can't help but compare The Sun Also Rises to The Great Gatsby, as I alluded to earlier. In that case, Fitzgerald seems to recognize the hubris brought about by material wealth, satirizing and excoriating it in turn. Yet for Hemingway, those are just the background noise; the lower-class here are native scenery, mentioned as chauffeurs and concierges and Spanish locals. While there are a few characters who play larger roles, for most of the book it feels like an exotic adventure where the characters find themselves, like a depressing version of Eat, Pray, Love.

Ours heroes are largely American expatriates, enjoying the newfound affluence of US influence abroad, and most of all the benefits of their class. While Gatsby was undone by daring to prize wealth, Hemingway's protagonists take financial security for granted, instead suffering from generalized anomie after The War. To put it another way, FItzgerald's sympathies are with Nick Carraway and Jay Gatsby—Hemingway's are with the partygoers.

I'm one of the last people to demand likable protagonists in a novel, but all I ask for is some self-awareness of what's going on from the writer. And here's where the problem of intent and history comes into play: if the book seems to not fully apprehend its own characters, does that make it a bad one? I'd say yes, and that problem was largely why I didn't like the book.

That said, by the end I did come around some on my assessment. At first, Hemingway's prose largely fell flat for me. The novel almost felt like a summary of itself, an abridgment stripped of scene details and all the stuff that makes me love literature. Instead, we get a parade of insufferable bon mots, driving in the point again and again that these people are deeply bored and deeply unhappy. It took a few chapters to actually get a good description of where the characters even were, and up to that point I was almost ready to chuck the book against the wall. The writing feels punchy, but I felt exactly zero kinship with (and zero understanding of) how it understands the experience of reality.

But once the book reaches Spain, the world becomes more fleshed out. Paris wasn't just boring to us, but also boring to the main characters. While the bullfights are famously detailed, even the lesser aspects of the town receive far more attention than Paris. The feeling is of a finer perception of the world, even called out specifically when Jake newly notices his surroundings after a fight. This kind of subjectivity was a pleasant discovery, and one that raised my opinion of Hemingway, even if not of the book as a whole. I can understand the choice he made, but I think the drawbacks far outweigh the benefits.

I know for sure that someone's going to sucker me into reading other Hemingway in the future, but this outing has left me with near-zero appetite for such an undertaking. My reactions moderated some by the end, but I can't get over my disgust for the first hundred pages. Ugh. ( )
1 vote lt_ammar_test_02 | Oct 19, 2015 |
Showing 1-5 of 200 (next | show all)
No amount of analysis can convey the quality of "The Sun Also Rises." It is a truly gripping story, told in a lean, hard, athletic narrative prose that puts more literary English to shame. Mr. Hemingway knows how not only to make words be specific but how to arrange a collection of words which shall betray a great deal more than is to be found in the individual parts. It is magnificent writing, filled with that organic action which gives a compelling picture of character. This novel is unquestionably one of the events of an unusually rich year in literature.

» Add other authors (30 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Hemingway, Ernestprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Bruccoli, Matthew J.Introductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Cannon, PamelaCover designersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Hurt, WilliamNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Scholz, WilhemCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed

Is contained in

Four Novels: A Farewell to Arms / For Whom The Bell Tolls / The Old Man and the Sea / The Sun Also Rises by Ernest Hemingway

Romanzi volume I by Ernest Hemingway

The Novels Of Ernest Hemingway . by Ernest Hemingway

The Essential Hemingway by Ernest Hemingway

Five Novels: The Sun Also Rises / A Farewell to Arms / To Have and Have Not / The Old Man and the Sea / For Whom the Bell Tolls (FOLIO SOCIETY) by Ernest Hemingway

The Sun Also Rises / A Farewell to Arms / The Old Man and the Sea by Ernest Hemingway

For Whom the Bell Tolls / The Snows of Kilimanjaro / Fiesta / The Short Happy Life of Francis Macomber / Across the River and into the Trees / The Old Man and the Sea by Ernest Hemingway

The Sun Also Rises / A Farewell to Arms / For Whom The Bell Tolls by Ernest Hemingway

Four Book Set (QP) {Complete Short Stories; Farewell to Arms, For Whom the Bell Tolls, Sun Also Rises} by Ernest Hemingway

Book-of-the-Month-Club Set of 5: A Farewell to Arms, A Moveable Feast, For Whom the Bell Tolls, The Sun Also Rises, & The Complete Short Stories of Ernest Hemingway (The Finca Vigia Edition) (Book-of-the-Month Club) by Ernest Hemingway

A Moveable Feast / For Whom the Bell Tolls / A Farewell to Arms / The Sun Also Rises by Ernest Hemingway

Ernest Hemingway Boxed Set: Comprising Farewell to Arms; for Whom the Bell Tolls; Sun Also Rises; Death in the Afternoon by Ernest Hemingway

In Our Time, The Sun Also Rises, A Farewell to Arms - Boxed set by Ernest Hemingway

Ernest Hemingway 6 Vols: A Moveable Feast / The Old Man and the Sea / A Farewell to Arms / For Whom the Bell Tolls / The Complete Short Stories / The Sun Also Rises by Ernest Hemingway

Ernest Hemingway - Four Novels - Complete and Unabridged: The Sun Also Rises, A Farewell to Arms, For Whom the Bell Tolls, The Old Man and the Sea by Ernest Hemingway

Hemmingway - The Sun Also Rises, a Farewell to Arms, to Have and Have Not, for Whom the Bell Tolls by Ernest Hemingway

Aguas primaverale / Fiesta / Adiós a las armas / Tener y no tener by Ernest Hemingway

Og solen går sin gang; At have og ikke have; Den gamle mand og havet by Ernest Hemingway



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"You are all a lost generation." -- Gertrude Stein in conversation
"One generation passeth away, and another generation cometh; but the earth abideth forever... The sun also ariseth, and the sun goeth down, and hasteth to the place where he arose...The wind goeth toward the south, and turneth about unto the north; it whirleth about continually, and the wind returneth again according to his circuits...All the rivers run into the sea; yet the sea is not full; unto the place from whence the rivers come, thither they return again." -- Ecclesiastes
This book is for Hadley and for John Hadley Nicanor
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Robert Cohn was once middleweight boxing champion of Princeton.
They only want to kill when they're alone.
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Published under two titles:
The Sun Also Rises
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Wikipedia in English (3)

Book description
At the beginning of The Sun Also Rises, Hemingway's first novel, he quotes Gertrude Stein as saying “You are all a lost generation.” He and his peers were soon known as “The Lost Generation,” a nickname still used for these post World War I artists and writers and their modern style.

With the book's publication in 1926, the American expatriate community in Paris tried to identify the originals of the characters. Jake Barnes seemed to bear a close resemblance in some ways to Robert McAlmon and in others to William Bird; Lady Brett Ashley was considered a portrait of Lady Duff Twysden; Robert Cohn a version of Harold Loeb; Mike Campbell a version of Patrick Guthrie; and Bill Gorton patterned after Hemingway's pal Donald Ogden Stewart.

Lady Duff Twysden, an Englishwoman born Mary Smurthwaite, was an aristocrat by marriage to her second husband. Known as a hard drinker, Twysden was popular with the mainly male ex-pat crowd. She embodied the new liberated woman of the 1920s and photos of her at the time show a tall, thin boyish-looking woman with short hair. She was also fond of referring to herself as a “chap."

Lady Brett dominates the novel, even when she's not present.  Jake drinks a lot but Brett drinks more. Brett goes from relationship to relationship. And Brett makes a connection between the major male characters in the novel — Barnes, Cohn, and Romero.

Many people were angered by some of the portrayals. However, the novel won rave reviews. The New York Times said its “hard athletic narrative prose puts more literary English to shame."
Haiku summary

Amazon.com Amazon.com Review (ISBN 0743297334, Paperback)

The Sun Also Rises first appeared in 1926, and yet it's as fresh and clean and fine as it ever was, maybe finer. Hemingway's famously plain declarative sentences linger in the mind like poetry: "Brett was damned good-looking. She wore a slipover jersey sweater and a tweed skirt, and her hair was brushed back like a boy's. She started all that." His cast of thirtysomething dissolute expatriates--Brett and her drunken fiancé, Mike Campbell, the unhappy Princeton Jewish boxer Robert Cohn, the sardonic novelist Bill Gorton--are as familiar as the "cool crowd" we all once knew. No wonder this quintessential lost-generation novel has inspired several generations of imitators, in style as well as lifestyle.

Jake Barnes, Hemingway's narrator with a mysterious war wound that has left him sexually incapable, is the heart and soul of the book. Brett, the beautiful, doomed English woman he adores, provides the glamour of natural chic and sexual unattainability. Alcohol and post-World War I anomie fuel the plot: weary of drinking and dancing in Paris cafés, the expatriate gang decamps for the Spanish town of Pamplona for the "wonderful nightmare" of a week-long fiesta. Brett, with fiancé and ex-lover Cohn in tow, breaks hearts all around until she falls, briefly, for the handsome teenage bullfighter Pedro Romero. "My God! he's a lovely boy," she tells Jake. "And how I would love to see him get into those clothes. He must use a shoe-horn." Whereupon the party disbands.

But what's most shocking about the book is its lean, adjective-free style. The Sun Also Rises is Hemingway's masterpiece--one of them, anyway--and no matter how many times you've read it or how you feel about the manners and morals of the characters, you won't be able to resist its spell. This is a classic that really does live up to its reputation. --David Laskin

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:07:51 -0400)

(see all 6 descriptions)

"The quintessential novel of the Lost Generation, The Sun Also Rises is one of Ernest Hemingway's masterpieces and a classic example of his spare but powerful writing style. A poignant look at the disillusionment and angst of the post-World War I generation, the novel introduces two of Hemingway's most unforgettable characters : Jake Barnes and Lady Brett Ashley. The story follows the flamboyant Brett and the hapless Jake as they journey from the wild nightlife of 1920s Paris to the brutal bull-fighting rings of Spain with a motley group of expatriates. It is an age of moral bankruptcy, spiritual dissolution, unrealized love, and vanishing illusions. First published in 1926, The Sun Also Rises helped to establish Hemingway as one of the greatest writers of the twentieth century."--P. [4] of cover.… (more)

(summary from another edition)

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Legacy Library: Ernest Hemingway

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