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Fiesta by Ernest Hemingway
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Fiesta (original 1926; edition 2003)

by Ernest Hemingway

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingConversations / Mentions
15,466204118 (3.82)1 / 446
Un grupo de americanos e ingleses afincados en París. Personajes desgarrados, errráticos y descritos con tal veracidad que acabarán dando nombre a esa Generación Perdida, terminada la Primera Guerra Mundial. Sus andanzas desde la Rive Gauche a los Sanfermines, narradas con pulso tenso, en una atmósfera desesperadamente vital, y amenazante. ( )
  biblisad | May 28, 2012 |
English (195)  Dutch (2)  Norwegian (1)  Italian (1)  Hebrew (1)  German (1)  Spanish (1)  Swedish (1)  All languages (203)
Showing 1-25 of 195 (next | show all)
"The things that happened could only have happened during a fiesta", 15 June 2015

This review is from: Fiesta: The Sun Also Rises (Paperback)
I read this after a visit to Pamplona, where Hemingway is a Big Name. I hadn't been too struck on previous works of his, so began dubiously.
This novel is narrated by one Jake Barnes, a young American, and his 'gang' of friends, notably Lady Brett Ashley and her hard-drinking fiance. These 'bright young things' have been damaged by WW1 - Jake (like just about all the men) is in love with Brett, but has been rendered impotent. She, meanwhile, seems emotionally scarred: we learn in a conversation that her true love died during the War, while she served as a V.A.D. in a hospital.
Opening in Paris, where life is one round of alcoholic nights out and - for Brett - a succession of meaningless assignations with men - the group move off to take in Pamplona for some fishing and the annual fiesta and bullfights. I got quite caught up in the book at this point, thinking I knew what was going to happen to this little group of people among whom passions were aroused, echoing the descriptions of the bullfights (I was totally wrong!)
A book that grew on me, despite having a largely unlikeable cast of characters. Hemingway brings the atmosphere of Spain to life. ( )
  starbox | Jun 14, 2015 |
Kindred's Reading Challenge: #17 A novel by Steinbeck, Hemingway or F. Scott Fitzgerald
  LaMala | Jun 7, 2015 |
I'm pretty sure that I read some Hemingway in high school and didn't like his writing. While waiting for a book for which I got on a waiting list at our library system here in San Diego, I decided to read this one in the meantime. This one really doesn't hold up very well, especially if you put alongside The Great Gatsby.

Lean, strong prose? I beg to differ. It's spare, but it ain't pretty. Gets a mention for a record number of sentences with multiple "ands" in them. Otherwise told mostly via conversations, which seem banal and repetitive. No real character development occurs. Decades of adulation seem to have made this book immune to criticism, but I still think it's just not very good.

File under: Alcoholism; Fatalism; Animal Cruelty (Bovine). ( )
  nog | Apr 28, 2015 |
O uso de simbolismo é notável neste instigante romance, cuja primeira terça parte é um pouco lenta demais. Jake e seus amigos levam uma vida sem rumo - e a primeira parte do texto é muito... Sem rumo. Os amigos expatriados passar o tempo inteiro embebedando-se, permanecendo bêbados ou curando ressacas. Passam o tempo comendo, bebendo e sendo o mais insensível quanto possível um ao outro. Eis o que foi batizado de "geração perdida". Seria fácil descartar tais personagens como desfrutáveis e, por isso, desinteressantes. Nada disso. Em uma frase, eles são "bens danificados" - corroídos. Não há felicidade para a "lost generation". Há, sim, uma ironia considerável, - corrosiva - ao longo de todo o texto. ( )
  jgcorrea | Apr 24, 2015 |
Loved the critique of ex-pat society in the 1920's. Loved the slight on the French. Loved that this American man experienced and described the corridas in a decade where few would have known what the hell he was talking about. Loved that he uses French and Spanish words and doesn't define them. In general, I very much enjoyed this book and look forward to the rest of Hemingway. Say what you will of his character, but writing by your own rules certainly has an impact. ( )
  JenBurge | Mar 20, 2015 |
The Sun Also Rises was Ernest Hemingway’s first novel, written in 1926. It is a roman a clef, describing in thinly disguised fiction a series of events he experienced in the early 1920s. As such, nothing really important happens. The main characters are a group of American expatriates living in Paris shortly after the end of World War I. On a whim, they decide to take a trip to Spain to engage in two of the real Hemingway’s favorite activities: they go fishing and watch the running of the bulls and the bull fights at the fiesta of San Fermin in Pamplona.

Most of the book consists of the conversations that Jake Barnes has with the other characters. The writing is terse and was probably witty in the early 1920s, but much of Hemingway’s diction has become a bit dated. It is still an enjoyable if easy read, but were it not for its historical significance, I would not rate it very highly.

Ethnic stereotypes of the period come through the narrative. One of the more noble characters is a very competent prize fighter who happens to be “a good nigger.” One of the principal characters is reviled by the others because of his “superior Jewish” manners. Most of the other characters consume alcohol in unrealistically prodigious quantities, and are not particularly lovable. They are, however, well wrought in that they are multidimensional, and the reader gets a sense of knowing and understanding them by the end of the book.

Hemingway is revered as a writer because he wrote in a way that appeared conversational, but was actually quite artful. This book was one of the first examples of that style. His description of the bull fights is quite vivid, but his account of the fishing is pretty prosaic compared to his later efforts in The Old Man and the Sea or even Islands in the Stream. I recommend this book as good airplane reading, but I would not rank it with the works of Faulkner or Updike.

(JAB) ( )
1 vote nbmars | Feb 17, 2015 |
I read this book in college. It cemented my dislike of Hemingway as an author who could not write about women or for women. Even though I have read a couple more books by him since, I have given up on him and will likely not read any more. ( )
  sturlington | Feb 16, 2015 |
Lovely edition of my favorite of his books, with a hand-tipped cover illustration, Woman With a Mandolin by Georges Braque (1937.) Beautiful writing, timeless story, very handsome book. Best last line in the history of novels. ( )
  unclebob53703 | Jan 24, 2015 |
Far be it from me to critique actual literature! I really am quite fond of Hemingway, especially his short stories. I was interested in (re-?) reading this because of the recent publications about the time in his life when this book was being written, given that the characters and travels were loosely based on actual persons and occurences. I guess the book strikes me as ultimately being about nothing, kind of in the way that Seinfeld was a show about nothing. But then again, wasn't that the point? ( )
  MaureenCean | Jan 19, 2015 |
The Sun Also Rises is about how a protracted and tragically untreated case of sexual impotence ruined an otherwise rock solid relationship for a young U.S. expatriate named Jake Barnes. Sometime during those no doubt rollicking but overrated roaring twenties, Jake had himself the hots (he had it bad, man!) for a sweet society lass -- a Lady -- named Brett Ashley. Unfortunately, for both Lady Ashley and Mr. Barnes, the sun was about the only thing that rose during their doomed romance ... excluding the Eiffel Tower, of course. And run on sentences galore like the running of the bullshits.

Yada yada yada, Papa! ( )
8 vote EnriqueFreeque | Dec 7, 2014 |
So, there is so much written about this book, I think I'll restrain my comments to it's interaction with me rather than trying to add to the pile of comments, essays, and dissertations on the author's writing style, lifestyle, roman a clef, lost generation, anti-Semitic or homophobic, blah blah blah...

I think that with anything that receives that much attention, people largely see what they want to see, find the hidden truths they themselves buried beneath the sands of time.

It's not the greatest book, not the greatest I've read, nor even the greatest I've read in the last month ([b:Swann's Way|12749|Swann's Way (In Search of Lost Time, #1)|Marcel Proust|http://d.gr-assets.com/books/1269255643s/12749.jpg|4830806]) I didn't love it, I liked it a lot. It's short, so go read it. And it should be read.

Brass Tacks, Hemingway Style: It's a good book. A damn good book. The kind of book it's writer can hang a hat on. It wasn't the best, but it was true. ( )
1 vote wjmcomposer | Nov 5, 2014 |
So, there is so much written about this book, I think I'll restrain my comments to it's interaction with me rather than trying to add to the pile of comments, essays, and dissertations on the author's writing style, lifestyle, roman a clef, lost generation, anti-Semitic or homophobic, blah blah blah...

I think that with anything that receives that much attention, people largely see what they want to see, find the hidden truths they themselves buried beneath the sands of time.

It's not the greatest book, not the greatest I've read, nor even the greatest I've read in the last month ([b:Swann's Way|12749|Swann's Way (In Search of Lost Time, #1)|Marcel Proust|http://d.gr-assets.com/books/1269255643s/12749.jpg|4830806]) I didn't love it, I liked it a lot. It's short, so go read it. And it should be read.

Brass Tacks, Hemingway Style: It's a good book. A damn good book. The kind of book it's writer can hang a hat on. It wasn't the best, but it was true. ( )
1 vote wjmcomposer | Nov 5, 2014 |
Very good clear prose, technically seen. And Hemingway is very visual in the description of Paris,Spain, bullfighting, fishing and boxing and cycling sports. You have to place the novel, in the historical time (nineteen twenties). Nowadays, you can see the description of the Jewish character Robert Cohn as political incorrect, as also the bullfighting can be seen nowadays. ( )
  timswings | Sep 21, 2014 |
Such a sad and moving tale. Ernest Hemingway's style of writing is so simple and leaves its mark. ( )
  trile1000 | Jul 7, 2014 |
First, before people get their panties in a twist, Hemmingway is one of the most technically perfect writers I have ever read. Each sentence is like a jewel, perfectly clear, perfectly cut. His descriptions of scene are brilliant, perfect, rich and evocative. But that is just the trees, eventually one needs to look at the forest, and the forest is not so good.

I will start with the endless casual anti-Semitism and misogyny. I expect and accept some of both in books of this era. That said, the anti-Semitism is a large part of the central narrative here and so cannot be ignored. Jews are greedy money-grubbing angry WASP wannabes. For the WASPs they are like barnacles, clinging with all their might hoping that by the reflected glory of the association they will achieve WASPness. If only it were not for those damn kikes (that word is used in the book) everything would be glorious for the gentiles.

Now is a good time to mention that said gentiles are awful people, though their awfulness is never acknowledged or in any way linked in the book to sanguinity. (I will note that I got that Jake was Catholic, but he was "forgiven" by the others and clearly considered an honorary Anglican.) The only female character is a psychopath (I use that term in the clinical sense, not as an epithet) who is the very definition of all women, of feminine perfection, in the eyes of these bozos. If all women were like Bret I too would be a misogynist. The men are vacuous drunks, led only by their dicks, hungry for the metallic tang of the blood of the bullring and the burn of the Pernod downed to dampen the sting of rejection from the psychopath. Worst of all, despite all the strum und drang these people are freaking boring. Being a brokedown drunk or a manipulative bitch living perilously off an allowance which disappears too rapidly is just fine if you can provide a little excitement. If any of these characters were real people living now they would be the cast of Big Brother Ibiza. ( )
1 vote Narshkite | Jun 23, 2014 |
A tale of rich people (men and their one female companion - who they all seemed to want, although I can't work out why as she was extremely whiney) who drink and squander money they got from God knows where through France and Spain. While amusing in some places, I'm not sure I get all the fuss. Maybe I didn't understand it... ( )
  crashmyparty | May 14, 2014 |
When I finished this book on March 12, 1955, I said: "I so envied the characters, getting to spend such delightful days and nights in Paris and Spain. I felt so refreshed by Hemingway's clear, clean prose, better, I think, than his later stuff. I was quite caught up in the style, and of course vicariously enjoyed the drinking that so reminded me of my brief times in Europe. Golly, how I wish I could go to Europe." ( )
1 vote Schmerguls | Apr 30, 2014 |
I'm kind of waffling between 3 and 4 stars. When I first started reading - after not reading any Hemingway for years - I was put off by the bareness of it - a sketch of a story, not fleshed out with the type of description I'm used to, and with bits of dialogue so foreign to what I'm used to. I found myself wondering what would happen to Hemingway's manuscript if it landed in the slush pile at a literary agency or publishing house in 2012. My thought was that a young reader would toss it aside after a few short pages.

But the more I read, the more I began to enjoy the characters and story, and the writing itself. The characters and dialogue and the very plot began to intrigue me. I will probably read it again, because I'm sure there are subtleties that I missed the first time through. It's got me wanting to reread more of Papa's work.

( )
  REDonald | Apr 26, 2014 |
I didn't actually "read" this. I listened to it on tape in the car during a long trip. I'm in awe of the power of Hemingway's writing. Not very politically correct by today's standards, but given the context of the time in which it was written, it still holds up. ( )
  gkyoungen | Mar 24, 2014 |
My favorite Hemingway. Explores the expatriates of the list generation. ( )
  jamesfallen | Feb 7, 2014 |
My favorite Hemingway. Explores the expatriates of the list generation. ( )
  jamesfallen | Feb 7, 2014 |
I'll be honest, I was bored during the majority of the book. The characters were, for the most part, unsympathetic. The premise was dull, and, though it is, in theory, Jake talking about Cohn, I didn't feel like it was Cohn's story...and he was the only one with much of a background at all. I am not a fan of the style, the simplistic adjectives and the high amounts of repetition (possibly a carry over from Hemingway's own association with Stein),and I probably wouldn't read it again, but I am content that I read it at least once. ( )
  CSTaylor24 | Jan 23, 2014 |
To be completely honest, I read this novel just to read it. Taking this into consideration, I understand (and I'm sure most of you reading will, as well) that having read this fiction I only got out of it what I wanted, or what I searched for. The first section of the novel caught me by surprise by how drawn-out it seemed; sure, this was the base of the novel, but I did not appreciate the fact that it set the tone for the rest of what was to come. What came was a story of some chaps going to a fiesta, and all of them, horribly in love with the one chick, getting beat out by a young matador. One chap, the main chap, didn't have a wee, but he seemed to be doing perfectly fine without it seeing how he has a respectable job, a shit-load of money, and can enjoy the finer things in life. The other guys... Bill seemed normal. Mike might be a bit of a drunk and have some problems with repetition (for Christ's sake), but I'd say he's alright. Cohn, on the other hand, has, I'd say, the most development in the story because of his background and what he gets himself into. Overall, I didn't keep reading this novel for the characters. The story wasn't something to coo for, either. I mean, at certain points, I'm glad that Hemingway wrote this because he did the matador rather well; however, when he got to describing the scenery, I got quite tired; and the name-drops of all these places in France--mostly bars... I felt like it was a prerequisite to have gone to France!

I would have much rather read a Henry James piece about Americans in Europe than this novel. To me, this whole story could have and probably should have been way shorter for the amount of positives it shares with anyone who read it. I give it two stars because it is Hemingway. And Hemingway does know how to write. ( )
  Max-Tyrone | Jan 10, 2014 |
Short sentences, lots of drinking, dissolute characters and bulls. ( )
  Doondeck | Nov 20, 2013 |
I am being generous by giving this three stars, but what can I say, it is Ernest Hemingway. I can't really say I liked it, because it is so depressing. Lives going no where... endless drinking... but I guess that was the point. Not my favorite! ( )
  KristinaMiranda | Oct 26, 2013 |
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