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Woken Furies (2005)

by Richard K. Morgan

Other authors: See the other authors section.

Series: Takeshi Kovacs (3)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
2,168435,106 (3.92)37
This is high action, ideas driven noir SF of the highest order. Morgan has already established himself as an SF author of global significance. Takeshi Kovacs has come home. Home to Harlan's World. An ocean planet with only 5% of its landmass poking above the dangerous and unpredictable seas. Try and get above the weather in anything more sophisticated than a helicopter and the Martian orbital platforms will burn you out of the sky. And death doesn't just wait for you in the seas and the skies. On land, from the tropical beaches and swamps of Kossuth to the icy, machine-infested wastes of New Hokkaido the hard won gains of the Quellist revolution have been lost. The First Families, the corporations and the Yakuza have a stranglehold on everything. Embarked on a journey of implacable retribution for a lost love, Kovacs is blown off course and into a maelstrom of political intrigue and technological mystery as the ghosts of Harlan's World and his own violent past rise to claim their due. Quellcrist Falconer is back from the dead, they say, and hunting her down for the First Families is a savage young Envoy called Kovacs who's been in storage… (more)

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» See also 37 mentions

English (38)  Italian (1)  French (1)  Finnish (1)  All languages (41)
Showing 1-5 of 38 (next | show all)
This review is also on Woken Furies (#2 and #3 in the Altered Carbon series)

First I read Altered Carbon and was so touched by it that I then read the other two in the series: Broken Angels and Woken Furies.

So during the day I am tooling around the Baltic: Russia, Finland, Sweden, then Germany. I am soaking up all this stuff from the past, most of it brilliant. By night, however, I am soaking up all this stuff from the future, all of it brilliant.

The main protagonist, Takeshi Kovacs, like all good mass murdering heroes, has some moral dilemmas about what he does for a living. The good thing about sci-fi is that it doesn’t get its head stuck up its arse Moral dilemmas are dealt with in a very pragmatic fashion that usually involves someone dying, sometimes the wrong person.

This is not the thinking person’s sci-fi, it is more the feeling person’s sci-fi. I am assuming in writing this that you also like sci-fi and have the same snobbish pretensions that I do.

One real stand out thing about this series is that it is racially blurring. Is Takeshi Kovacs black? or sometimes black? and sometimes Asian? or sometimes something else entirely? I ask that because it is not often in any book that the main protagonist is so very undefined that you cannot hang any racial stereotypes on his frame, benevolent or not. It remind me of something that I came across recently that said, “The body is only a garment, address the wearer not the cloak.” To all practical purposes it places the focus more directly on the character themselves and takes away any visualising you may (unconsciously) do to flesh them out. As a device I really liked it. Having said that, all the arseholes were quite clearly defined.

I cannot think of another genre that has to ride so much stigma from so-called “book people” than sci-fi. I recently read The Sense of an Ending by Julian Barnes, it is brilliant. I also read The Martian by Andy Weir it too, is brilliant.

Both are fiction, but one requires reading things like The Guardian or The New York Times and the other takes imagination. No Bookers for guessing which is which.

As an aside, a few years back I set myself the task of reading all the Booker winners. Man, apart from a few gems, most of them are like looking at your grandparents underwear. ( )
  Ken-Me-Old-Mate | Sep 24, 2020 |
This one was not as captivating as Morgan's other two. The most fascinating parts of Woken Furies are the ones that were hinted at, the sketches of world-building that seemed to flash by in an incomprehensible blur. The (self-evolving?) machines in the wreckage of abandoned New Hokkaido, or "New Hok,"; the orbital platforms no one can turn off that shoot anything out of the sky, the "unsettlement" uprising centuries prior...it's all there and it's all intriguing, but somewhat like the McGuffin of Broken Angels, it was never explored sufficiently. I want to know what happened, what's happening, what's about to happen on Takeshi Kovacs' homeworld of Harlan's World. That would have been a truly great story.

Kovacs, by this book, isn't even an endearing asshole; he's just an asshole, and a murderous anti-religious zealot (there's an extremely patriarchal religion in here that Kovacs wants to destroy every last adherent of). And yet, the horniness clearly radiating from Richard Morgan's pen in this one goes a bit too far, as does the outright lewdness and objectification that Kovacs(slash-Morgan?) engages in. It's almost as if the religious types want their women covered up in order to help them avoid the leering eyes of Kovacs and men like him.

Don't get me wrong, I didn't hate the book, but the most interesting parts were the least-explored, and the overall shtick of Kovacs has, by this book, worn thin. ( )
  goliathonline | Jul 7, 2020 |
I see a lot of mixed reactions to this book but fortunately, mine is all gung-ho. Why? Because I freaking love this book. Why? Because it has all the best features of the hardest of hard-SF, the fantastic world-building, the hard tech, the bloodthirsty craziness of uploaded and downloaded consciousnesses mixed with the mafia of all breeds and Oligarchies and corporations and all if it is mixed some of the tightest characters I've had the pleasure to read.

That doesn't really describe it, though.

The novel is an extremely complex homecoming for Kovacs, a returning to Harlan's World at long last. A hundred years of travels, war, exploration under shady circumstances under his belt, and his interesting outlook always getting him into serious trouble.

A death wish?

That's the big question, isn't it? All through the first two novels, he keeps engaging in super risky behavior such as falling in with traitors or con artists or government executives with dark secrets or just plain rebellions. His situational morality is honed to a very fine degree. :)

Take him back home and have him fall in with random strangers and you'll never believe how much trouble he gets into. Or the scope of the trouble.

Those alien artifacts are still around and causing trouble. The one over Harlan's World is a wonderful wrinkle in the worldbuilding. :) No spoilers, but I was blown away by the sheer weight of the complex storytelling propelled like a rocket named Kovacs. :)

All those little hints and reveals from the first book and the tv series really comes home to shine in this book. Did I mention that there is a lot of really great and complex storytelling going on here? Not just mirroring and externalizing of self-hate or the complications of the tech, but love, humor, and ... screw it. Just read it. :)

I'm going to hunt down some hardcover copies of this trilogy. I want to showcase them and re-read them at extended leisure. :) ( )
  bradleyhorner | Jun 1, 2020 |
Takeshi Kovacs is back on Harlan’s World and working on a path of revenge for the death of a friend. After crossing paths with the Yakuza he decides to hid out for a few months doing some mercenary work cleaning up the battlefield from 300 years ago that is still active due to weapons used. The book deals with the history of Harlan’s World and Quellcrist Falconer and due to resleeving and tech, 300 years isn’t that long ago. Takeshi isn’t the warm cuddly hero in this series but the story is good and the universe detailed and compelling. I would like to see more in this universe even if it isn’t with him as the main character. ( )
  Glennis.LeBlanc | Jan 6, 2020 |
Great read. A complex story finishing the Takeshi Kovacs trilogy. RM rmeshes numerous events and characters from a settled planet in a future that is terrifying in its meshing of technology w man. TK fights alingside and against interchangeable bodies and evolving bio-tech altered humans trying to salvage some human dignity. ( )
  JBreedlove | Jan 28, 2019 |
Showing 1-5 of 38 (next | show all)
Morgan not only delivers what he proved extremely efficient on in his previous novels, which is: Hollywood-style action, laconic one-liners, heaps of manslaughter and a fast-paced, darting-around plot; he also shows new qualities and such that have been only vaguely discernible until now.
 
The culmination of everything Richard Morgan has been building towards since he began his Takeshi Kovacs novels in 2002, Woken Furies is better than both Altered Carbon and Broken Angels by an order of magnitude. Lacking both the first novel's derivative obsession with style and the second's unredeeming, bleak worldview, Woken Furies marries breathtaking suspense and action with a more consistent and intellectually fulfilling plot that explores the dynamics of power and consequences of revolution from a perspective neither idealistic nor overly cynical and jaundiced. Furthermore, Takeshi Kovacs himself comes into his own as a hero, not merely a long-black-coat clad, boilerplate antihero; this is the first volume of the saga where I found him, at last, a likable and relatable character.
 
Faisons simple, le principal élément moteur de Furies Déchaînées, c’est l’action. Bagarres, fuites, fusillades, sexe... Richard Morgan fait tout pour ne pas laisser un seul instant de répits au lecteur. Un lecteur qui va de scène d’action en scène d’action au point parfois d’être un peu perdu dans ce mélange de gros muscles, de zones de guerre, d’éléments cyberpunk et quelques gouttes de polar. Un fourre-tout qui donne un peu le tournis... il faut reconnaître à Richard Morgan un vrai don pour décrire des ambiances dures et âpres qui ont le mérite d’être accrocheuses. Un vrai bon auteur, un peu rentre-dedans et très prometteur. Ceux d’entre vous qui ont lu les deux premiers tomes des aventures de Kovacs seront sans doute ravis de le retrouver et d’en savoir un peu plus sur lui. Attention pour les autres à ne pas se perdre dans les entrelacs d’une intrigue parfois épaisse.
 

» Add other authors (6 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Richard K. Morganprimary authorall editionscalculated
Dufris, WilliamNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Moore, ChrisCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed

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Fury (n): 1a intense, disordered and often destructive rage... 2 wild, disordered force or activity 3a any of the three avenging deities who in Greek mythology punished crimes 3b an angry or vengeful woman The New Penguin English Dictionary, 2001
Dedication
This book is for my wife, Virginia Cottinelli, who knows of impediment.
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The place they woke me in would have been carefully prepared. (prologue)
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Impaler drifted in sideways toward an unused section of the dock. Her grapples fired and chewed holes in the evercrete. A couple of them hit rotten patches and tugged loose as soon as they started to crank taut. The hovelolader backed off slightly in a mound of stirred-up water and shredded belaweed. The grapples wound back and fired again. Something behind me wailed. At first, some stupid part of me thought it was Virginia Vidaura finally venting her pent-up grief. A fraction of a second later I caught up with the machine tone of the sound and identified it for what it was - an alarm. Time seemed to slam to a halt. Seconds turned into ponderous slabs of perception; everything moved with the lazy calm of motion underwater. - Liebeck, spinning away from the water's edge, lit spliff tumbling from her open mouth, bouncing off the upper slope of her breast in a brief splutter of embers - - Murakami, yelling at my ear, moving past me toward the grav sled - The monitor system built into the sled screaming, a whole rack of data coil systems flaring to life like candles along one side of Sylvie Oshima's suddenly twitching body - Sylvie's eyes, wide open and fixed on mine as the gravity of her stare drags my own gaze in - The alarm, unfamiliar as the new Tseng hardware, but only one possible meaning behind it - And Murakami's arm, raised, hand filled with the Kalashnikov as he clears it from his belt - My own yell, stretching out and blending with his as I throw myself foward to block him, hands still bound, hoplesessly slow - And then the clouds ripped open in the east, and vomited angelfire. And the dock lit up with light and fury. And the sky fell in.
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This is high action, ideas driven noir SF of the highest order. Morgan has already established himself as an SF author of global significance. Takeshi Kovacs has come home. Home to Harlan's World. An ocean planet with only 5% of its landmass poking above the dangerous and unpredictable seas. Try and get above the weather in anything more sophisticated than a helicopter and the Martian orbital platforms will burn you out of the sky. And death doesn't just wait for you in the seas and the skies. On land, from the tropical beaches and swamps of Kossuth to the icy, machine-infested wastes of New Hokkaido the hard won gains of the Quellist revolution have been lost. The First Families, the corporations and the Yakuza have a stranglehold on everything. Embarked on a journey of implacable retribution for a lost love, Kovacs is blown off course and into a maelstrom of political intrigue and technological mystery as the ghosts of Harlan's World and his own violent past rise to claim their due. Quellcrist Falconer is back from the dead, they say, and hunting her down for the First Families is a savage young Envoy called Kovacs who's been in storage

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