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Iron Sunrise (Ace Science Fiction) (original 2004; edition 2005)

by Charles Stross

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Member:datagrok
Title:Iron Sunrise (Ace Science Fiction)
Authors:Charles Stross
Info:Ace (2005), Paperback, 448 pages
Collections:Your library
Rating:****
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Iron Sunrise by Charles Stross (2004)

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» See also 17 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 27 (next | show all)
The sequel novel to _Singularity Sky_, with the same good set of science-fictional ideas as background. But, for me, there's too much savagery, depravity, vulgarity, and complication in the plot.
  fpagan | Apr 5, 2014 |
I liked this one much more than Accelerando, and liked some of the characters, but it still didn't warm me up much to this guy's writing. ( )
  shanaqui | Apr 9, 2013 |
This is a science fiction thriller set in a future in which there is a nearly godlike power, the Eschaton, which is policing the human-settled worlds (indeed, which has settled much of the galaxy for its own reasons). Not everyone is happy about this, and one group of people, the ReMastered, wants to replace the Eschaton with their own god-from-the-machine. It is a rather interesting, and less-than-altogether-pleasant future. The Singularity does not mean that we all transcend. Not-god's name is Herman...
  Fledgist | May 20, 2012 |
(Reprinted from the Chicago Center for Literature and Photography [cclapcenter.com]. I am the original author of this essay, as well as the owner of CCLaP; it is not being reprinted illegally.)

Regular visitors will know that I'm currently in the process of reading every novel sci-fi author Charles Stross has ever written; I started last time with his very first, 2003's Singularity Sky, which told a surprisingly funny and absurdist tale set in the far future, centuries after the human race was split and flung across the universe one day by a far advanced alien life form, because of a united humanity recently discovering time travel and thus technically now capable of accidentally wiping out this "Eschaton"s very existence. And this is the same universe where his next novel is set as well, 2004's Iron Sunrise, although it's not exactly a sequel; for although it features the same duo of main heroes as the first book (a plucky female UN inspector and a male secret agent for the Eschaton, the two now married after falling in love in the first novel), the story itself takes place among an entirely different planetary system, basically starting with the unexpected explosion of a local star and the destruction of the world orbiting it (the "iron sunrise" of the book's title), which leads us down an ever-widening rabbithole of conspiracies, ultra-fascist organizations, and galaxy-domination plots.

And indeed, the either good or bad news, depending on what you think of the subject, is that Iron Sunrise adheres much more strongly to the traditional tropes of 1990s and early 2000s cyberpunk, after a first novel that cleverly combined hard science-fiction with the gonzo silliness of countercultural "motley fool" writers like Ken Kesey; the latter now features such familiar genre touches as a rebellious 15-year-old girl as our main protagonist, five or six different small storylines that all come together into one giant climax at the end, spaceship chases and planet-hopping bloggers and all the other things you would expect from a SF tale written in those years. (Also, this second novel makes it clear that the Eschaton is actually a single entity, essentially the result of a cloud computing system like the Google server farm gaining sentience; and while that helps make things clearer from a plot standpoint, I admit that it kind of removes the fun in the first novel of never quite knowing what exactly the Eschaton is/are.) Still, although far from his best or densest or trippiest work, Iron Sunrise is definitely an interesting read and worth the time of Stross completists; although I have to confess that I'm looking much more forward to the next title in my reading list, 2005's Accelerando, the first of Stross's books to make a big splash in America and coiner of the entire cultural phrase "The Accelerated Age" (a popular way among SF fans to refer to stories that take place in a post-Singularity universe). ( )
  jasonpettus | Mar 16, 2012 |
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» Add other authors (5 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Charles Strossprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Ducak, DaniloCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Gibbons, LeeCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0441012965, Mass Market Paperback)

A G2 star doesn't just explode - not without outside interference. So the survivors of the planet Moscow, which was annihilated in just such an event, have launched a counterattack against the most likely culprit: the neighboring system of New Dresden. But New Dresden wasn't responsible, and as deadly missiles approach their target, Rachel Mansour, agent for the interests of Old Earth, is assigned to find out who was. Opposing her is an unknown - an unimaginable - enemy. At stake is not only the fate of New Dresden, but also the very order of the universe." And the one person who knows the identity of that enemy is a disaffected teenager who calls herself Wednesday Shadowmist. But Wednesday has no idea what she knows.

(retrieved from Amazon Mon, 30 Sep 2013 14:04:35 -0400)

(see all 3 descriptions)

"A G2 star doesn't just explode - not without outside interference. So the survivors of the planet Moscow, which was annihilated in just such an event, have launched a counterattack against the most likely culprit: the neighboring system of New Dresden." "But New Dresden wasn't responsible, and as deadly missiles approach their target, Rachel Mansour, agent for the interests of Old Earth, is assigned to find out who was. Opposing her is an unknown - an unimaginable - enemy. At stake is not only the fate of New Dresden, but also the very order of the universe." "And the one person who knows the identity of that enemy is a disaffected teenager who calls herself Wednesday Shadowmist. But Wednesday has no idea what she knows."--BOOK JACKET.… (more)

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