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Generation of Vipers by Philip Wylie
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Generation of Vipers (original 1942; edition 1996)

by Philip Wylie

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1751107,008 (3.83)6
Perhaps the most vitriolic attack ever launched on the American way of living--from politicians to professors to businessmen to Mom to sexual mores to religion--"Generation of Vipers"?ranks with the works of De Tocqueville and Emerson in defining the American character and malaise.
Member:LolaWalser
Title:Generation of Vipers
Authors:Philip Wylie
Info:Dalkey Archive Press (1996), Edition: 2nd, Paperback, 331 pages
Collections:g, 14
Rating:1/2
Tags:criticism of everything, rants, United States, 1940s, 1950s, WWII, conservatism, misogyny

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Generation of Vipers: newly annotated by the author by Philip Wylie (1942)

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» See also 6 mentions

This book impressed me as a teenager. Dystopian novels are not a new phenomena! ( )
  Schallon | Mar 27, 2012 |
Picking it up again after four decades, I remembered little about it except (of course) mom and a general atmosphere of splenetic outrage. As it turned out, "Generation of Vipers" did not come through a second reading in very good shape. The spectacle of someone making an absolute fool of himself is always enjoyable, so watching Wylie put himself through these ridiculous paces was amusing, but "Generation of Vipers" is warmed-over H.L. Mencken with only occasional hints of Mencken's wit or perspicacity. Along the way Wylie says a few smart things, but give a chimpanzee 100,000 words and one or two of them are likely, against all odds, to make a bit of sense. Mostly the book is high-octane twaddle, fun to read but incapable of withstanding close scrutiny.
 
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