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Republic Studios: Between Poverty Row and…
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Republic Studios: Between Poverty Row and the Majors (1979)

by Richard Maurice Hurst

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A historical look at Republic Studios from the early days of the serials to the studio’s 1959 demise as a motion picture studio. While the studio continues to exist on paper, its regularly-optioned inventory gives television viewers a glimpse into the studio’s history.

The book examines the studio’s influence on Hollywood’s B films, on the serials, and on westerns in which stars such as Roy Rogers and Gene Autry regularly appeared. Several listings appear as appendices, including listings of the Republic serials, the Three Mesquiteer series, Republic appearances by both Gene Autry and Roy Rogers, and other series films produced by the studio. An extensive bibliography is also included.

This glimpse into the inner workings of Republic Studios is perfect for film history buffs as well as for those with an interest in the early days of the Hollywood studios.

Recommended. ( )
  jfe16 | Jan 18, 2019 |
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The Hollywood studios of the 1930s, '40s, and '50s were rarely concerned with film as an art form; this was especially true of those specializing in the B film. Of these, Republic Pictures Corporation was the finest. Their quality B action pictures and serials influenced the industry and the moviegoing public, resulting in greater public acceptance. The Republic's roster of talent included John Wayne, Roy Rogers, and Gene Autry, and the serials it produced featured such iconic figures as Dick Tracy, Captain America, Zorro, and The Lone Ranger. In Republic Studios: Between Poverty Row and the Majors, author Richard Hurst documents the influence and significance of this major B studio. Originally published in 1979, this book provides a brief overview of the studio's economic structure and charts its output. Hurst examines the various genres represented by the studio, including the comedies of Judy Canova and westerns featuring Autry, Rogers, and The Three Mesquiteers. The book addresses the non-series B films Republic produced, as well as rare A films such as Wake of the Red Witch, Sands of Iwo Jima, and John Ford's The Quiet Man, all of which starred John Wayne. This new edition of Republic Studios, with two additional expanded chapters on serials, a new introduction, and an epilogue, brings the Republic story up to date. This fascinating look at Republic chronicles the impact the studio had on American cultural history from the mid-1940s to the mid-1950s and examines the studio's role in Hollywood history and its demise in the late '50s.… (more)

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