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You look like a thing and i love you : how…
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You look like a thing and i love you : how artificial intelligence works… (edition 2019)

by Janelle Shane

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1023197,718 (4.31)5
AS HEARD ON NPR'S "SCIENCE FRIDAY" Discover the book that Malcolm Gladwell, Susan Cain, Daniel Pink, and Adam Grant want you to read this year, an "accessible, informative, and hilarious" introduction to the weird and wonderful world of artificial intelligence (Ryan North). "You look like a thing and I love you" is one of the best pickup lines ever... according to an artificial intelligence trained by scientist Janelle Shane, creator of the popular blog AI Weirdness. She creates silly AIs that learn how to name paint colors, create the best recipes, and even flirt (badly) with humans--all to understand the technology that governs so much of our daily lives. We rely on AI every day for recommendations, for translations, and to put cat ears on our selfie videos. We also trust AI with matters of life and death, on the road and in our hospitals. But how smart is AI really... and how does it solve problems, understand humans, and even drive self-driving cars? Shane delivers the answers to every AI question you've ever asked, and some you definitely haven't. Like, how can a computer design the perfect sandwich? What does robot-generated Harry Potter fan-fiction look like? And is the world's best Halloween costume really "Vampire Hog Bride"? In this smart, often hilarious introduction to the most interesting science of our time, Shane shows how these programs learn, fail, and adapt--and how they reflect the best and worst of humanity. You Look Like a Thing and I Love You is the perfect book for anyone curious about what the robots in our lives are thinking. "I can't think of a better way to learn about artificial intelligence, and I've never had so much fun along the way." - Adam Grant, New York Times bestselling author of Originals … (more)
Member:violistpm
Title:You look like a thing and i love you : how artificial intelligence works and why it's making the world a weirder place
Authors:Janelle Shane
Info:New York : Little, Brown and Company, 2019.
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You Look Like a Thing and I Love You by Janelle Shane

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» See also 5 mentions

Showing 3 of 3
I sort of thought by the title it would be about anthropomorphism, but the subtitle is “How Artificial Intelligence Works and Why It’s Making the World a Weirder Place.” Along with cute illustrations, the book explains pretty much that, at a high level, along with what AI is and isn’t good for. AI is particularly not good at resisting targeted attacks; stickers or changes in pixels can change “gun” to “toaster” in AI vision, and—attention, fic writers—“a low-security fingerprint reader can be fooled 77 percent of the time with a single master fingerprint.” Like people, AI is lazy, so when you try to train it to recognize skin diseases, it will instead learn the easier trick of recognizing the rulers that are often in the picture with actual cancers, which is clever from its perspective but not from ours. That’s also how it learns to replicate human biases (in favor of men, against people who went to HBCUs, etc.). If you use the same camera to take pictures of the training set of “right” answers, then it may learn to use the camera metadata instead, although my favorite examples were the AIs that learned to exploit features of the training system, e.g. anomalies in the modeling of physics that allowed them to accumulate infinite force or crash the system when they were about to lose or even hack into the answer key and award themselves right answers. AI, that is, is very much like Captain Kirk and the Kobayashi Maru. Also for authors: there are certain training datasets that lots of systems use. If you managed to submit enough samples to those databases to corrupt them—maybe 5%--you could make your adversarial attacks on the system succeed. This vulnerability also suggests big problems of overfitting—the training set matters too much and the algorithm too little. Also: you could hack voice-to-AI systems so that a human would hear one thing and the AI system would hear something very different. Fic possibilities, worrying realities. One last tidbit to ponder: we so much don’t know how algorithms learn that when people are assigned to circle the part of a picture that helps them figure out what’s in the picture, algorithmic performance goes down, so either people are wrong about how they recognize dogs (etc.) or something even stranger is going on. On the plus side, made me kind of want to write Leverage fic? ( )
1 vote rivkat | Sep 1, 2020 |
This is a layman’s introduction to how AI works and what it can and cannot do. It’s a really fun read - it’s full of really silly examples of AI’s messing up in hilarious ways (such as an AI that was told to move from point A to point B, and it decided the best way to get there was to make itself as tall as the distance between the two points and then fall over).

The big takeaways for me were (1) that even AI researchers don’t always understand how AI works, and (2) that AI is nowhere near as magical and capable as AI companies would have you think.

AI is already a big part of our daily lives, and is going to continue to be more and more important. It's also important that we understand what AI is and what it can and cannot do - right now a lot of tech companies are making a lot of money by selling us an AI-driven future where everything is easy and computers can solve all of our problems, but this book makes it very (hilariously) clear that an AI-driven future is going to be weird and buggy, and that AI has the potential to be very problematic if not used correctly. ( )
  Gwendydd | Aug 22, 2020 |
A very theoretical introduction and digest of different types of AI; a comprehensive (if sometimes convoluted and repetitive) overview of the technology; its promise and limitations. Uses hypotheticals and analogies to explain AI in theory. Explains why AI isn’t practically possible let alone effective without human engagement and how, often, the technology depends on massive quantities, and, precise qualities, of (sometimes scarce) underlying data.

One of the points the book makes is that AI is not trying to find the right solution but what a human would have done. The book's comparison of AI to worms' intelligence is flawed because according to recent revelations worms are intelligent enough to have free will, unlike AI. AI seems eons away, in fact, of exhibiting any such facility.

The tone is very approachable, and emphasizes that AI is more artificial than intelligence. Don’t expect any practical experience however, this is not an AI tutorial or workbook, not even an introductory one. If you are interested in AI but don’t know how or where to begin, this may be a good (if slow) start, but if you are looking for a deep dive, this is probably is not the book for you.
  AAAO | Jun 20, 2020 |
Showing 3 of 3
In her first book, You Look Like a Thing and I Love You, Janelle Shane assures us that AI is more like a toaster than like Skynet from Terminator. It’s a tool—one that is really good at some things and really, really terrible at others. This accessible guide to AI and machine learning cuts through the techno-hype and shows how AI is making the world a stranger place.
added by aspirit | editBookPage, Janelle Shane (Nov 5, 2019)
 
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AS HEARD ON NPR'S "SCIENCE FRIDAY" Discover the book that Malcolm Gladwell, Susan Cain, Daniel Pink, and Adam Grant want you to read this year, an "accessible, informative, and hilarious" introduction to the weird and wonderful world of artificial intelligence (Ryan North). "You look like a thing and I love you" is one of the best pickup lines ever... according to an artificial intelligence trained by scientist Janelle Shane, creator of the popular blog AI Weirdness. She creates silly AIs that learn how to name paint colors, create the best recipes, and even flirt (badly) with humans--all to understand the technology that governs so much of our daily lives. We rely on AI every day for recommendations, for translations, and to put cat ears on our selfie videos. We also trust AI with matters of life and death, on the road and in our hospitals. But how smart is AI really... and how does it solve problems, understand humans, and even drive self-driving cars? Shane delivers the answers to every AI question you've ever asked, and some you definitely haven't. Like, how can a computer design the perfect sandwich? What does robot-generated Harry Potter fan-fiction look like? And is the world's best Halloween costume really "Vampire Hog Bride"? In this smart, often hilarious introduction to the most interesting science of our time, Shane shows how these programs learn, fail, and adapt--and how they reflect the best and worst of humanity. You Look Like a Thing and I Love You is the perfect book for anyone curious about what the robots in our lives are thinking. "I can't think of a better way to learn about artificial intelligence, and I've never had so much fun along the way." - Adam Grant, New York Times bestselling author of Originals

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