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Persepolis: The Story of a Childhood (edition 2004)

by Marjane Satrapi

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
6,104235672 (4.18)313
Member:teatiemz
Title:Persepolis: The Story of a Childhood
Authors:Marjane Satrapi
Info:Pantheon (2004), Edition: Reprint, Paperback, 160 pages
Collections:Your library
Rating:*****
Tags:None

Work details

Persepolis I : The Story of a Childhood by Marjane Satrapi

  1. 90
    Fun Home: A Family Tragicomic by Alison Bechdel (teelgee)
  2. 70
    Maus II: A Survivor's Tale: And Here My Troubles Began by Art Spiegelman (Tjarda)
  3. 40
    Reading Lolita in Tehran by Azar Nafisi (Eustrabirbeonne)
  4. 30
    A Thousand Splendid Suns by Khaled Hosseini (Eustrabirbeonne)
  5. 30
    Journey from the Land of No: A Girlhood Caught in Revolutionary Iran by Roya Hakakian (cransell)
    cransell: A complementary (non-graphic) look at growing up in Iran during the Revolution.
  6. 20
    The Rabbi's Cat by Joann Sfar (Eustrabirbeonne)
  7. 20
    Psychiatric Tales: Eleven Graphic Stories About Mental Illness by Darryl Cunningham (vnovak)
    vnovak: In the introduction to Psychiatric Tales, Darryl Cunningham said that he was inspired to write it after reading Persepolis. They share a spare, black and white style and a empathetic view of difficult topics.
  8. 10
    Nylon Road: A Graphic Memoir of Coming of Age in Iran by Parsua Bashi (elvisettey)
    elvisettey: Another coming-of-age memoir in Iran.
  9. 10
    The House of the Mosque by Kader Abdolah (souloftherose)
    souloftherose: Both books show the effects of the Iranian Revolution of 1979 on Iranian families. The House of the Mosque shows its effect on a Muslim family whereas Persepolis shows its effect on a more secular family. Both authors are writing from their own experience… (more)
  10. 10
    Stitches: A Memoir by David Small (jlparent)
    jlparent: Another wonderfully done graphic novel memoir about a difficult childhood.
  11. 10
    Forget Sorrow: An Ancestral Tale by Belle Yang (VaterOlsen)
  12. 10
    My Father's Notebook by Kader Abdolah (Tjarda)
  13. 10
    Epileptic by David B. (yabyak)
  14. 00
    Blankets by Craig Thompson (Hibou8)
  15. 00
    Die Birnen von Ribbeck by Friedrich Christian Delius (EerierIdyllMeme)
    EerierIdyllMeme: Life at a personal level under various political regimes, told in an unconventional way.
  16. 00
    When I Was Puerto Rican by Esmeralda Santiago (jilld17)
  17. 00
    Memed, My Hawk by Yashar Kemal (Eustrabirbeonne)
  18. 00
    The Heartbreak Diet: A Story of Family, Fidelity, and Starting Over by Thorina Rose (makaiju)
    makaiju: Another autobiographical graphic novel :-p that's a mouthful!
  19. 11
    Mostly Miniatures: An Introduction to Persian Painting by Oleg Grabar (Eustrabirbeonne)
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» See also 313 mentions

English (230)  Danish (2)  Swedish (1)  Japanese (1)  Dutch (1)  All languages (235)
Showing 1-5 of 230 (next | show all)
A very cool graphic novel autobiography. It's painful and funny to read, to watch the Marjane Satrapi grow up and go through different stages during the war. ( )
  BrynDahlquis | Nov 24, 2014 |
Persepolis is a graphic novel about a young girl, Marjane, growing up during Iran's Islamic Revolution. It is a true story! Marjane wants to end the war because she doesn't want anymore people to die or any more of her town to be destroyed.

Marjane was very brave! For example, she wanted to wear western style clothes but the Shah's regime said women must wear burkas. She wore her high tops and jean jacket anyways even though that almost got her killed!

This book may look like a fun comic book but it is actually very serious. It shows acts of violence such as whippings and torture and repression such as the government mandating what you must wear and how you are allowed to wear your hair that demonstrate the human cost of war. However, it also shows the resiliency of the human spirit. A resiliency we all carry with us. For example, the ability to laugh through our tears in this case at the absurdity of war. ( )
  KendallCH | Oct 19, 2014 |
I enjoyed Persepolis and learned a great deal about events that happened when I was but a child myself. Marjane manages to capture the humanity of her friends and family in the middle of chaotic times. While the subject matter and presentation are very similar to the Maus books by Spiegelman, I think that Persepolis is more effective in its story telling because the people are left people for the good and the bad. ( )
  pussreboots | Oct 6, 2014 |
Okay, so it's a graphic novel. But a) it's quite good, and b) I'm going to more than make up for any possible "lack of weightiness" by the end of this year, I promise. I've seen excerpts from this book pretty much everywhere, it seems like it was one of the most buzzed about graphic novels from last year. I exchanged a duplicate gift for it in Colorado Springs over the holidays and read it on the way home. I recommend it highly. If you've been living under a rock and haven't heard anything about this book, it's an autobiographical account of growing up as a girl in Iran -- her experiences during the revolution and after which when Islamic leaders took over the country, and the beginning of the war with Iraq. Supposedly there is a sequel in the works? ( )
  greeniezona | Sep 20, 2014 |
I'm still not a fan of graphic novels, but this one was well done. I had heard great reviews and so decided to try it. The format helps to lighten the really tragic story. I'm not sure I could have stuck with this in a regular print book. The graphics were a break to the dark and heavy tale. I'm glad I read it. I learned something. ( )
  njcur | Sep 17, 2014 |
Showing 1-5 of 230 (next | show all)
Satrapi’s style is almost primitive, consisting of flat figures with simple shapes and features. It’s more sophisticated than a child’s creations, but it superficially resembles them, an approach that supports the presentation of memories from that period of life.
 
Marjane Satrapi's ''Persepolis'' is the latest and one of the most delectable examples of a booming postmodern genre: autobiography by comic book.
 

» Add other authors (35 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Marjane Satrapiprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Aarne, TainaTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Epigraph
Dedication
To my parents
First words
This is me when I was 10 years old. This was in 1980.
Quotations
EXCEPT FOR MY GRANDMOTHER I WAS OBVIOUSLY THE ONLY ONE WHO BELIEVED IN MYSELF.
IT WAS FUNNY TO SEE HOW MUCH MARX AND GOD LOOKED LIKE EACH OTHER. THOUGH MARX'S HAIR WAS A BIT CURLIER.
TO EACH HIS OWN WAY OF CALMING DOWN.
Last words
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
Persepolis was originally published in 4 volumes. Some later editions, especially in the U.S., combined volumes 1-2 into one work Persepolis: The Story of a Childhood; volumes 3-4 were combined into Persepolis: The Story of a Return. Keep this in mind when combining/separating.

This entry needs a bit of cleaning up, since this the French edition, which is the first of four (the amazon.com entry listed 76 pages, which is correct for the first of four volumes in French). However, many of the reviews contain material from later in the series, and the last words in English appear not to be the last words of the first of four volumes.
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References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English (2)

Book description
Originally published to wide critical acclaim in France, where it elicited comparisons to Art Spiegelman's Maus, Persepolis is Marjane Satrapi's wise, funny, and heartbreaking memoir of growing up in Iran during the Islamic Revolution. In powerful black-and-white comic strip images, Satrapi tells the story of her life in Tehran from ages six to fourteen, years that saw the overthrow of the Shah's regime, the triumph of the Islamic Revolution, and the devastating effects of war with Iraq. The intelligent and outspoken only child of committed Marxists and the great-granddaughter of one of Iran's last emperors, Marjane bears witness to a childhood uniquely entwined with the history of her country.

Persepolis paints an unforgettable portrait of daily life in Iran: of the bewildering contradictions between home life and public life and of the enormous toll repressive regimes exact on the individual spirit. Marjane's child's-eye-view of dethroned emperors, state-sanctioned whippings, and heroes of the revolution allows us to learn as she does the history of this fascinating country and of her own extraordinary family. Intensely personal, profoundly political, and wholly original, Persepolis is at once a story of growing up and a stunning reminder of the human cost of war and political repression. It shows how we carry on, through laughter and tears, in the face of absurdity. And, finally, it introduces us to an irresistible little girl with whom we cannot help but fall in love.
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No descriptions found.

An intelligent and outspoken only child, Satrapi--the daughter of radical Marxists and the great-granddaughter of Iran's last emperor--bears witness to a childhood uniquely entwined with the history of her country. Originally published to wide critical acclaim in France, where it elicited comparisons to Art Spiegelman's Maus, Persepolis is Marjane Satrapi's wise, funny, and heartbreaking memoir of growing up in Iran during the Islamic Revolution. In powerful black-and-white comic strip images, Satrapi tells the story of her life in Tehran from ages six to fourteen, years that saw the overthrow of the Shah's regime, the triumph of the Islamic Revolution, and the devastating effects of war with Iraq. The intelligent and outspoken only child of committed Marxists and the great-granddaughter of one of Iran's last emperors, Marjane bears witness to a childhood uniquely entwined with the history of her country. Persepolis paints an unforgettable portrait of daily life in Iran: of the bewildering contradictions between home life and public life and of the enormous toll repressive regimes exact on the individual spirit. Marjane's child's-eye-view of dethroned emperors, state-sanctioned whippings, and heroes of the revolution allows us to learn as she does the history of this fascinating country and of her own extraordinary family. Intensely personal, profoundly political, and wholly original, Persepolis is at once a story of growing up and a stunning reminder of the human cost of war and political repression. It shows how we carry on, through laughter and tears, in the face of absurdity. And, finally, it introduces us to an irresistible little girl with whom we cannot help but fall in love.… (more)

(summary from another edition)

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