HomeGroupsTalkMoreZeitgeist
Have you checked out SantaThing, LibraryThing's gift-giving tradition?
dismiss
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Loading...

Book Lust: Recommended Reading for Every Mood, Moment, and Reason (2003)

by Nancy Pearl

Series: Book Lust (1)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
2,435564,351 (3.96)193
What to read next is every book lover's greatest dilemma. Nancy Pearl comes to the rescue with this wide-ranging and fun guide to the best reading new and old. Pearl, who inspired legions of litterateurs with "What If All (name the city) Read the Same Book," has devised reading lists that cater to every mood, occasion, and personality. These annotated lists cover such topics as mother-daughter relationships, science for nonscientists, mysteries of all stripes, African-American fiction from a female point of view, must-reads for kids, books on bicycling, "chick-lit," and many more. Pearl's enthusiasm and taste shine throughout.… (more)
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 193 mentions

English (55)  Swedish (1)  All languages (56)
Showing 1-5 of 55 (next | show all)
Of her two books, this first one is the better one. One has to give Ms. Pearl credit for being such a voracious reader and for parlaying it into a career. She also deserves credit for encouraging people to read for pleasure and to find what works for them. The book does have some misses, some which I have jotted down in my updates here such as lumping scifi, fantasy, and horror in one section. Maybe it irked me because I am a reader in those genres, and I think they deserve their own treatment, not a shotgun approach. However, the book is good for readers needing ideas on what to read next. Whether you agree or disagree with some of her selections, you are bound to find something you like in these pages. It is definitely a book worth browsing and keeping handy on your shelf. It is not, however, perfect, and I guess I only say that because librarians tend to put Nancy Pearl on this pedestal as the all-knowing reader's advisor. The woman is certainly knowledgeable, but as I said, the book did have a couple of misses. In spite of that, I did find a couple of good ideas for future reading selections, so it balances out. ( )
  bloodravenlib | Aug 17, 2020 |
It's great to find a book to get good reading recommendations, even if they are a bit dated. It was published in 2003.
It's organized into 175 creative, useful lists. She gives her comments on the books, anointing her favourites, so saving you a lot of disappointment with blind choices.
One tip in her introduction I appreciated, she calls it her "rule of fifty"
A guideline of how much of a book to read before discarding it.
To quote from pages xi-xii
One of my strongest-held beliefs is that no one should ever finish a book that they're not enjoying, no matter how popular or well reviewed the book is. Believe me, nobody is going to get any points in heaven by slogging their way through a book they aren't enjoying but think they ought to read. I live by what I call "the rule of fifty" which acknowledges that time is short and the world of books is immense. If you're fifty years old or younger, give every book about fifty pages before you decide to commit yourself to reading it, or give it up. If you're over fifty, which is when time gets even shorter, subtract your age from 100—the result is the number of pages you should read before deciding. Keep in mind that your mood has a lot to do with whether or not you will like a boa. I always leave open the option of going back to a book that I haven't liked (especially if someone I respect has recommended it to me) sometime later. I've begun many books, put them down unfinished, then returned a month or two, or years, later and ended up loving them. This happened with Matthew Kneale's English Passengers, John Crowley's Little, Big, and Andrea Barrett's The Voyage of the Narwhal.

She has written two other books like it:
- More Book Lust (2005)
- Book Lust To Go (2010) ( )
  GeoffSC | Jul 25, 2020 |
I mean, did I "read" this "books to read" book? These things mostly operate as big recommendation engines -- a leg on a greater anal, autistic (and more than slightly disqualifying, I would think) Journey through Literature, of which this account occupies no negligible place. Pearl: many recs, albeit clearly those of a librarian (for good and ill); Boxall: if you only have 150 words for each, stop spending the whole time just summarizing the shit; Mustich: at least there's an identifiable critical (?) voice here. ( )
  Ebenmaessiger | Oct 5, 2019 |
One of the most interesting ''book about books'' I've had the pleasure to read. Nancy Pearl divides different themes, structural techniques, genres and authors, in alphabetical order, and each one of the chapters is accompanied by a comprehensive list of suggestive readings. Her writing is comprehensive and flowing, and although, I thought that she missed some books that are ''landmarks'' in a few of the genres, she brings to focus many less-read novels and non-fiction books. Perfect for those of us who wish to broaden their reading material a bit and discover new literary worlds. Enjoy! ( )
  AmaliaGavea | Jul 15, 2018 |
First, the title. How could a reader not love the title Book Lust? Paired with the enchanting cover, it's a perfect cover/package deal that immediately drew my eye. I really need to find more books ABOUT books, and have several on my wishlist.

Nancy Pearl is an admirable woman - the intro to the book is one of more interesting parts as she discusses having a troubled childhood and using books as a path of escape. She emphasizes the second home she made in her local library and the respect gathered for the local librarians, who inspired her so much she became a librarian herself.

I have go into something here - I keep seeing everywhere on here that elsewhere Nancy Pearl's words of wisdom on giving a book a chance, and most of it is listed as wrong. Even the sequel lists this in the plot description of it:

..."and her Rule of 50 (give a book 50 pages before deciding whether to continue; but readers over 50 must read the same number of pages as their age) became a standard MO."

It actually reads from her book:

"I live by what I call "the rule of fifty," which acknowledges that time is short and the world of books is immense. If you're fifty years old or younger, give every book about fifty pages before you decide to commit yourself to reading it, or give it up. If you're over fifty, which is when time gets even shorter, subtract your age from 100 - the result is the number of pages you should read before deciding."

I love the categories in the book, and they're broken down into an amazing ensemble of categories. A qualm I hold is I wish she would have gone more in-depth with some sections and their books. Sometimes it's listing them as a mere list.

I liked how she describes blending Horror, Fantasy, and Science-Fiction: "Science fiction deals with the world of the possible, if not the probable; fantasy deals with another world, one that doesn't conform to the natural laws of the world in which we live; and horror fiction (often referred to as dark fantasy) depicts a world marked by unnatural terrors." Even with this cool description, she admits to not really being a horror fan and not even reading Stephen King books.

One thing I notice is, while she rarely mentions a book twice in any list, she has now brought up Pat Conroy's Prince of Tides at least 4-5 categories now. I've heard good things about it and the movie was enjoyable. Thankfully I own it TBR. She apparently thought it was so intriguing I just "bumped it" up to read much sooner.

I recognized some of the titles in the lists, but honestly most of the stuff she mentions was unrecognizable to me. My wishlist grew though, and I became interested in being open minded to more subjects. It's amazing that she's read so many books on so many subjects, good grief.

This is more of a guide/list/reference than something that you sit down and enjoy reading. I do wish it were a bit more organized sometimes, more details were given for many of the books, and more explanations on some things.






( )
  ErinPaperbackstash | Jun 14, 2016 |
Showing 1-5 of 55 (next | show all)
no reviews | add a review

Belongs to Series

You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
Introduction
I love to read. And while I might not absolutely agree with the Anglo-American man of letters Logan Pearsall Smith, who said, "People say that life is the thing, but I prefer reading," I come awfully close to subscribing to his sentiment. In fact, back in the days when I did such things, I needlepointed the quotation onto a piece of canvas. I've never gotten around to framing it or turning it into a pillow. Too many books, and life, had my attention, I guess.
Quotations
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English (6)

What to read next is every book lover's greatest dilemma. Nancy Pearl comes to the rescue with this wide-ranging and fun guide to the best reading new and old. Pearl, who inspired legions of litterateurs with "What If All (name the city) Read the Same Book," has devised reading lists that cater to every mood, occasion, and personality. These annotated lists cover such topics as mother-daughter relationships, science for nonscientists, mysteries of all stripes, African-American fiction from a female point of view, must-reads for kids, books on bicycling, "chick-lit," and many more. Pearl's enthusiasm and taste shine throughout.

No library descriptions found.

Book description
Haiku summary

Quick Links

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (3.96)
0.5
1 3
1.5 1
2 25
2.5 4
3 94
3.5 34
4 180
4.5 18
5 147

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 152,674,962 books! | Top bar: Always visible