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The New Interpreter's Study Bible: New…
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The New Interpreter's Study Bible: New Revised Standard Version With the… (edition 2003)

by Walter J. Harrelson

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367147,009 (4.7)4
The New Interpreter's Study Bible brings the best of biblical scholarship to the service of the Church. In this new study Bible, based on The New Revised Standard Version of the Bible with Apocrypha, sixty distinguished scholars have provided background and insight on the biblical text. Features of this valuable new study Bible include extensive historical and theological annotations on the biblical text; brief introductions and outlines for each biblical book; excursuses giving further background and insight regarding particular themes and passages; and nineteen newly commissioned maps detailing the biblical world at various historical periods. - Publisher.… (more)
Member:AnnaRichenda
Title:The New Interpreter's Study Bible: New Revised Standard Version With the Apocrypha
Authors:Walter J. Harrelson
Info:Abingdon Press (2003), Hardcover, 2298 pages
Collections:Your library
Rating:*****
Tags:Christianity, history

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The New Interpreter's Study Bible: New Revised Standard Version With the Apocrypha by Walter J. Harrelson

  1. 10
    Holy Bible - Evangelical Heritage Version (EHV) by Wartburg Project (divinepeacelutheran)
    divinepeacelutheran: My go-to version of the Bible. No additions or deletions. Easy to read.
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The NISB stands, undoubtedly, as a landmark achievement amongst the ever-growing plethora of so-called “study Bibles.” While many of the offerings lack substance or have a bizarre focus (thinking here particularly of the “American Patriot’s Study Bible”), this study Bible provides deep engagement with the text, commitment to theological understanding, and is careful to make appropriate application. The contributors to this volume are a veritable “who’s who” of biblical scholarship. Many of the contributors have written widely-recognized commentaries on the books for which they contributed notes. Some have even written for the “New Interpreter’s Bible,” a massive multi-volume commentary edited by Leander Keck that is another landmark publication.
So far, so good; however, the NISB is written from within what is generally described as the “mainline Protestant” tradition and represents many of the commitments common to that stream. There is a deep-rooted suspicion of an overly “historical” or “literal” or “supernatural” interpretation of any text (particularly evident in the handling of the Pentateuchal narratives, the authorship of the epistles, and the Gospels’ miracles stories, including the Virgin Birth and Resurrection). Also prevalent is a consistent concern with the Bible’s “patriarchal” and “anti-Semitic” overtones. For those from my background (Oneness Pentecostal), then, this study Bible has a decidedly “liberal” slant.
Personally, I found that feature to be part of its value because it provided, in nice summary form, an overview of the mainline Protestant view of Scripture. In fact, included at the end are several articles on the authority and proper interpretation of Scripture that are very helpful in understanding this overall approach, which often appears so foreign and even offensive to Pentecostal interpretive sensibilities. Even if one disagrees (vehemently, perhaps) with any number of the claims made and conclusions reached, one still receives the benefit of seeing those propositions in context which helps those who disagree to craft more effective responses.
One thing that I appreciated was the deep commitment to illuminating the original context. I gleaned numerous insights on the ANE or Greco-Roman background of the text that wouldn’t be made available to the reader in, say, the “Life Application Study Bible.” Of course, this was often presented as a way to RESTRICT the meaning of the text, but the insights themselves were nonetheless valid.
Now, when I began this reading project about three years ago (with the now-ridiculous-sounding hope of completing my read-through in a single year), I was aware of the particular “bias.” Thus, I was pleasantly surprised to find that several notably conservative scholars had contributed at significant points (e.g., Joel Green on Luke, James R. Edwards on Romans, and Donald Hagner on Hebrews). I was further pleased to note the many places where more conservative views were acknowledged without disdain. On the whole, though decidedly “liberal,” there were a fair number of attempts at presenting an overall-balanced perspective. Enough, at least, to keep me from getting disgusted and giving up the book altogether!
There is a good bit of repetition but, of course, that is to be expected, I suppose. Study Bibles are reference works not really designed to be read “cover-to-cover”; therefore, each contributor tried to address all the relevant issues within the text rather than simply assuming they had been covered by earlier contributors. On the whole, I am glad that I took the time to work my way slowly through this book; the amount of information contained requires a slow pace. Also, I am glad that I read the work “cover-to-cover” because it gave me a sense of the mainline Protestant approach to the entire Bible…rather than just to this or that particular book.
Obviously, this is not, at least from my perspective, a “new convert’s” study Bible…one would be MUCH better served to begin with the “Apostolic Study Bible.” However, for more mature Christians, this work serves as a kind of broad introduction to the mainline Protestant way of thinking. If not ultimately convincing (at least, for me it wasn’t), it was at least enlightening. ( )
  Jared_Runck | May 24, 2019 |
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The New Interpreter’s Study Bible brings the best of biblical scholarship to the service of the Church. In this new edition based on The New Revised Standard Version of the Bible with Apocrypha, sixty distinguished scholars have provided background and insight on the biblical text. Features include extensive historical and theological annotations on the biblical text; brief introductions and outlines for each biblical book; excursuses giving further background and insight regarding particular themes and passages; and nineteen commissioned maps detailing the biblical world at various historical periods. (from Amazon.com on 04-25-2016)
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