HomeGroupsTalkZeitgeist
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Silent Spring by Rachel Carson
Loading...

Silent Spring

by Rachel Carson

Other authors: See the other authors section.

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
3,899531,317 (4.01)157
  1. 20
    Our poisoned planet: can we save it? by Joseph Newman (Hedgepeth)
  2. 10
    Deep Green Resistance: Strategy to Save the Planet by Derrick Jensen (SonoranDreamer)
    SonoranDreamer: Deep Green Resistance is a book about a strategy for those who are frustrated with the ongoing poisoning of our planet even after all this time after Silent Spring was published.
  3. 10
    The War on Bugs by Will Allen (lemontwist)
  4. 01
    Sanctuary: The Story of Naturalist Mary Majka by Deborah Carr (ShelfMonkey)
  5. 13
    Risk: The Science and Politics of Fear by Dan Gardner (Noisy)
    Noisy: Risk (Chapter 10) gives the counterpoint to Silent Spring, showing up the ignorance of probability and statistics embodied in the demonising of cancer. Rising relative rates of cancer - a disease of an aging population - also indicate a falling rate of diseases such as tuberculosis and enteritis.… (more)
  6. 13
    Breasts: A Natural and Unnatural History by Florence Williams (changsbooks)
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 157 mentions

English (51)  German (1)  Catalan (1)  All (53)
Showing 1-5 of 51 (next | show all)
Reading this book so long after it was published makes clear that we have won little in the battle against the poisoning of the world. I come away from this book realizing that we need a new strategy in order to stop the living world from being destroyed by corporations. ( )
  SonoranDreamer | Jan 19, 2017 |
As expected, the science is a bit dated since this book is now ~50 years old. However, Carson's main points are still valid and powerfully put. She helped create the environmental movement which many now take for granted. While I am pleased to know that some of the threats she described have been reversed or avoided (such as the recovery of many bird & fish species from the effects of DDT), I was still appalled by the hazards that pesticides & herbicides posed then & probably still do. I was also left with a strong feeling that the USDA and other governmental agencies of the 1940-60 period were rife with corruption -- I don't know if this was ever investigated but I sure hope that there is more oversight on these agencies now!

Carson does an amazing job of giving explanations of some basic biology as well as the plentiful descriptions of case studies. Well worth reading. ( )
1 vote leslie.98 | Jul 16, 2016 |
Sad depressing story about how we damaged our planet. ( )
  mahallett | Jan 20, 2016 |
Anniversary addition of the classic if controversial work. This includes a new introduction with a helpful brief biography of Rachel Carson and an afterword by Edward O. Wilson. ( )
  antiquary | Dec 13, 2015 |
This is a truly awesome book that had significant impact on policy in the US regarding the use of pesticides. This was well researched and well written. The points off the book are clear and accurate. The data are not to be ignored. ( )
  GlennBell | Aug 16, 2015 |
Showing 1-5 of 51 (next | show all)
no reviews | add a review

» Add other authors (25 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Carson, Rachelprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Gore, AlIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Hitchen, JonathanIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Huxley, JulianPrefacesecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Lear, LindaIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Matthiessen, PeterIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Wilson, Edward O.Afterwordsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Series (with order)
Canonical title
Original title
Information from the Italian Common Knowledge. Edit to localize it to your language.
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
The sedge is wither'd from the lake,
and no bird sings. Keats.
I am pessimistic about the human race because it is too ingenious for its own good. Our approach to nature is to beat it into submission. We would stand a better chance of survival if we accommodated ourselves to this planet and viewed it appreciatively instead of sceptically and dictatorially. E B White.
Dedication
To Albert Schweitzer who said "Man has lost the capacity to foresee and to forestall. He will end by destroying the earth.'
First words
In a letter written in January 1958, Olga Owens Huckins told me of her own bitter experience of a small world made lifeless, and so brought my attention sharply back to a problem with which I had long been concerned. (Acknowledgments)
There was once a town in the heart of America where all life seemed to be in harmony with its surroundings. (1. A Fable for Tomorrow)
Quotations
Last words
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Publisher series
Original language
Book description
Rachel Carson’s Silent Spring was first published in three serialized excerpts in the New Yorker in June of 1962. The book appeared in September of that year and the outcry that followed its publication forced the banning of DDT and spurred revolutionary changes in the laws affecting our air, land, and water. Carson’s passionate concern for the future of our planet reverberated powerfully throughout the world, and her eloquent book was instrumental in launching the environmental movement. It is without question one of the landmark books of the twentieth century.
Haiku summary

Amazon.com Amazon.com Review (ISBN 0618249060, Paperback)

Rachel Carson's Silent Spring is now 35 years old. Written over the years 1958 to 1962, it took a hard look at the effects of insecticides and pesticides on songbird populations throughout the United States, whose declining numbers yielded the silence to which her title attests. "What happens in nature is not allowed to happen in the modern, chemical-drenched world," she writes, "where spraying destroys not only the insects but also their principal enemy, the birds. When later there is a resurgence of the insect population, as almost always happens, the birds are not there to keep their numbers in check." The publication of her impeccably reported text helped change that trend by setting off a wave of environmental legislation and galvanizing the nascent ecological movement. It is justly considered a classic, and it is well worth rereading today.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 17:58:38 -0400)

(see all 6 descriptions)

First Published in 1962, Silent Spring alerted a large audience to the environmental and human dangers of indiscriminate use of pesticides, spurring revolutionary changes in the laws affecting our air, land, and water. "Silent Spring became a runaway bestseller, with international reverberations ... Even if she had not inspired a generation of activists, Carson would prevail as one of the greatest nature writers in American letters" (Peter Matthiessen, for Time's "100 Most Influential People of the Century"). This fortieth anniversary edition celebrates Rachel Carson's watershed book with new essays by the author and scientist Edward O. Wilson and the acclaimed biographer Linda Lear, who tells the story of Carson's courageous defense of her truths in the face of ruthless assault from the chemical industry in 1963, the year following the publication of Silent Spring and before her untimely death. First published by Houghton Mifflin in 1962, Silent Spring alerted a large audience to the environmental and human dangers of indiscriminate use of pesticides, spurring revolutionary changes in the laws affecting our air, land, and water. "Silent Spring became a runaway bestseller, with international reverberations . . . [It is] well crafted, fearless and succinct . . . Even if she had not inspired a generation of activists, Carson would prevail as one of the greatest nature writers in American letters" (Peter Matthiessen, for Time's 100 Most Influential People of the Century). This fortieth anniversary edition celebrates Rachel Carson's watershed book with a new introduction by the author and activist Terry Tempest Williams and a new afterword by the acclaimed Rachel Carson biographer Linda Lear, who tells the story of Carson's courageous defense of her truths in the face of ruthless assault from the chemical industry in the year following the publication of Silent Spring and before her untimely death in 1964.… (more)

» see all 12 descriptions

Quick Links

Swap Ebooks Audio
2 avail.
171 wanted
4 pay7 pay

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (4.01)
0.5 1
1 5
1.5 2
2 22
2.5 4
3 100
3.5 23
4 196
4.5 27
5 175

Audible.com

2 editions of this book were published by Audible.com.

See editions

Penguin Australia

2 editions of this book were published by Penguin Australia.

Editions: 0141184949, 0141391529

Recorded Books

An edition of this book was published by Recorded Books.

» Publisher information page

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

You are using the new servers! | About | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 113,264,357 books! | Top bar: Always visible