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The Caves of Steel (R. Daneel Olivaw, Book 1) (original 1954; edition 1991)

by Isaac Asimov

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingConversations / Mentions
4,698None1,012 (3.95)2 / 134
Member:apostlion
Title:The Caves of Steel (R. Daneel Olivaw, Book 1)
Authors:Isaac Asimov
Info:Spectra (1991), Mass Market Paperback, 288 pages
Collections:Your library
Rating:*****
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The Caves of Steel by Isaac Asimov (1954)

20th century (24) American (21) Asimov (65) audiobook (13) classic (22) crime (33) detective (43) ebook (26) Elijah Baley (18) fantasy (11) fiction (383) foundation (17) future (12) Isaac Asimov (23) mmpb (12) mystery (142) novel (66) own (26) owned (11) paperback (42) R. Daneel Olivaw (32) read (90) robot series (38) robots (304) science fiction (1,295) series (46) sf (233) sff (63) to-read (34) unread (12)
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English (61)  Italian (2)  French (1)  Slovak (1)  All languages (65)
Showing 1-5 of 61 (next | show all)
A combination of sci fi and murder mystery - what could be better? Isaac Asimov was the writer who changed my opinion about science fiction, when I was in my 30s and finally gave into the badgering of friends and family and tried the Foundation series. He has never disappointed me since.

A word of warning to those who have seen the movie I, Robot -- there is a slight similarity but this is not the plot of the movie ... For that matter, the movie isn't similar to the book "I, Robot" either! ( )
  leslie.98 | Jan 28, 2014 |
A human and a robot have been put in charge of a murder investigation. The victim is none other than the person who created the robot.In the New York city of the far future where space colonisation is 1,000s of years old already. Good old Earth's population has gone through the roof. The untold billions now live in mega cities that are walled in and covered by steel. The murder happened in space town and clues seem to point straight away to the Medievalist cults. For Lije Baley the stakes get higher by the minute. For him, everything is on the line, his wife, his kids, his job, career, and standing... ( )
  IAmAndyPieters | Nov 6, 2013 |
I found this book really interesting, not only as a seminal "robot" science fiction novel (although it is that--Asimov's first "Three Laws of Robotics" novel) but also as a pretty good murder mystery and a pretty good dystopian future fantasy. It's short and very accessible, but it's not a lightweight read by any means. ( )
  TheBentley | Oct 21, 2013 |
Addendum: I was thinking about this story this morning. Asimov has a substantial section where Bailey and R. Daneel go back and forth on the topic of the value of the individual as opposed to what might benefit the collective. I haven't read enough Asimov to know whether this might be a recurring theme. It was written in 1954 when Ayn Rand was just becoming well known. Is the connection my imagination?
---
It's fun to read some old SF. Here they are way in the future dinking around with book readers that make whirring sounds (like a MF reader), bragging about an index created especially for a list of books, a fancy slide rule to calculate problems, etc. Still, this is a nice mystery story with all sorts of typically fascinating Asimov speculations about the relationships between humans and robots and what it means to be different. Sometimes Asimov gets a little carried away with too much pontificating -- I should know since I'm a master pontificator myself -- such as when he rambles on to R. Daneel about the Sermon on the Mount and mercy and forgiveness. No subtlety whatsoever. It's a pretty good mystery, though.

Aside from Asimov's occasional preachiness, it's a good story. ( )
  ecw0647 | Sep 30, 2013 |
A millennium into the future two advancements have altered the course of human history: the colonization of the galaxy and the creation of the positronic brain. Isaac Asimov's *Robot* novels chronicle the unlikely partnership between a New York City detective and a humanoid robot who must learn to work together. Like most people left behind on an over-populated Earth, New York City police detective Elijah Baley had little love for either the arrogant Spacers or their robotic companions. But when a prominent Spacer is murdered under mysterious circumstances, Baley is ordered to the Outer Worlds to help track down the killer. The relationship between Life and his Spacer superiors, who distrusted all Earthmen, was strained from the start. Then he learned that they had assigned him a partner: R. Daneel Olivaw. Worst of all was that the "R" stood for robot--and his positronic partner was made in the image and likeness of the murder victim!

*From the Paperback edition.*

### From School Library Journal

Grade 6 UpóIsaac Asimov's mid-20th century tale artfully combines science fiction and detection. William Dufris performs it in multiple voices and with just enough camp to pull in contemporary listeners by playing to the ironies of the period in which the story was written. A human police detective, Baley, lives in New York City a thousand years hence. He's tapped to help solve a murder in a community where robots are not reviled and ends up with a partner, Daneel, who is a highly sophisticated, humanoid machine. Baley and Daneel don't have an easy time with each other or with those New Yorkers, called Medievalists, who despise robots. The action moves swiftly, yet there is time for Asimov to weave in some engaging and edifying glosses on the Bible as literature√ā¬óand for Baley to smoke, making this as an adult book of the period. While most of Dufris's voices are successful, his interpretation of Baley's 16-year-old son reduces the latter to sounding like a whiney 8-year-old. Asimov's story is a great way to introduce young readers to a polymath who captured the "American century" through futurism and literate character development.√ā¬ó*Francisca Goldsmith, Halifax Public Libraries, Canada*
Copyright √ā¬© Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

### Review

√ā¬ďWilliam Dufris breathes new life into this classic science fiction mystery.... Ultimately, he is the perfect narrator for the series, which includes three more novels.√ā¬Ē ---AudioFile ( )
  Hans.Michel | Sep 13, 2013 |
Showing 1-5 of 61 (next | show all)
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» Add other authors (28 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Isaac Asimovprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Dufris, WilliamNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Foss, ChrisCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Lije Baley had just reached his desk when he became aware of R. Sammy watching him expectantly.
Lije Baley acababa de sentarse a su mesa cuando se dio cuenta de que R. Sammy lo estaba mirando con expectación.
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0553293400, Mass Market Paperback)

A millennium into the future two advancements have altered the course of human history:  the colonization of the galaxy and the creation of the positronic brain.  Isaac Asimov's Robot novels chronicle the unlikely partnership between a New York City detective and a humanoid robot who must learn to work together.  Like most people left behind on an over-populated Earth, New York City police detective Elijah Baley had little love for either the arrogant Spacers or their robotic companions.  But when a prominent Spacer is murdered under mysterious circumstances, Baley is ordered to the Outer Worlds to help track down the killer.  The relationship between Life and his Spacer superiors, who distrusted all Earthmen, was strained from the start.  Then he learned that they had assigned him a partner:  R. Daneel Olivaw.  Worst of all was that the "R" stood for robot--and his positronic partner was made in the image and likeness of the murder victim!

(retrieved from Amazon Mon, 30 Sep 2013 13:21:13 -0400)

(see all 3 descriptions)

Fearing a violent confrontation between Earthmen and Spacers, Detective Baley and his new partner, a robot made in the image of the victim, investigate the murder of a Spacetown scientist.

(summary from another edition)

» see all 4 descriptions

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