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Tao Te Ching by Lao Tzu
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Tao Te Ching (edition 2003)

by Lao Tzu, Chichung Huang (Translator)

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10,37990274 (4.21)93
Member:thcson
Title:Tao Te Ching
Authors:Lao Tzu
Other authors:Chichung Huang (Translator)
Info:Jain Publishing Company (2003), Edition: Bilingual, Paperback, 200 pages
Collections:Your library, Classic books
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Tags:chinese philosophy

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Tao Te Ching by Lao Tzu

Buddhism (54) China (453) Chinese (215) Chinese literature (152) chinese philosophy (144) classic (71) classics (66) Eastern (54) eastern philosophy (180) eastern religion (60) Lao Tzu (214) literature (65) mysticism (45) non-fiction (446) own (48) philosophy (1,470) poetry (181) read (99) religion (1,007) sacred text (76) spiritual (47) spirituality (369) tao (274) Tao Te Ching (196) Taoism (1,344) to-read (57) translation (81) unread (54) wisdom (44) World Religions (52)
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English (85)  Portuguese (1)  Spanish (1)  Dutch (1)  Swedish (1)  All languages (89)
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Written by Laozi shortly before the Analects of Confucius this classic Chinese text has been more frequently translated than any book except the Bible. It is one of the foundations of East Asian thought that is still read today. The Tao Te Ching provides a combination of spirituality, common sense advice and a little nonsense to remind us that we live in world that cannot be known. Much of the text is open to a wide variety of interpretations. The beginning is a famous quote that provides a good example:

The Tao that can be told is not the eternal Tao.
The name that can be named is not the eternal name.

There is an important thought conveyed in those two lines that loses its' meaning if you try to reduce it to an objective fact.

On the other hand the following lines are simple good advice about how to live your life.

In dealing with others, be gentle and kind.
In speech, be true.
In ruling, be just.
In business, be competent.
In action, watch the timing.

One of the author's favorite devices is the use of contradictions to express an idea.

When the Tao is present in the universe,
The horses haul manure.
When the Tao is absent from the universe,
War horses are bred outside the city.

The Tao Te Ching is eighty-one verses and each time I read it I discover something new. For me that is the hallmark of a truly great book. The edition I have is filled with full page pictures and has the original Chinese on the opposite page from the translation. ( )
  wildbill | Dec 25, 2013 |
Not a patch on Machiavelli, yet written from the same point of view: as advice for a would-be leader. The Tao Te Ching speaks from a point of view which I find very hostile, that of providing wisdom for an aspiring leader of a hegemonistic and ambiguous state. The advice includes tips on keeping your peasants stupid and happy, and much mystical mumbo-jumbo which doesn't stand up to ten seconds' solid thinking. Mysteriously popular. ( )
  gbsallery | Dec 11, 2013 |
I've read the Tao Te Ching many times and still come away uncertain as to its meaning, but each time I get little glimmers that I didn't see before. It's probably because I'm trying to understand it that I don't. ( )
  Michael.Rimmer | Oct 19, 2013 |
Great translation! ( )
  David.Cooper | Oct 5, 2013 |
Guidance I needed. ( )
  Michael.Bradham | Sep 2, 2013 |
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» Add other authors (454 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Lao Tzuprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
English, JaneTranslatormain authorsome editionsconfirmed
Feng, Gia-FuTranslatormain authorsome editionsconfirmed
Ervast, PekkaTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Koskikallio, ToivoTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Needleman, JacobIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Nieminen, PerttiTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Ta-Kao, ChuTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Winston, WillowIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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People/Characters
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Important events
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Awards and honors
Epigraph
""The way to do is to be." (Bynner translation)
There is a road, but it does not pass through this world. - Han Shan (William S. Wilson Translation)
Dedication
Man-Ho's: To my wife, Nancy.
Martin's: For Sandra, because I love her.
Jay's: for my father, D. R-B. and the Age of the holy Spirit.

(Man-Ho Kwok, Martin Palmer, Jay Ramsay translation)
To
Leonard & Dorothy
Elmhirst
For Dave, who dances with the Tao.
(Mair translation)
To Leonard and Dorothy Elmhirst
To Vicki

"Who can find a good woman? She is precious beyond all things." - Prov. 31:10

(Mitchell translation)
First words
The tao that can be told is not the eternal Tao. (Mitchell translation)
I will begin with a comparison.
The person of superior integrity does not insist upon his integrity. (Mair translation)
Way-making (dao) that can be put into words is not really way-making, And naming (ming) that can assign fixed reference to things is not really naming. (Ames/Hall translation)
The way that can be told
Is not the constant way;
The name that can be named
Is not the constant name. (Lau translation)
Quotations
Last words
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 014044131X, Paperback)

Traditionally attributed to Lao Tzu, an older contemporary of Confucius (551-479 BC), it is now thought that the work was compiled in about the fourth century BC. An anthology of wise sayings, it offers a model by which the individual can live rather than explaining the human place in the universe. The moral code it encourages is based on modesty and self-restraint, and the rewards reaped for such a life are harmony and flow of life.

(retrieved from Amazon Mon, 30 Sep 2013 13:40:17 -0400)

(see all 10 descriptions)

A new version of the classic "Book of the Way" provides a manual on the art of living, offering eighty concise chapters that offer wisdom and advice on how to achieve balance, perspective, and serenity in every aspect of one's life.

(summary from another edition)

» see all 14 descriptions

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Audible.com

Five editions of this book were published by Audible.com.

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Penguin Australia

Four editions of this book were published by Penguin Australia.

Editions: 014044131X, 0451530403, 1585426180, 0141043687

Frances Lincoln Publishers

An edition of this book was published by Frances Lincoln Publishers.

» Publisher information page

Columbia University Press

Three editions of this book were published by Columbia University Press.

Editions: 0231105800, 9622014674, 0231118163

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