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The Bachman books : four early novels by…
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The Bachman books : four early novels (edition 1996)

by Richard Bachman

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4,111451,715 (3.85)48
Member:RadiationMan
Title:The Bachman books : four early novels
Authors:Richard Bachman
Info:New York : Plume, c1996.
Collections:Your library
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The Bachman Books by Stephen King

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Showing 1-5 of 43 (next | show all)
Ok…
Anyone checking out my book list will instantly notice that I am a Big Stephen King Fan. The stories in this collection are earlier works, written under the pseudonym, Richard Bachman and they are all fantastic. Just shy of 700 pages, it took me a while to complete it – I read slow.

Rage:
Every parent of teens could take a lesson from this story – we don’t have a clue as to what our children are thinking, going through and dealing with in their confused and hormone-driven lives. Alienation, sexual choices, fitting in, standing out or giving up – time goes on and nothing really changes. They have to learn to cope with the world as they find it and for many coping is just too much, too soon.

The Long Walk:
This story was by far, one of the scariest things I’ve ever read – because it’s a very clear depiction of the realities of war. This is what happens when our Sons and Daughters sign up to do their patriotic duty and are sent to war by some egotistical maniac. 99 young males walked themselves to death or were shot when they could walk no longer – and for what – riches, fame, glory? Every time a youngster makes the conscious (yet uninformed) decision to commit a crime, it’s just like the long walk, because they all think it will be fine. They think they will get away – and many do, but some don’t and the consequences can be quite grave. How many times have I signed up for something without a realistic idea of what that decision entailed? Too many, I suppose.

Road Work:
This is a story of a man who died when his son died. He was still walking, talking and going through the motions of life – but all zest and zeal were gone. His lack of hope culminated to the point of lunacy, which could, in reality happen to anyone who has no Higher Power as their guide and source of sustenance. The saddest aspect, was that he managed to alienate all those who genuinely cared for him, thus rendering himself alone and unable to fight the demons that plagued his psyche.

The Running Man:
Unlike the movie that ended with a genuine victory for Ben Richards, this anti-hero lost it all – E-VA-RY-FREA-KIN-THING – in his quest to save his sick child. He did well – tried like hell to overcome every challenge that faced him, but end the end, his final choice was to give up all that made him a man or to rebel against the machine – he chose to fight the power – gotta love him for it.

Now, a word for Stephen King. I realize that these are indeed earlier works, and I hope you have learned more and grown much in your years. The liberties you took with the “N” word is a sad testament to the racism in our country. And for your information – Black People do not call each-other nigger. They may say Nigga, Nucka or some variation – it’s BLACK thing and you are not Black and wouldn’t be privy to that inside information. You “F’ed” Up! ( )
  Madamxtra | Apr 10, 2018 |
I loved all the stories in this book.

"Roadwork" was really good and touched me a bit since I am experiencing the city wanting to destroy my home to make way for an unnecessary road project. Bart's total frustration with the project that bleeds over to other aspects of his life (job and marriage) tugs at the heartstrings and the ending he chose kind of feels like a pinch to the gut. ( )
  Moore31 | Feb 25, 2018 |
I loved all the stories in this book.

"Roadwork" was really good and touched me a bit since I am experiencing the city wanting to destroy my home to make way for an unnecessary road project. Bart's total frustration with the project that bleeds over to other aspects of his life (job and marriage) tugs at the heartstrings and the ending he chose kind of feels like a pinch to the gut. ( )
  Moore31 | Feb 25, 2018 |
Four early SK novellas. First up, "Rage", about a high school boy who takes a gun to school. Charlie holds a class prisoner while various adults try to negotiate with him. He unleashes his disdain on his fellow classmates and encourages them to pick on each other. It's a brutal story.
"The Long Walk" is set in a dystopian America where things are so bad citizens compete in a "long walk" in order to win a prize. If the walkers go too slow, they are gunned down. The game ends when there is one walker left. As you can imagine, it's pretty brutal.
"Roadwork" follows a man who refuses to leave his home, which has been earmarked for removal for a new highway project.
And "The Running Man", which is actually a lot like "The Long Walk". Contestants are given a head start before hunters are sent after them to kill them. The main character, Ben, is desperate to earn money for his daughter, who is ill, and agrees to go on the show. It was gritty and brutal, they all were. ( )
  bekkil1977 | Feb 10, 2018 |
Four amazing books in one collection brought to the page by a master of the written word. ( )
  Emery_Demers | Aug 8, 2016 |
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Dedication
For Susan Artz and WGT [Rage]
This is for Jim Bishop and Burt Hatlen and Ted Holmes. [The Long Walk]
In memory of Charlotte Littlefield

Proverbs 31:10-28. [Roadwork]
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Between 1977 and 1984 I published five novels under the pseudonym of Richard Bachman. [foreword: Why I Was Bachman]
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Book description
Collection of four early books written by Stephen King under the pseudonym Richard Bachman. The four novels include Rage, The Long Walk, Roadwork, and The Running Man.
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"Stephen King's novels written under his Bachman pseudonym. Includes 'The Long Walk,' 'Rage,' 'Roadwork,' and 'The Running Man.'"

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