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The Scarlet Pimpernel by Emmuska, Baroness…
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The Scarlet Pimpernel (1905)

by Emmuska, Baroness Orczy

Other authors: See the other authors section.

Series: The Scarlet Pimpernel chronological (1)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
5,263113839 (4.04)364
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» See also 364 mentions

English (108)  Swedish (2)  Hungarian (1)  French (1)  Italian (1)  All languages (113)
Showing 1-5 of 108 (next | show all)
A rousing adventure story that's by turns suspenseful, romantic and funny. Our hero fights to save folks condemned to the guillotine during the French Revolution. ( )
  dbsovereign | Jan 26, 2016 |
I read this as part of a monthly challenge in one of the groups I participate in. The parameters for the challenge being Classics, "read either a Shakespearean play or a classic love story." Amidst high school AP Lit flashbacks of the butcherings of Othello by the average drawling teen, I set out on the latter.

'Odd's Fish!' I ended up really liking this quick read more than I thought I might. It's adventurous, fun, and it all ties up nicely in the end according to the majority of the wants and whims of the time's reading set. ( )
  lemotamant898 | Jan 18, 2016 |
I read this as part of a monthly challenge in one of the groups I participate in. The parameters for the challenge being Classics, "read either a Shakespearean play or a classic love story." Amidst high school AP Lit flashbacks of the butcherings of Othello by the average drawling teen, I set out on the latter.

'Odd's Fish!' I ended up really liking this quick read more than I thought I might. It's adventurous, fun, and it all ties up nicely in the end according to the majority of the wants and whims of the time's reading set. ( )
  motavant | Jan 17, 2016 |
I was first exposed to The Scarlet Pimpernel by my ninth grade English teacher whose approach to teaching ninth grade English seems to have been getting literature down the throats of teenagers by any means necessary. More often than not, this meant showing us the movie version of novels rather than actually requiring us to read them. One spring day, we watched the 1982 version of The Scarlett Pimpernel with Anthony Andrews and Jane Seymour.

I was smitten.

Shortly thereafter, I found a used copy for sell at my local public library and for just $0.25 the world of Sir Percy Blakeney and Marguerite Blakeney was mine! I devoured it.

Twice smitten.

The Scarlet Pimpernel is a cat and mouse tale of an English nobleman who is hell-bent on saving his French counterparts from the bloody blade of the guillotine during the French Revolution. He has the annoying habit of leaving the symbol of red flower (a scarlet pimpernel, get it?) behind as a calling card and this has made everyone curious about his identity. The English have put him on a pedestal; the French have put a price on his head.

The book is filled with adventure, near-misses, secret identities, lies, espionage, shocking revelations, an arch-nemesis, and things that could/would never happen in real life, forcing you to suspend disbelief (just a tad). But that's why we read fiction, isn't it? I know there are a myriad of other reasons we read fiction, but sometimes it does come down to escapism, pure and simple.

However, despite all of the high drama, danger and excitement, there is a part of me that sees The Scarlett Pimpernel simply as a love story. Not as a simple love story; maybe, and perhaps more accurately, a love triangle along the lines of the Clark Kent-Lois Lane-Superman love triangle.

Marguerite is married to Sir Percy, but she is in love with the idea of another whose initials also are S.P. (hum...) Sir Percy seemed like a decent guy when she agreed to marry him but alas, now he seems doltish, and what's even worse, he seems quite indifferent to her. Sir Percy and Marguerite's marriage is in crisis. True, it's not as big a crisis as the French Revolution, but Baroness Orczy has skillfully juxtaposed one against the other. As the drama of the revolution plays out in the background and the world (well, France) falls apart, we can quietly explore the anatomy of a failing marriage (and possibly contemplate such questions as: How well can you really know the person closest to you? Do you only know what he/she chooses to reveal to you? Could you forgive the ultimate betrayal? Could those glasses really fool Lois Lane? Really?!)

In the end, The Scarlett Pimpernel is a sweet and tender tale that proves you can never hide your true essence from the one who loves you best.

Plus, it's about a hero. We can never have too many heroes. The Scarlet Pimpernel is one for the ages.



( )
  JosieLynn | Jan 7, 2016 |
I found this engaging at times, I liked the title character and the heroine, but the amount of waffle proved tiresome.

The Scarlet Pimpernel's identity was easy to work out, as were certain plotlines. In short, not as good as expected. ( )
1 vote PhilSyphe | Dec 19, 2015 |
Showing 1-5 of 108 (next | show all)
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» Add other authors (61 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Emmuska, Baroness Orczyprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Cosham, RalphNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Lindström, SigfridTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Mantel, HilaryIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Musterd-de Haas, ElsEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Page, MichaelNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Wildschut, MarjoleinTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Zimmermann, WalterNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Series (with order)
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
A surging, seething, murmuring crowd of beings that are human only in name, for to the eye and ear they seem naught but savage creatures, animated by vile passions and by the lust of vengeance and of hate.
Quotations
We seek him here,
we seek him there,
Those Frenchies seek him everywhere.
Is he in heaven? -
Is he in hell?
That damned, elusive Pimpernel!
Last words
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Publisher series
Original language
Information from the Danish Common Knowledge. Edit to localize it to your language.

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English

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Book description
Haiku summary
An English noble
saves French aristocracy
from the guillotine. (marcusbrutus)

Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0451527623, Mass Market Paperback)

This timeless novel of intrigue and romance is the adventure of one man's defiance in the face of authority. The rulers of the French Revolution are unable to discern the identity of the Scarlet Pimpernel, a man whose exploits are an embarrassment to the new regime. Is he an exiled French nobleman or an English lord? The only thing for certain is his calling card--the blood-red flower known as the Scarlet Pimpernel...

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:22:02 -0400)

(see all 7 descriptions)

In 1792, during the French Revolution's Reign of Terror, an English aristocrat known to be an ineffectual fop is actually a master of disguises who, with a small band of dedicated friends, undertakes dangerous missions to save members of the French nobility from the guillotine.… (more)

» see all 18 descriptions

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