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Beowulf, A Hero's Tale Retold by James…
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Beowulf, A Hero's Tale Retold

by James Rumford, James Rumford

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» See also 1 mention

Showing 1-5 of 14 (next | show all)
In high school, I read the original version of Beowulf, so I was interested in reading how the tale would appear in the form of a children's book. I recollect enjoying it much more in high school, and I think it was because we were able to go further in depth. However, I feel like this aided my comprehension when reading the shorter version because certain details were left out or glossed over. I enjoyed the illustrations that accompanied the text, and I felt that they enhanced the story in a positive way. All in all, I think Beowulf is an interesting tale, and it is truly amazing that a story has been passed down and retold for centuries. ( )
  MargaretStrahan | Nov 21, 2018 |
We read this adaptation first then we tackled the more difficult version by Ian Serrailier. Highly recommend this approach if you are not familiar with the story.
  wunderlong88 | Sep 3, 2018 |
I had to read this book in high school, the actual book, not this adaptation. And I remember a lot of other schools having to read it as well. And I remember a lot of students in my classes struggling to understand the cryptic messages that the author was portraying. I would use this as a read-aloud in a third grade classroom, there are a lot of words that are not familiar to most kids and it would be difficult to teach to a younger grade. I would also want to use this with older kids, so they are more likely to remember the story when they get to high school, and if they read the real book, then they will have some background knowledge on the story and it might now be as difficult for them to understand. Another reason I liked this book was that next to the names of characters and unfamiliar words, it had hints and how to pronounce the weird words, because even I did not know how to pronounce some of them. . For example, “He hated the Danes and their king Hrothgar [ROTH-GAR].” This helps the reader understand the names instead of skipping over them and/or taking time to try and sound them out.
  AnnaTaylor | Mar 28, 2016 |
I really enjoyed this book, because I read the full version in high school and even then I was confused by what was going on. This version of the story is much easier to understand, so I could see this being a great book to use for fifth grade to discuss theme and how characters respond to challenges. ( )
  ddeely | Mar 28, 2016 |
I love this story. Beowulf is one of my favorite stories and this is a great retelling of the heroic tale. The main idea is about the hero Beowulf and how he had overcome many beasts to protect his people until his end, which begins the legend of Beowulf. This book had fantastic illustrations! The color scheme of blue, yellow and green were kept throughout the story representing the mood of each page. When Beowulf was beginning his journey the pages were blue. During the battle, the pages were green. With each defeat the pages were a golden yellow for victory. The images were also great in capturing the time period of Beowulf. They showed the old Denmark atmosphere and warrior ways. This is a powerful detail of the story and a main reason why I enjoyed this book. Another reason I liked this book was the pronunciations next to the names of characters and unfamiliar words. For example, “He hated the Danes and their king Hrothgar [ROTH-GAR].” This helps the reader understand the names instead of skipping over them and/or taking time to try and sound them out. I would recommend this book to all ages. ( )
  kfrey4 | Apr 13, 2015 |
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Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
James Rumfordprimary authorall editionscalculated
Rumford, Jamesmain authorall editionsconfirmed
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 061875637X, Hardcover)

When sleep was at its deepest, night at its blackest, up from the mist-filled marsh came Grendel stalking . . .

Thus begins the battle between good and evil, for lying in wait and anxious to challenge the ogre Grendel is a young man, strong-willed and fire-hearted. This man is Beowulf, whose heroic dragon-slaying deeds were sung in the courts of Anglo-Saxon England more than a thousand years ago.

Award-winning author and illustrator James Rumford forges his own account of Beowulf with the few Anglo-Saxon words still present in our language. These ironstrong ancient words recall the boldness of the original poem and, together with Rumford’s pen-and-ink illustrations, they fashion an unforgettable story of a hero who never gave up—no matter how difficult the struggle—no matter how deep and dark the night.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:22:38 -0400)

A simplified and illustrated retelling of the exploits of the Anglo-Saxon warrior, Beowulf, and how he came to defeat the monster Grendel, Grendel's mother, and a dragon that threatened the kingdom.

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