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The Myth of the Lost Cause and Civil War…
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The Myth of the Lost Cause and Civil War History (2000)

by Gary W. Gallagher (Editor), Alan T. Nolan (Editor)

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3471. The Myth of the Lost Cause and Civil War History, Editors: Gary W. Gallagher and Alan T. Nolan (read 11 Aug 2001) This book has 9 interesting articles about the South's reaction to losing the Civil War, all more or less deprecating the South's canonization of the Confederacy. All of the essays are attention-holding and the book was fun to read, maybe because I agreed with the authors. Unreconstructed rebels probably would not. ( )
  Schmerguls | Nov 23, 2007 |
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Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Gallagher, Gary W.Editorprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Nolan, Alan T.Editormain authorall editionsconfirmed
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White Southerners emerged from the Civil War thoroughly beaten but largely unrepentant.
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CONTENTS:
Introduction by Gary W. Gallgher

One: The Anatomy of the Myth by Alan T. Nolan

Two: Jubal A. Early, the Lost Cause, and Civil War History: A Persistent Legacy by Gary W. Gallagher

Three:
"Is Our Love for Wade Hampton Foolishness?": South Carolina and the Lost Cause by Charles J. Holden

Four:
"These Few Gray-Haired, Battle-Scarred Veterans": Confederate Army Reunions in Georgia, 1885-95 by Keith S. Bohannon

Five:
New South Visionaries: Virginia's Last Generation of Slaveholders, the Gospel of Progress, and the Lost Cause by Peter S. Carmichael

Six:
James Longstreet and the Lost Cause by Jeffry D. Wert

Seven:
Continuous Hammering and Mere Attrition: Lost Cause Critics and the Military Reputation of Ulysses S. Grant by Brooks D. Simpson

Eight:
"Let the People See the Old Life as it Was": LaSalle Corbell Pickett and the Myth of the Lost Cause by Lesley J. Gordon

Nine:
The Immortal Confederacy: Another Look at Lost Cause Religion Lloyd A. Hunter

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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0253338220, Hardcover)

Was the Confederacy doomed from the start in its struggle against the superior might of the Union? Did its forces fight heroically against all odds for the cause of states' rights? In reality, these suggestions are an elaborate and intentional effort on the part of Southerners to rationalize the secession and the war itself. Unfortunately, skillful propagandists have been so successful in promoting this romanticized view that the Lost Cause has assumed a life of its own. Misrepresenting the war's true origins and its actual course, the myth of the Lost Cause distorts our national memory. In The Myth of the Lost Cause and Civil War History, nine historians describe and analyze the Lost Cause, identifying ways in which it falsifies history -- creating a volume that makes a significant contribution to Civil War historiography.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:20:00 -0400)

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