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How to Make Friends and Oppress People:…
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How to Make Friends and Oppress People: Classic Travel Advice for the…

by Vic Darkwood

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Written around the diary entries of several British Travelers/Adventurers around the end of the 19th century, this is a tongue-in-cheek look and the privilege that that particular class of gentlemen was able to exercise in their pursuit of sport and leisure. It contains advice on how to plan, what to pack, how to weather the local conditions, how to pick a traveling partner (never a spouse), and many tips (in condescending style) on how to maintain control over the "help". Although meant to be humorous, and obviously exagerated, it says a lot about the colonialist mindset.
  mwhel | Jul 9, 2009 |
Witty and engaging, this is a selection of priceless pearls of travel lore from travellers' and explorers' guides of the nineteenth century strung together by the inimitable prose of Mr Vic Darkwood. An excellent read, ideal for journeys in your armchair! ( )
  ManipledMutineer | Feb 23, 2007 |
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0312366922, Hardcover)

No traveler to date has matched the intrepid 19th-century gentleman for his bravery, derring-do, and ability to make a perfect cup of tea in the most malarial of climes. But the sun has set on the golden age of exploration, and the records of these fearless, mustachioed adventurers have vanished from the shelves. In their place have appeared timorous travel guides written by authors who could hardly locate Rhodesia on a classroom globe let alone comment on the proper etiquette of an Italian duel.
Now, with the publication of Vic Darkwood's How to Make Friends and Oppress People, at long last today's aspiring adventurers can avail themselves of the best of classic travel advice on such invaluable topics as:
-Using Anthills as Ovens
-Hunting Elephants and Hippos with a Javelin
-Sleeping on a Billiard Table as a Means of Avoiding Vermin
-Digging a Well with a Pointy Stick
Fully illustrated with over 150 drawings and woodcuts, this inestimable collection of wisdom drawn from actual 19th- and early 20th-century guidebooks will prove essential to any traveler looking to enjoy his excursion abroad or hoping to avoid death at the hands of inhospitable natives.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:25:13 -0400)

Vic Darkwood seeks out the advice and wisdom of an earlier generation of travel writers in order to rediscover the essence of true adventure. He looks at topics such as the avoidance of vermin, the practical theory of tea-making, catching ducks by hand, the thrill of ballooning and digging a well with a pointy stick.… (more)

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