HomeGroupsTalkZeitgeist
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

The Double Indemnity Murder: Ruth Snyder,…
Loading...

The "Double Indemnity" Murder: Ruth Snyder, Judd Gray, And New York's…

by Landis Mackellar

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
273402,159 (3)3

None.

Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 3 mentions

Showing 3 of 3
This is undoubtedly the definitive account of this famous case. The author is no Truman Capote but does a thorough workman-like job in telling of the case and the fantastic publicity which it generated in the press from the time it was committed on Mar 19, 1927, till the perpatrators were done to death on 12 Jan 1928. The book was published in 2006, so the author was able to tell what happened to everybody connected to the case. I really enjoyed the book because it told an accurate account, even though the author's comments sometimes are a bit inane. But it was an inane crime. ( )
  Schmerguls | Jul 10, 2011 |
I'm not entirely certain what was significant enough about this case to justify a book. I read the entire thing with a sort of thought bubble hanging over it that said, "Why am I reading this?" It wasn't badly written or anything. I'm just wondering why it was written at all. This isn't a particularly interesting case. If it happened now, I suspect it would hardly merit a mention in a local paper. ( )
  ajchase | May 17, 2010 |
Who knew that the Double Indemnity murder took place in Queens Village. James M. Cain and Billy Wilder took the bare bones of the story and improved it immensely. In the book we find that the wife and her underwear selling lover are inept killers stupid enough to confess. The book is mostly trial transcripts and lots of footnotes. If you grew up in Queens Village, as I did, you might find this story of interest, for all others, it's a skip. ( )
  susanamper | Aug 4, 2009 |
Showing 3 of 3
no reviews | add a review
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Series (with order)
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
Quotations
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Publisher series
Original language

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English

None

Book description
Haiku summary

Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0815608241, Paperback)

A history of the sensational New York City love triangle murder case that held the attention of the nation in 1927.

Few incidents in crime history have been as notorious—yet mundane—as the 1927 murder of Queens suburbanite Albert Snyder by his wife and her lover. Resonant of the footloose Jazz Age, it made persistent headlines and led to a sensational trial, spawning a 1920s Broadway play and the classic noir film of the 1940s: Double Indemnity. This book assesses the entire case, from grisly slaying and shabby cover-up to sharp police work and aftermath. Moreover, it explores sociocultural questions that beg to be answered: what effect does news reportage exert upon high profile cases, and why did such a transparent crime earn such an enduring place in the popular psyche?

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:06:10 -0400)

No library descriptions found.

Quick Links

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (3)
0.5
1
1.5
2 2
2.5 1
3 2
3.5 1
4 2
4.5
5

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 125,738,138 books! | Top bar: Always visible