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His Majesty's Dragon by Naomi Novik
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His Majesty's Dragon

by Naomi Novik

Other authors: See the other authors section.

Series: Temeraire (1)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingConversations / Mentions
4,913251930 (4.09)2 / 452
  1. 214
    Master and Commander by Patrick O'Brian (lorax)
    lorax: The Napoleonic Wars, just with no dragons. Better-written than Hornblower and with much stronger characterization.
  2. 91
    Mr. Midshipman Hornblower by C. S. Forester (DWWilkin)
    DWWilkin: If you like the time period, no better way to start then with the first popular series about Age of Sail
  3. 102
    Dragonflight by Anne McCaffrey (Rozax)
    Rozax: Both Novik and McCaffrey take great care in developing the worlds for their respective series. If you like one, you may very well like the other.
  4. 51
    Leviathan by Scott Westerfeld (PghDragonMan, Caramellunacy)
    Caramellunacy: Both are alternate history/fantasy novels with a distinct nautical flair. His Majesty's Dragon is set during the Napoleonic Wars - just with dragons (obviously) as a sort of Air Navy - complete with crew. Leviathan is set during an alternate WWI between the Darwinists (who have living ships & weapons) and the Clankers (who use machines).… (more)
  5. 30
    The Dragon and the George by Gordon R. Dickson (infiniteletters)
  6. 30
    Eon: Dragoneye Reborn by Alison Goodman (notemily)
    notemily: DRAGONS!
  7. 52
    Jonathan Strange & Mr. Norrell by Susanna Clarke (ErlendSkjelten)
    ErlendSkjelten: Much heavier fare than Temeraire, but all the more enjoyable for it. The Napoleonic wars, with magicians instead of dragons.
  8. 20
    Airborn by Kenneth Oppel (elbakerone)
    elbakerone: Another interesting and well written historical fantasy.
  9. 20
    Dragonhaven by Robin McKinley (infiniteletters)
  10. 10
    Opening Atlantis by Harry Turtledove (PghDragonMan)
  11. 11
    Sorcery and Cecelia or The Enchanted Chocolate Pot by Patricia C. Wrede (carlyrose)
    carlyrose: A bit lighter and for perhaps a younger audience, but also an alternate history dealing with the Napoleonic Wars.
  12. 00
    Lord of the Changing Winds by Rachel Neumeier (noneofthis)
  13. 00
    The Dragon and the Thief by Gillian Bradshaw (one-horse.library)
  14. 00
    Dragon Companion by Don Callander (infiniteletters)
  15. 00
    Midshipwizard Halcyon Blithe by James M. Ward (amysisson)
    amysisson: In this case, the dragon *is* the ship, and the main character is younger and less experienced, but otherwise they have a similar feel....
  16. 12
    The Fire Rose by Mercedes Lackey (FFortuna)
  17. 01
    A Natural History of Dragons by Marie Brennan (one-horse.library)
  18. 01
    Cast in Shadow by Michelle Sagara (leahsimone)
  19. 04
    Dragon Keeper by Robin Hobb (imager)
  20. 05
    Dragon Haven by Robin Hobb (imager)

(see all 20 recommendations)

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English (244)  Swedish (2)  Italian (1)  Finnish (1)  Dutch (1)  All languages (249)
Showing 1-5 of 244 (next | show all)
A delight start to finish. I like Temeraire very much, and his handler too. ( )
  AmphipodGirl | Oct 14, 2014 |
I've read books about dragons before. Heck, I've read about a million of them. Dealing with Dragons, Pern, Eragon, McKinley's Dragonhaven, Eona, and so many more. I thought I've read it all, that every other dragon book would be a derivative of these old dragon classics. But here, Novik makes dragons fresh again.

Laurence is a captain in the Navy with a strong sense of duty and loyalty to his lovely country. But when they discover a dragon egg, he might have to give up his life as he knows it to befriend a dragon.

Eh, who am I kidding. Duh, of course he has to give up his life as he knows it, otherwise there would be no story! But the point is, Novik writes this story well. The slow change of emotion of bitterness to gentle love and admiration from Laurence is beautiful. This is a slow-paced book. It does not tell you things explicitly or have many words to say. In fact, this is probably one of the most formal books I've read in a while, probably since Jane Austen's Sense and Sensibility. But if you stick around long enough, it's worth it to see the masks of formality drop a little and see raw emotion in small gestures.

A couple things are jarring: the strange ease in which Laurence starts to have intimate scenes with one Jane Roland and the mechanics of dragon fighting.

For the first, I am agog with disbelief. This formal, uptight prissy naval boy easily tumbling into bed? What the what? I think I need a little more convincing and more explanation about his philosophy of honor before I can buy it.

Dragon fighting in this world is quite ridiculous. Most of the time I don't really care because it's scifi and I always take it with a huge grain of a salt. But Novik tries to make it realistic. And she talks about sewing up a dragon's wound in midair, jumping onto different dragons midflight, etc. Uhhh? I don't think dragons are as similar to ships as she is trying to make them out to be....

One thing I don't understand is why dragons must be dependent on humans. And why dragons aren't more of a pest/threat. Seems to me the only thing keeping them linked with a human being is affection. Which I highly doubt could keep every single one of them attached. Meh. Improbable.

I am not terribly fond of the ending. It was less like a grand, final battle than a plot device to reveal Temeraire's powers. But I didn't hate it either.

I think I give this book a solid 4 stars, which is high praise from me. It was really beautiful. A slow development of world and characters.
Recommended for those who love a a bit of historical scifi. But anyone who has a soft spot for dragons should give this a try. ( )
  NineLarks | Sep 15, 2014 |
I've read books about dragons before. Heck, I've read about a million of them. Dealing with Dragons, Pern, Eragon, McKinley's Dragonhaven, Eona, and so many more. I thought I've read it all, that every other dragon book would be a derivative of these old dragon classics. But here, Novik makes dragons fresh again.

Laurence is a captain in the Navy with a strong sense of duty and loyalty to his lovely country. But when they discover a dragon egg, he might have to give up his life as he knows it to befriend a dragon.

Eh, who am I kidding. Duh, of course he has to give up his life as he knows it, otherwise there would be no story! But the point is, Novik writes this story well. The slow change of emotion of bitterness to gentle love and admiration from Laurence is beautiful. This is a slow-paced book. It does not tell you things explicitly or have many words to say. In fact, this is probably one of the most formal books I've read in a while, probably since Jane Austen's Sense and Sensibility. But if you stick around long enough, it's worth it to see the masks of formality drop a little and see raw emotion in small gestures.

A couple things are jarring: the strange ease in which Laurence starts to have intimate scenes with one Jane Roland and the mechanics of dragon fighting.

For the first, I am agog with disbelief. This formal, uptight prissy naval boy easily tumbling into bed? What the what? I think I need a little more convincing and more explanation about his philosophy of honor before I can buy it.

Dragon fighting in this world is quite ridiculous. Most of the time I don't really care because it's scifi and I always take it with a huge grain of a salt. But Novik tries to make it realistic. And she talks about sewing up a dragon's wound in midair, jumping onto different dragons midflight, etc. Uhhh? I don't think dragons are as similar to ships as she is trying to make them out to be....

One thing I don't understand is why dragons must be dependent on humans. And why dragons aren't more of a pest/threat. Seems to me the only thing keeping them linked with a human being is affection. Which I highly doubt could keep every single one of them attached. Meh. Improbable.

I am not terribly fond of the ending. It was less like a grand, final battle than a plot device to reveal Temeraire's powers. But I didn't hate it either.

I think I give this book a solid 4 stars, which is high praise from me. It was really beautiful. A slow development of world and characters.
Recommended for those who love a a bit of historical scifi. But anyone who has a soft spot for dragons should give this a try. ( )
  NineLarks | Sep 15, 2014 |
From the beginning you know that Laurence is a good guy with the right intentions. He is onboard as a Captain and the story begins with his ship overtaking a French one. They win and on board they discover a dragon egg locked away. Laurence takes it back to his ship and they wait until it finally hatches. The dragon chooses Laurence and he names him Temeraire. From there they go and await orders. Laurence gives up his Captain title in the Navy and his possible future with Edith to join and become the Captain in the corps with Temeraire. Together they learn how to maneuver and go to fight when necessary.

The characters are awesome to meet. You find those that are in the background and you get enough details about them to recognize and understand them. The development of Temeraire is very well written. Things don���t always come in magic and you watch as the dragon learns flying eating hunting fighting reading etc. You even see where it gets frustrated with the monotonous routine he gets into. Watching these characteristics develop and grow brings the story to life. Your heart breaks for Levitas and you want to knock the crap out of Rankin. Laurence even goes through his own struggles that you can easily follow without being weighed down by too much detail. Definitely a great read
( )
  jesssika | Sep 9, 2014 |
Super creative and well written, reads like a Patrick O'Brian novel but with dragons as part of the royal navy. It's a series but I just plan to read the first book because after you get past the concept -- which holds the first hundred or two pages -- it really is that standard naval/dragon fare. ( )
  nosajeel | Jun 21, 2014 |
Showing 1-5 of 244 (next | show all)
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» Add other authors (14 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Naomi Novikprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Harman, DominicCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Valkonen, TeroTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Vance, SimonNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Series (with order)
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
For Charles, sine qua non
First words
The deck of the French ship was slippery with blood, heaving in the choppy sea; a stroke might as easily bring down the man making it as the intended target.
Quotations
“I should rather have you than a heap of gold, even if it were very comfortable to sleep on.”
Last words
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
Initially published as His Majesty's Dragon.
The change to 'Temeraire' is the UK title.
Publisher's editors
Information from the French Common Knowledge. Edit to localize it to the English one.
Blurbers
Information from the Dutch Common Knowledge. Edit to localize it to the English one.
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Wikipedia in English (4)

Book description
Published as "His Majesty's Dragon" in the United States and "Temeraire" in the United Kingdom.
Haiku summary

Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0345481283, Mass Market Paperback)

Aerial combat brings a thrilling new dimension to the Napoleonic Wars as valiant warriors rise to Britain’s defense by taking to the skies . . . not aboard aircraft but atop the mighty backs of fighting dragons.

When HMS Reliant captures a French frigate and seizes its precious cargo, an unhatched dragon egg, fate sweeps Capt. Will Laurence from his seafaring life into an uncertain future–and an unexpected kinship with a most extraordinary creature. Thrust into the rarified world of the Aerial Corps as master of the dragon Temeraire, he will face a crash course in the daring tactics of airborne battle. For as France’s own dragon-borne forces rally to breach British soil in Bonaparte’s boldest gambit, Laurence and Temeraire must soar into their own baptism of fire.

(retrieved from Amazon Mon, 30 Sep 2013 13:41:30 -0400)

(see all 4 descriptions)

When the HMS Reliant captures a French ship and its priceless cargo, an unhatched dragon egg, Captain Will Laurence is swept into an unexpected kinship with an extraordinary creature and joins the elite Aerial Corps as a master of the dragon Temaraire, in which role he must match wits with the powerful dragon-borne forces of Napoleon Bonaparte.… (more)

» see all 11 descriptions

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Average: (4.09)
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