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The Science Fiction Hall of Fame, Volume…
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The Science Fiction Hall of Fame, Volume One: The Greatest Science Fiction… (1970)

by Robert Silverberg (Editor)

Other authors: Isaac Asimov (Contributor), Alfred Bester (Contributor), Jerome Bixby (Contributor), James Blish (Contributor), Anthony Boucher (Contributor)21 more, Ray Bradbury (Contributor), Frederic Brown (Contributor), John W. Campbell (Contributor), Arthur C. Clarke (Contributor), Lester del Rey (Contributor), Tom Godwin (Contributor), Robert A. Heinlein (Contributor), Daniel Keyes (Contributor), Damon Knight (Contributor), C.M. Kornbluth (Contributor), Fritz Leiber (Contributor), Murray Leinster (Contributor), Richard Matheson (Contributor), Judith Merril (Contributor), Lewis Padgett (Contributor), Clifford D. Simak (Contributor), Cordwainer Smith (Contributor), Theodore Sturgeon (Contributor), A.E. Van Vogt (Contributor), Stanley G. Weinbaum (Contributor), Roger Zelazny (Contributor)

Other authors: See the other authors section.

Series: The Science Fiction Hall of Fame (1)

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Classic science fiction was heavily populated with stories about exploring Mars, and A Martian Odyssey by Stanley G. Weinbaum is a fairly imaginative example of this type of story. Although science has overtaken the story - Mars' atmosphere is far thinner and colder than was believed when Weinbaum wrote the story, one can easily mentally transpose the action to a different, more hospitable planet without doing substantial violence to the tale. What makes A Martian Odyssey special is that for a story originally published in 1934, it describes a fairly imaginative cadre of alien life-forms, including one that might not even be considered to be "alive", so much as a mobile automaton. The story does have some issues though: It is told in retrospect as the protagonist recounts his adventures to his fellow explorers, which pretty much drains any real drama out of the account. Weinbaum also engages in a little bit of misdirection near then, as it turns out that a fair amount of the troubles faced by the protagonist are the result of his own perfidy, making him far less sympathetic of a figure. In the end, however, the story is saved by the diverse set of exotic aliens described.

It seems that using a narrator to recount previously occurring events was a common device used in science fiction in the 1930s, as Twilight by John W. Campbell also uses this device, but does so at an even further remove from the actual action by having the narrator tell a story that the actual protagonist told him. In Twilight, Jim Bendell tells the story of how he picked up an odd hitch-hiker who claimed to be a time traveler from a thousand years in the future who told him the story of how he had journeyed even further into the future to the twilight of man. Of the stories in this volume, this is one of the weakest, as it ends up being mostly descriptions of the empty cities and their mindless caretaker robots encountered by the time traveler. The time traveler does encounter some of the last vestiges of humanity in his travels, but as they have lost their curiosity and ambition, nothing much comes of this meeting, which more or less sums up the weakness of this story. Quite simply, not much happens. The time traveler goes five million years in the future, sees a dying world in which nothing much happens, and then comes back to tell a real estate agent about the nothing that happened. The imagined future is somewhat beautiful and somewhat depressing at the same time, but it amounts to a fairly limp story.

Helen O'Loy by Lester del Rey is ostensibly about two men who build a robot, but it really tackles the question of what it means to be human and what it means to fall in love. The titular character is the robot created by the narrator and his best friend, who are merely trying to create a responsive domestic robot that can learn how to cater to its owner's needs. Almost by accident, they create something much more - a construct that, if it isn't actually sentient, is so close as to be indistinguishable from sentience, and which falls madly in love with the narrator's friend, a development that frightens both of the android's creators. In lesser hands this story would have likely turned into a "robot gone mad" tale, but del Rey takes the next step, treating the love-struck android like a real character (albeit a fairly sexist depiction of a character by today's standards), and this is what sets Helen O'Loy apart from the run of the mill stories of its day.

Although I don't think The Roads Must Roll is Robert A. Heinlein's best work of short fiction, it is his most famous, and one of the ones that probably gives his libertarian fans fits. Heinlein was rather famously disdainful of automobiles, considering them to be wasteful and inefficient, and in this story he constructs an alternative: Moving highways that people can step onto and off of for their transportation needs. This massive infrastructure requires a massive labor force to maintain it, and unrest among this labor force is where The Roads Must Roll transforms from a description of possible technology to an actual story. The interesting thing about the way the story plays out is that Heinlein seems to condemn both labor unions and individual autonomy in favor of service to a corporate government. The workers, striking to claim a greater share of the economic wealth their services provide and also to claim overall political power, are forcibly put down by the protagonist, who extols the virtues of working for the common good - with order to be kept at gunpoint if necessary.

Microcosmic God by Theodore Sturgeon is one of the few stories in the volume in which the protagonist simply cannot be described in any way other than as a monstrous villain. Actually, there are two central characters - a scientist and a banker - and both of them are horrible people. The primary character is a scientist who figures out a lazy man's way to come up with new discoveries and ends up being one of the wealthiest men in the world. The other central character is the scientist's banker, who decides that he would like to have a greater share of the money his client's inventions bring in. Lost in the conflict between the two are the scientist's creations, forced to labor for his benefit under the pain of death should they disobey. The story builds to a climax and then ends somewhat ambiguously, although the central moral question of whether it is ethical to create and enslave life for one's own curiosity is left entirely unaddressed, which gives the story more than a little bit of an unsatisfying feel.

Of all the stories in this volume, the most famous is probably Nightfall by Isaac Asimov, which posits a planet with multiple suns that only has night come once every thousand years. I'm not sure if the physics works out entirely correctly - it seems from the description Asimov gives that night would only fall on part of the planet during the story, and not the entire planet as all of the characters state that it will. Leaving that aside, the story takes on the question of what a culture growing up in this sort of environment would be like - with natural light a constant in their lives, they appear to have never developed much in the way of artificial light sources. The planet's inhabitants seem to have also struggled to discover the theory of gravity, as the multiple suns make such calculations quite difficult. But the most important element of the culture in Nightfall is that everyone is terrified of the dark, and this terror drives the entire story forward. It should come as no surprise that the central characters are scientists, trying to pass on a better future to their descendants by applying reason to the problems they face, and their foils are a collection of religious cultists and the mob whipped up by the cultist's fiery rhetoric. As with many great works of short fiction, the ending is somewhat ambiguous, although it is at least somewhat hopeful.

Beloved by libertarian science fiction fans, The Weapon Shop by A.E. van Vogt is built around the phrase "the right to buy weapons is the right to be free". In the story, a loyal subject of the Empress is outraged to discover that a weapon shop has shown up in his town. He rages against the interloping business and raises the populace of the town against it, all to no avail, as the weapon shop is impervious and its wares are impossible to use for nefarious purposes. Despite his steadfast loyalty, our hero's life goes sideways and he ends up losing his life savings, his business, and his home before discovering that the weapon shops are merely a front for what amounts to a shadow government opposed to the tyranny of the Empress. In the end, the protagonist's life is restored to him by the influence of the weapon shops and his ability to purchase a gun for self-defense. The problem with the story is that even though it holds that the weapon shops offer freedom, they really don't. They just offer a choice of which unassailable force one can choose to align with. In the end, the story says far less that it thinks it does, and what it does say is not particularly reassuring.

Mimsy Were the Borogoves by Henry Kuttner and C.L. Moore (writing as Lewis Padgett) is one of the few stories in this volume that involved a female author. The story features the question of how an advanced culture can inadvertently, almost thoughtlessly, affect a less technologically developed one as a researcher from the far future tests his newly developed time machine by putting some of his son's discarded toys into it before sending it back to the twentieth century, and then moves on to deal with how children learn when a seven year old boy finds the box full of toys from the future. The only problem with the story is that it seems to be almost entirely set-up with very little payoff. The toys affect the two children who use them, but adults, having learned conventional logic, are unable to understand the alien logic the toys rely upon. One might expect that this would result in some sort of world changing development, but basically the kids pretty much vanish without any real impact. In a sense, the story felt like it was heading somewhere big, and ended up going somewhere small.

Huddling Place by Clifford D. Simak was later incorporated into his novel City, and details a story of how men lose their ambition. This story covers much the same thematic ground as Campbell's Twilight, but because Simak personalizes the ennui and helplessness into an identifiable character, this story is much more effective. Jerome Webster is a world-renowned surgeon who lives on his traditional family estate, where his ancestors have lived for at least three generations following mankind's mass exodus from the now-abandoned cities. But Webster has grown comfortable in middle-age, with the years of sedentary life in the familiar halls of his family home looming large in his mind. When a crisis occurs that requires that he travel to Mars to save the life of an old friend, he finds that he is unable to even contemplate leaving his cozy nest, no matter how much he wants to, and no matter how many others exhort him to. The story offers a possible glimpse into how mankind might die with a whimper, fading into small circles huddled around comforting campfires. Huddling Place is both deeply troubling and absolutely brilliant.

One of the more viscerally gripping stories in the collection, Arena by Fredric Brown posits a situation in which the fate of the entire human race depends upon the fighting skill and ingenuity of a single man. At the climax of a war between humanity an an implacable alien foe, a race of transcendent power intervenes and plucks a single human pilot and a single alien representative to fight one another in an extradimensional space, with the fate of each race at stake. The winner's race will survive. The loser's will be destroyed. The transcendent beings will move on to another universe. The story itself is framed as a puzzle solving exercise, as the hero has to figure out how to overcome the obstacles placed in his way and defeat his opponent with little more than his bare hands and ingenuity. One might note more than a slight resemblance between this story and the Star Trek episode Arena, which is not entirely accidental. Brown's story has some issues - the alien race is presented as being entirely hostile, with no possibility of peace between them and humanity, making the choice to kill them all one that entirely lacks any moral ramifications - but the struggle presented is riveting, and that raises Arena from merely average to quite good.

It should come as no surprise to anyone that the topic of Murray Leinster's story First Contact is given away by the title, as humanity comes across a ship from an alien civilization for the first time. The crew of the Llanvabon, including photographer Tommy Dort, are exploring the Crab Nebula for scientific purposes when they encounter a ship crewed by an unknown race. After communication is established, the captains of the two vessels each realize that they cannot allow the other to leave if there is any chance that their counterpart will be able to track their ship to the other's home planet. Eventually, the Dort comes up with a solution to the dilemma, and the matter is resolved peacefully. First Contact is an enduring story because it is one of the few of the era that depicts an encounter with an alien race in manner that is both hard-headed and practical, and yet optimistic at the same time. There are some elements that seem to be glossed over a bit to quickly - establishing communication between humans and a trace that uses microwave emissions to talk to one another seems like it should have required more than an off-stage hand wave, and it seems odd that two races that are as different as humans and the depicted aliens would be able to intelligibly swap dirty jokes, but these quibbles aren't enough to really pull the reader out of the story. There is a rather nasty instance of anti-Japanese racism that is inserted into the story in an off-hand manner, but this could possibly be excused by the fact that the story was written in 1945, and emotions were running high at the time. It is, however, an unfortunate black mark on an otherwise excellent story.

It seems clear that Judith Merril intended That Only a Mother to be disturbing, and it is. However, I think that what is disturbing about the story to modern eyes is not what Merril intended to be the disturbing part. The central character in the story is a woman who is at first pregnant and later a mother. The hinted background suggests that there is a war going on that has turned nuclear, and newborn babies with mutations resulting from radiation are common. Throughout most of the story the child's father is away from home, presumably due to the ongoing war, but near the end he gets leave and returns to rejoin his wife and meet his daughter. Once there he discovers the truth - his daughter is brilliant, with the mental development of a four year old before her first birthday, but limbless. At the end of the story it is strongly implied that the child's father has decided to murder his mutant daughter, and this is the truly disturbing turn. Merril clearly intended for the revelation that the daughter was a mutant to be the terrible secret that would horrify the reader and the father's solution was merely a regrettable necessity, but looking at the story now, one has to gape at the casual dismissal of the humanity of an obviously bright child on the basis of a mere physical deformity.

Scanners Live in Vain by Cordwainer Smith is an extremely quirky story that manages to cram more imaginative ideas into its relatively limited length than most novels do. Martel is a scanner, someone who has gone through the "halberman process" that disconnected his mind from all of his senses but sight so as to allow him to endure the pain of traveling in the "up and out" of outer space. Most of those who undergo the process are condemned prisoners forced into servitude, but Martel and the other "scanners" are men who volunteered for the process and are trained to fly the ships that traverse the reaches of space and oversee and care for the halbermans who serve as their crew. In the opening pages, Martel is in between voyages at home with his wife when he elects to "cranch", a process that temporarily allows him to experience human sensation again. Unfortunately, while he is in this state, he is called to an emergency meeting of the scanners, where those present debate what to do to deal with an apparent threat. As the debate continues, it becomes unclear as to whether the scanners are acting in defense of humanity and civilization, or merely in their own self-interest, and Martel's cranched status gives him a unique perspective on the issues not shared (or even understandable) by his fellow scanners. The story itself is fairly simple, and most of its length is dominated by what amounts to a committee meeting, but the world-building that underlies its straightforward narrative is what makes this a superior work of fiction.

Most people think of Ray Bradbury as a science fiction author, and he definitely is that, but I have come to regard Bradbury as first and foremost a horror or psychological thriller author, with Mars Is Heaven! being on of the prime examples supporting this belief. Ostensibly a science fiction story in which seventeen brave explorers set out for Mars resulting in sixteen arriving at their destination, Mars Is Heaven! then takes an unexpected turn as everyone meets their dearly departed relatives in a landscape that looks much like a town plucked from the American Midwest. Bradbury takes this perfectly ordinary set piece set in an entirely incongruous location and sets about building an increasing level of unease while at the same time tempering that unease with the idyllic nature of the setting. Even though the final revelation requires some rather improbable deductions from the protagonist, it is still a brilliant piece of horror fiction.

In The Little Black Bag by C.M. Kornbluth first imagined the future he would describe fully in The Marching Morons, in which the vast mass of humanity had become stupid while overseen by a handful of intellectual elites. In this story, a medical bag designed to allow a not very smart future doctor still practice medicine is accidentally sent into the past, where an alcoholic down on his luck doctor named Full finds it. Full first thinks to pawn the unexpected find for some quick cash to fuel his liquor habit, but runs into some complications along the way and eventually turns his life around and establishes a successful medical practice using the fool-proof devices from the bag. Unfortunately, he is forced into a partnership with a rather unscrupulous young woman and things go awry, eventually resulting in murder and accidental suicide. The story has a version of time travel that has some fairly interesting implications which are not built upon, but otherwise is an exploration of the effects resulting from sending a piece of advanced technology to the past. It isn't as good as Mimsy Were the Borogorves in this respect, but the quirks in the story differentiate it enough that it is still a fun read.

At just under four pages, Born of Man and Woman by Richard Matheson is the shortest work in this volume. It is also one of the creepiest. Told from the perspective of an unnamed and mostly undescribed child kept locked away by its parents, the story details its curiosity and the abuse it suffers whenever it does something that displeases its parents. Most of the transgressions committed by the protagonist involve pulling its chain from the wall and letting itself be seen by others. Matheson never actually explains what is wrong with the narrator of the story, and never gives a full description of what it looks like, although it is clear that its parents regard it as monstrous. Even so, the figure is sympathetic enough that at the end when the story appears to be about to turn, one roots for it and hopes that it will be able to turn the tables on its parents. Despite this tale's brief length, Matheson is able to construct one of the most brutally effective horror stories that I have read.

Coming Attraction by Fritz Leiber
The Quest for Saint Aquin by Anthony Boucher
Surface Tension by James Blish
The Nine Billion Names of God by Arthur C. Clarke
It's a Good Life by Jerome Bixby
The Cold Equations by Tom Godwin
Fondly Fahrenheit by Alfred Bester
The Country of the Kind by Damon Knight
Flowers for Algernon by Daniel Keyes
A Rose for Ecclesiastes by Roger Zelazny

[More forthcoming] ( )
  StormRaven | May 10, 2015 |
Most of the stories had very unsettling themes. Between that and the lack of any really good characterization work kept me from truly enjoying them as much as I might have otherwise. I think that's why I liked First Contact best -- because it wasn't depressing! ( )
  AliceAnna | Oct 22, 2014 |
Awesome collection!! Wonderful gems from classic science fiction. ( )
  hredwards | Sep 6, 2014 |
A friend of mine recently reviewed this
http://www.goodreads.com/review/show/31198022
& I realized I didn't have it on my bookshelf here & should. I have an old hardback from the library from back when I was a teen & I've read through all of these stories numerous times over the years both here & in other anthologies. Almost all of the stories are incredibly good. I won't review them all, but a few deserve mentioning.

Heinlein's "The Roads Must Roll" is probably the most dated & least favorite of mine. "A Rose for Ecclesiastes" by Roger Zelazny isn't a favorite either, although it is the story that brought my favorite author to everyone's attention.

"Surface Tension" by James Blish has always been a favorite. I think he captured the heroic spirit of exploration & striving perfectly. "The Cold Equations" by Tom Godwin is also excellent, if sad.

"It’s a Good Life" by Jerome Bixby is probably the scariest & would fit well in as horror story. It was a fantastic Twilight Zone. Little Will Robinson was perfect. "Flowers for Algernon" by Daniel Keyes is super, but sad, & the movie "Charley" was a fantastic rendition for the silver screen.


"The Little Black Bag" by C. M. Kornbluth definitely tops the chilling list, though. It's not only possible, but here. I work with folks that use computers - magic black boxes to many of them - & have seen some of the havoc wreaked through ignorance.

Anyone interested in SF should read this. I wouldn't be surprised to find out that the stories here are some of the most published. It's certainly a super collection. ( )
  jimmaclachlan | Aug 18, 2014 |
This is a great selection of science fiction stories from the past. All of them are good, but some show their age more than others, such as the first one, where 2 US astronauts land on Mars and meets the inhabitants. A few others, like Mimsey were the Borogroves, are stories I've read before.

Anyway, here is the stories by list and my thoughts on them.

A Martian Odyssey - Stanley G. Weinbaum. This is one of the stories that shows it age - written in 1934, it has two handsome American Astronauts landing on a Mars with all sorts of alien creatures. When a machine malfunctions, one of the Astronaut is lost, makes friends with an alien creature, and plunders another alien civilization. It has all the hallmarks of American Superiority, plus a laughable Mars. IT is funny and well written, but for the most part, I found it dated.

Twilight - John W. Campbell. This is a fairly standard time travel story, where a man goes to the future and sees the end of Mankind, or the evolution into something that isn't human. The story was interesting, but not very remarkable.

Helen O'Loy - Lester del Rey. This is a variation of the story "Pygmalion". Where man tries to creature a perfect woman (this time its a robot). Its cute. But again, dated.

The Roads Must Roll - Robert A. Heinlein. This is a story about power, unions, and control. In the future, the US has turned all its highways into conveyor belts that go at various speeds. It is now possible to get from one end of the country to the other in a few hours - but all this requires upkeep, specifically mechanics and technicians who keep it all going. I liked this one - Heinlein is a good author, the story does suffer from Superior Americans.

Microcosmic God - Theodore Sturgeon. This one is truly scary - a very intelligent man versed in biochemistry creates an intelligent species that works 20 times faster than humans. The biochemist keeps giving new struggles to these small engineered intelligence, and they come up with solutions, which the biochemist steals. When the US government gets involved, bad things happen. This is the first story where the US is not a good guy.

Nightfall - Isaac Asimov. A story about people on a different world, in a different solar system with different planetary alignments and rotations. In a world that is always lit by a sun, What happens when a solar eclipse happens? I liked this one - the story has a bit of history, interesting characters, and an odd planetary system.

The Weapon Shop - A. E. van Vogt. I read this story - it wasn't great, but not bad either. Basically a weapon shop opens in a city that is perfect. It confounds the residents who have never had a need to own a weapon. I found this story to be too long, and rather annoying. Probably one of the weaker ones in the bunch.

Mimsy Were the Borogoves - Lewis Padgett. This is one of my favourite short stories. And I am very happy to read it again. This story is about the flexibility of youth to learn things, to think in ways that are impossible. IF you haven't read this, I highly suggest that you find a copy. It is just that good.

Huddling Place - Clifford D. Simak. A sad story about the comforts of home and fear of the new.

Arena - Fredric Brown. Humanity at war with an alien race - a higher being intervenes by pitting one human against one "other" to see who is the strongest, the winner survives, the other species dies.

First Contact - Murray Leinster. A great story about humanity finding its first interstallar species, accidentally and how do you trust an alien being, the solution is quite ingenious. This story is also a bit funny.

That Only a Mother - Judith Merril. The only story by a woman in this collection - the world is at war, a devasting war that is using nuclear bombs - and birth defects are high. Luckily, for Maggie - her baby is all right.... I actually found this story to be annoying. The mother, Maggie, is so... Stereotypical.

Scanners Live in Vain - Cordwainer Smith. An odd, sad story about Men who give up their humanity for the good of the human race... And what happens when these people are no longer needed... I honestly didn't like this story. This was something, very unsettling about it. It is well written, but unsettling.

Mars is Heaven - Ray Bradbury. When Man invades Mars, Mars fights back unexpectedly.

The Little Black Bag - C. M. Kornbluth. A great story - in the future, the morons of the world have outbred the smart people of the world, so to keep some sort of society, The smart people (supernormals) needed to simplify things for the rest of the population. Like, the medical kit. Give it a medical problem, it spits out a solution. SO, when this medical kit goes back in time, to a doctor with a revoked license, what happens? This story is funny, chilling, and quite good.

Born of Man and Woman - Richard Matheson. This is the shortest story of the bunch. I'm not quite sure what it is about - or how it is science fiction. Its a sad tale of a prisoner kept in a basement by his Father and Mother. He gets beat by them, and eventually learns to hate. I'd like to know more of this story, such as what is the prisoner thing, or why is it chained in the basement...

Coming Attraction - Fritz Leiber. This is another dystopian type future story - maybe Feminist? I'm not quite sure what this is about.

The Quest for Saint Aquin - Anthony Boucher. A priest in a world where Christianity is persecuted, is on a quest to find a saint. With only a robot ass for a companion, his faith is questioned.

Surface Tension - James Blish. I mission to colonize a water planet goes bad - and the team must make the best of a bad situation. I like this story - it is about a strange humanity, placed in a world with diatoms, amoeba and bacteria. It is about exploring the unknown, with typical human eagerness.

The Nine Billion Names of God - Arthur C. Clarke. A strange prophesy by Monks in Tibet, a calculating computer that enacts the prophesy, and two technicians who are in the middle of it. Its an odd story of Science joined by Religion.

It's a Good Life - Jerome Bixby. This story is not exactly Science Fiction - but it is chilling. Take a small, town, USA in the 50's. Add in a small boy with incredible powers that forces the town to conform to stereotypes, and you get fear. Its a totally creepy story.

The Cold Equations - Tom Godwin. Such a sad story - A stowaway is on-board a space ship carrying important vaccines to save a colony on another planet. The space ship has just enough fuel to get to the colony, no more, no less. The stowaway is a teenage girl trying to visit her brother. The extra weight means the space ship won't arrive. Ethical Questions abound.

Fondly Fahrenheit - Alfred Bester. A crazy android, a crazy human. Chicken and Egg sort of problem.

The Country of the Kind - Damon Knight. In a perfect world, where everyone is happy and kind, how does a person who is not happy or kind survive? How is he treated by the normal?

Flowers for Algernon - Daniel Keyes. Such a sad, sad story. Is it better to be mentally retarded and not know it, or be brilliant and know how people feel about you? What happens when you reach ultimate brilliance, and than regress?

A Rose for Ecclesiastes - Roger Zelazny. The last story in this book - a world renowned, buy unliked poet is invited to Mars, a civilization that is dying. He falls in love with a Martian Girl, and saves the civilization. ( )
1 vote TheDivineOomba | Oct 27, 2013 |
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» Add other authors (3 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Silverberg, RobertEditorprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Asimov, IsaacContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Bester, AlfredContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Bixby, JeromeContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Blish, JamesContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Boucher, AnthonyContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Bradbury, RayContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Brown, FredericContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Campbell, John W.Contributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Clarke, Arthur C.Contributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
del Rey, LesterContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Godwin, TomContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Heinlein, Robert A.Contributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Keyes, DanielContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Knight, DamonContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Kornbluth, C.M.Contributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Leiber, FritzContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Leinster, MurrayContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Matheson, RichardContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Merril, JudithContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Padgett, LewisContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Simak, Clifford D.Contributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Smith, CordwainerContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Sturgeon, TheodoreContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Van Vogt, A.E.Contributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Weinbaum, Stanley G.Contributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Zelazny, RogerContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Asimov, IsaacContributorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Brown, fredericContributorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Campbell, John W.Contributorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
del Rey, LesterContributorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Heinlein, Robert A.Contributorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Leinster, MurrayContributorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Padgett, LewisContributorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Simak, Clifford D.Contributorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Sturgeon, TheodoreContributorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
van Vogt, A. E.Contributorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Weinbaum, Stanley G.Contributorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Contains 26 stories
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Book description
26 Stories:

A Martian Odyssey - Stanley G. Weinbaum
Twilight - John W. Campbell
Helen O'Loy - Lester del Rey
The Roads Must Roll - Robert A. Heinlein
Microcosmic God - Theodore Sturgeon
Nightfall - Isaac Asimov
The Weapon Shop - A. E. van Vogt
Mimsy Were the Borogoves - Lewis Padgett
Huddling Place - Clifford D. Simak
Arena - Fredric Brown
First Contact - Murray Leinster
That Only a Mother - Judith Merril
Scanners Live in Vain - Cordwainer Smith
Mars is Heaven - Ray Bradbury
The Little Black Bag - C. M. Kornbluth
Born of Man and Woman - Richard Matheson
Coming Attraction - Fritz Leiber
The Quest for Saint Aquin - Anthony Boucher
Surface Tension - James Blish
The Nine Billion Names of God - Arthur C. Clarke
It's a Good Life - Jerome Bixby
The Cold Equations - Tom Godwin
Fondly Fahrenheit - Alfred Bester
The Country of the Kind - Damon Knight
Flowers for Algernon - Daniel Keyes
A Rose for Ecclesiastes - Roger Zelazny
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Amazon.com Amazon.com Review (ISBN 0765305372, Paperback)

If you own only one anthology of classic science fiction, it should be The Science Fiction Hall of Fame: Volume One, 1929-1964. Selected by a vote of the membership of the Science Fiction Writers of America (SFWA), these 26 reprints represent the best, most important, and most influential stories and authors in the field. The contributors are a Who's Who of classic SF, with every Golden Age giant included: Isaac Asimov, Ray Bradbury, Arthur C. Clarke, John W. Campbell, Robert A. Heinlein, Fritz Leiber, Cordwainer Smith, Theodore Sturgeon, and Roger Zelazny. Other contributors are less well known outside the core SF readership. Three of the contributors are famous for one story--but what stories!--Tom Godwin's pivotal hard-SF tale, "The Cold Equations"; Jerome Bixby's "It's a Good Life" (made only more infamous by the chilling Twilight Zone adaptation); and Daniel Keyes's "Flowers for Algernon" (brought to mainstream fame by the movie adaptation, Charly).

The collection has some minor but frustrating flaws. There are no contributor biographies, which is bad enough when the author is a giant; but it's especially sad for contributors who have become unjustly obscure. Each story's original publication date is in small print at the bottom of the first page. And neither this fine print nor the copyright page identifies the magazines in which the stories first appeared.

Prefaced by editor Robert Silverberg's introduction, which describes SFWA and details the selection process, The Science Fiction Hall of Fame: Volume One, 1929-1964 is a wonderful book for the budding SF fan. Experienced SF readers should compare the table of contents to their library before making a purchase decision. Fans who contemplate giving this book to non-SF readers should bear in mind that, while several of the collected stories can measure up to classic mainstream literary stories, the less literarily-acceptable stories are weighted toward the front of the collection; adult mainstream-literature fans may not get very far into The Science Fiction Hall of Fame: Volume One, 1929-1964. --Cynthia Ward

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:13:49 -0400)

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Originally published in 1970 to honor those writers and their stories that had come before the institution of the Nebula Awards, this was the book that introduced tens of thousands of young readers to the wonders of science fiction. It contains stories by such great masters of the form as: Isaac Asimov, Alfred Bester, Jerome Bixby, James Blish, Anthony Boucher, Ray Bradbury, Fredric Brown, John W. Campbell, Arthur C. Clarke, Lester del Rey, Tom Godwin, Robert A. Heinlein, Daniel Keyes, Damon Knight, C.M. Kornbluth, Fritz Leiber, Murray Leinste, Richard Matheson, Judith Merril, Lewis Padgett, Clifford D. Simak, Cordwainer Smith, Theodore Sturgeon, A.E. van Vogt, Stanley G. Weinbaum, Roger Zelazny.… (more)

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