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King of Fish: The Thousand-Year Run of…
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King of Fish: The Thousand-Year Run of Salmon

by David R. Montgomery

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Once I began reading this book, I realized that I did not like how the illustrations included only blue, green, and yellow throughout. In addition, most of the scenes from the book were of the bottom of the ocean, but they were dull and not very creative or detailed.
The story starts with the King of the fish who has a fishhook stuck in his nose. He demands all the other fish to get it off and the Old Sea Raven keeps crying “theeyesofahare!” This part of the book foreshadowed to the hare that would enter the story as a main character later in the story. The Sea turtle then says, “Old Sea Raven means that only the eyes of a hare can cure you. I have to swim to the land to lay my eggs, and I have seen hares there.”
The turtle convinces the rabbit to come with him to the sea, by fooling him, saying, that there are “whole fields of sea lettuce sway with the waves. Sea carrots are there for picking.” Her, we see one of the main ideas of the story, deception.
Once the turtle and the hare arrived at the King’s throne, the hare claimed to the king that he “ left his sharpest eyes in a box by his bedside.” And was only wearing his “farseeing eyes to enjoy the view.” I thought this part of the book was funny because although I thought the hare had been oblivious to the trick that the turtle played on him, the hare ended up tricking the entire school of fish, the King, and the turtle. ( )
  tmalon4 | May 4, 2015 |
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0813342996, Paperback)

The salmon that symbolize the Pacific Northwest's natural splendor are now threatened with extinction across much of their ancestral range. In studying the natural and human forces that shape the rivers and mountains of that region, geologist David Montgomery has learned to see the evolution and near-extinction of the salmon as a story of changing landscapes. Montgomery shows how a succession of historical experiences -first in the United Kingdom, then in New England, and now in the Pacific Northwest -repeat a disheartening story in which overfishing and sweeping changes to rivers and seas render the world inhospitable to salmon. In King of Fish, Montgomery traces the human impacts on salmon over the last thousand years and examines the implications both for salmon recovery efforts and for the more general problem of human impacts on the natural world. What does it say for the long-term prospects of the world's many endangered species if one of the most prosperous regions of the richest country on earth cannot accommodate its icon species? All too aware of the possible bleak outcome for the salmon, King of Fishconcludes with provocative recommendations for reinventing the ways in which we make environmental decisions about land, water, and fish.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:24:31 -0400)

This book is an accounting of the natural history of the rise and fall of salmon in England, New England, and the Pacific Northwest--with recommendations for bringing the salmon back. In coming to understand the natural and human forces shaping the rivers and mountains of the Pacific Northwest, geologist David Montgomery learned to see the evolution and near-extinction of the salmon as a story of changing landscapes. An integral part of the region's rivers and seas, the salmon that symbolize the Northwest's natural splendor are now endangered, either gone or threatened with extinction across much of their ancestral range. Montgomery shows how a succession of de facto historical experiments-first in the United Kingdom, then in New England, and now in the Pacific Northwest-followed a similar story in which overfishing and sweeping changes to the landscape rendered the world inhospitable to salmon. In King of fish, Montgomery traces the human impacts on salmon over the last 1000 years and examines the implications for both salmon recovery efforts and the more general problem of human impacts on the natural world. The book concludes with recommendations for reinventing the ways in which we make environmental decisions about land, water, and fish.… (more)

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