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The Snake, the Crocodile, and the Dog by…
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The Snake, the Crocodile, and the Dog (1992)

by Elizabeth Peters

Other authors: See the other authors section.

Series: Amelia Peabody (7)

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1,639346,711 (4.03)62
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English (33)  French (1)  All languages (34)
Showing 1-5 of 33 (next | show all)
Elizabeth Peters doesn't lack in imagination. In this seventh opus in the Amelia Peabody series, she manages to slip several enemies, an amnesia, a kidnapping... There is also more room for feelings and emotions, I felt. Amelia's distress at her husband's misfortune (do of that word what you will ;) made the story more poignant than the previous books. I trust the series fans will find this book as enjoyable as the previous ones.
( )
  Sept | May 21, 2019 |
To keep Nefret's identity secret, Emerson and Peabody travel to Egypt for the season by themselves. Once there they are subject to increasing harassment until Emerson is abducted.

A very funny adventure, with Peabody's tart commentary on the action. ( )
  Robertgreaves | Jan 3, 2019 |
The usual nuttiness. ( )
  themulhern | Nov 3, 2018 |
Ms Rosenblatt's narration gives this book the 4th star. Ms Peters did, indeed, go there vis a vis the love triangle. She even returned to the overly melodramatic plot point from a couple books ago. Otherwise, it is a light, fun book. ( )
  hopeevey | May 20, 2018 |
(Originally reviewed at thelibraryladies.com.)

And we’re back for my first Amelia Peabody review of the year! After coming out on the top of my favorite reads list from 2016, I had high expectations for this book and this series. But, most comforting of all, even this far into the series, I had very few worries that I would not enjoy this book as much as I have the many that have come before it. Trust has been built, and I can now look forward to each next book in this series with very little trepidation.

“The Snake, the Crocodile, and the Dog” opens with Amelia and Evelyn pining for the adventure and romance of the past. Neither is unhappy with their life, full as each is by family and profession, but both Amelia and Evelyn spend moments reminiscing for the romantic passions they remember pre-children. And from these honest and natural feelings, comes very unwanted results, at least for Amelia. After returning to Egypt for another season, Amelia is looking forward to a rare opportunity to work alone with Emerson, as Ramses has chosen to remain in England for…school (to moon over Nefret, more likely). But these simple plans are suddenly foiled when Emerson is kidnapped and, while escaping the experience with his life, loses his memories in the process, including the fact that he was ever married to a woman named Amelia Peabody.

Generally, I am very suspicious of the whole amnesia plot tactic. This probably stems from being burned in early childhood by the egregious and completely unacceptable use of an amnesia story being thrown into my beloved “Lois and Clark: The New Adventures of Superman” and essentially triggering the beginning of the end for the series as a whole. But I won’t go on another rant about that, though it’s is difficult to resist. However, here, Peters uses it as simply another foil to Amelia’s ever-lasting quest to simply get through an archeological season without murder and mystery.

Having read the series up to this point over the last few years, it was interesting being thrown back in time, essentially, to the character that Emerson was pre-Amelia. I have to say, I’m not sure he deserved her, based on his behavior here! I haven’t re-read the original story, but I have to think that this version of the character was fairly true to how he was written then, and in one word, he’s kind of an ass. I have gotten accustomed to his gruffness and easy piques of anger always being balanced by his love and respect for Amelia. But without her influence or his desire to appease her sense of rightness, these quirks suddenly start overcoming the more appealing parts of his character. However, Amelia remains steadfast to winning him back throughout it all, even if we, the readers, want to smack him up the backside of the head (though she does employ similar tactics in her “wooing”).

The mystery itself is quite a tangled web with many villains re-appearing from past books. Probably the most challenging part of the story was trying to remember these characters and keep their histories straight in my head. There is typically a large cast of characters in these books, but we’re often meeting them for the first time and thus given time to acquaint ourselves. Here, while brief introductions are given, a lot is left to the reader to fill in gaps. I feel like the suspects would have been better rounded out had these histories and motivations been a bit better documented, for those of us who don’t have an encyclopedic memory of the series as a whole.

I also enjoyed the fact that the Nefret storyline wasn’t completely dropped in this book. Most of the previous books can be read as standalones, and that is true of this one as well, for the most part. But the adventures and outcomes of “The Last Camel Died at Noon” introduced lasting effects on the Emerson-Peabody family going forward. Not only do we have a new character whom we can only assume will be a major staple in the series in the future, but her sudden appearance and secret history would be largely commented on by society as a whole. On the more intimate character level, I loved Amelia’s struggles with adapting to being a mother figure for a daughter as well as a son, and her realization that their needs are very different. And on a larger story level, I appreciated the fact that the happenings of the previous book were paramount to the mystery we have here while still allowing the book to be read on its own. It is a tricky balance to maintain, but one that I feel Peters pulled off very effectively.

While the amnesia storyline was handled for the most part very well, this book does highlight a trend for my views on the series as a whole. I understand that perhaps the author was concerned that the happy and stable relationship between Amelia and Emerson might come across as tired, book after book, and she felt compelled to throw wrenches into the work. But the two books were this tactic was more prominently used (this story with the amnesia, and “Deeds of the Distruber” where there is much confusion and distrust between the two) were both on the lower end of my ratings. I still very much enjoyed them, but I, at least, don’t need relationship drama from this series to remain interested and when it’s present, it doesn’t add much to the series as a whole.

But, as I said, I still very much enjoyed it and am happily looking forward to the next! ( )
  thelibraryladies | Sep 15, 2017 |
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» Add other authors (2 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Elizabeth Petersprimary authorall editionscalculated
Rosenblat, BarbaraNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Epigraph
Dedication
For Olivia Grace Brown Mertz
January 18, 1992
with love from Ammie
First words
I believe I may truthfully claim that I have never been daunted by danger or drudgery.
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0446364789, Mass Market Paperback)

The delightful seventh adventure for popular heroine Amelia Peabody. The 19th-century Egyptologist and her dashing husband, Emerson, return to Amarna, where they first fell in love. When Emerson is kidnapped, Amelia must rescue her husband, find the culprit, and save her marriage.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:19:44 -0400)

(see all 3 descriptions)

As she and her husband travel down the Nile to the remote site of Armarna, Ameila Peabody is forced to disclose a dangerous secret.

» see all 8 descriptions

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