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Candide and Zadig by Voltaire
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Candide and Zadig

by Voltaire

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Strange story, but very good. ( )
1 vote benuathanasia | Sep 24, 2012 |
Book Description: Pennsylvania: The Franklin Library, 1977. 25x17cms. Limited edition as part of The Collected Stories of the World's Greatest Writers series. hc full, leather with ornate gilt decoration on spine and panels. all edges gilt with burgundy moire silk eps. 254pp Translated by Tobias Smollet with two-tone illustrations by Van Kaufmann and authors port. by Uldis Klavins. clean text despite minor spotting on pg edges. No significant edge wear. Very Good Condition
  Czrbr | Jun 7, 2010 |
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Amazon.com Amazon.com Review (ISBN 962634881X, Audio CD)

Political satire doesn't age well, but occasionally a diatribe contains enough art and universal mirth to survive long after its timeliness has passed. Candide is such a book. Penned by that Renaissance man of the Enlightenment, Voltaire, Candide is steeped in the political and philosophical controversies of the 1750s. But for the general reader, the novel's driving principle is clear enough: the idea (endemic in Voltaire's day) that we live in the best of all possible worlds, and apparent folly, misery and strife are actually harbingers of a greater good we cannot perceive, is hogwash.

Telling the tale of the good-natured but star-crossed Candide (think Mr. Magoo armed with deadly force), as he travels the world struggling to be reunited with his love, Lady Cunegonde, the novel smashes such ill-conceived optimism to splinters. Candide's tutor, Dr. Pangloss, is steadfast in his philosophical good cheer, in the face of more and more fantastic misfortune; Candide's other companions always supply good sense in the nick of time. Still, as he demolishes optimism, Voltaire pays tribute to human resilience, and in doing so gives the book a pleasant indomitability common to farce. Says one character, a princess turned one-buttocked hag by unkind Fate: "I have wanted to kill myself a hundred times, but somehow I am still in love with life. This ridiculous weakness is perhaps one of our most melancholy propensities; for is there anything more stupid than to be eager to go on carrying a burden which one would gladly throw away, to loathe one's very being and yet to hold it fast, to fondle the snake that devours us until it has eaten our hearts away?"--Michael Gerber

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:01:26 -0400)

Zadig, a good-hearted, handsome young man from Babylonia, is in love with Sémire and they are to marry. Sémire, however, has another suitor: Orcan wants her for himself. Zadig tries to defend his love from Orcan's threat, but his eye is injured in the process. Sémire abhors this injury, causing her to depart with his enemy. Shortly after, Zadig makes a full recovery and falls into the arms of another woman, Azora, with whom he is married, but who promptly betrays him.… (more)

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