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Jacob's Tree by Holly Keller
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Jacob's Tree

by Holly Keller

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A cute story about a young bear named Jacob who was not happy about being small. Jacob couldn't reach certain things his brother and sister could, he couldn't see himself in the mirror and he wasn't able to get to the top of the jungle gym because of his height and how small he was. This made Jacob upset and just wanted to be bigger like his brother and sister. Momma Bear kept telling Jacob, be patient and just wait and your time will come. Being a young bear, Jacob was very impatient and was sad to see after only a few days he still wasn't big. He ate his vegetables, took his vitamins and drank lots of milk to help him grow. One morning when Jacob woke up, he went into the bathroom to brush his teeth and he was able to see himself in the mirror! Jacob was so happy that he was finally starting to grow and was excited to start doing things with his brother and sister. A cute story to teach students about growing and that not everyone is the same shape and size as others but that doesn't make them any less of a person. ( )
  lcrosby | Apr 20, 2016 |
Jacob's Tree is a very simple and nice book about a family of bears, and their youngest son Jacob. He believes that he is too small for everything. Everything he does, he feels that his height puts him at a disadvantage and that people notice it. His parents assure him that with time, he will grow. His father shows him a way to track the progression of his height by marking it on a tree outside of his house. It is a good little book to show children that size never matters, and we all grow up in the end. ( )
  christian.mehalic | Mar 18, 2013 |
This story was about a bear named Jacob that was really small. Jacob didn't have any friends. One day Jacob's parents told him to eat a lot of vegetables, vitamins, and drink plenty of milk. After a few days had passed Jacob grew a couple of inches taller. At the end of the story Jacob was able to see himself in the mirror when he washed his face and he was tall enough to climb the jungle gym. This story teaches children to obey your parents and to try to have patience most of the time.
  JDHensley | Apr 8, 2009 |
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0688159958, Hardcover)

The bright red line on the tree outside is proof that Jacob the bear hasn't grown even one inch! Jacob's mama says wait, and so does his papa, but Jacob hates being small. Luckily, happy days, hibernation, and a little patience transform a small bear into a not-so-small bear -- with a new line on the tree to prove it -- in Holly Keller's flawless and funny tribute to preschool concerns.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:07:59 -0400)

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Jacob is the smallest bear in his family and although everyone tells him he will grow, he finds it hard to wait.

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