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How Raven Stole the Sun (Tales of the…
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How Raven Stole the Sun (Tales of the People)

by Maria Williams

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Genre- Multicultural, Legend
Age- P-I
This is such a good book; I was so excited to see it at the library, as I remembered reading the same one when I was younger. I was also delighted to see that this book was written and illustrated by American Indians! The author is Tlingit—which is where this version of the story comes from—and the illustrator is Apache and Pueblo. This book would be great in a unit about creation myths in many cultures, as it tells the story of how the sun came to be. It could also be used in a discussion about legends, as could any book in the Tales of the People series, to which this book belongs. The illustrations were engaging, and inspired by the artwork of the Tlingit people. The drawings of the sun, moon, and stars being released into the sky are especially stunning. Though some aspects of this book may be hard for a young child to understand (like the pregnancy and Raven’s transformations) it would still be very enjoyable in a classroom. The book contained several pages of factual information about the story and the tribe it’s from after the story was over, which could be an interesting follow-up to the story for students. This is a book that every classroom and library should contain, if only to make sure these old legends don’t disappear completely. ( )
  carleyroe | Mar 30, 2016 |
Summary: A long time ago, Raven was pure white, like fresh snow in winter. This was so long ago that the only light came from campfires, because a greedy chief kept the stars, moon, and sun locked up in elaborately carved boxes. Determined to free them, the shape-shifting Raven resourcefully transformed himself into the chief's baby grandson and cleverly tricked him into opening the boxes and releasing the starlight and moonlight.
Created with the Smithsonian's National Museum of the American Indian (NMAI), Tales of the People is a series of children's books celebrating Native American culture with illustrations and stories by Indian artists and writers. In addition to the tales themselves, each book also offers four pages filled with information and photographs exploring various aspects of Native culture, including a glossary of words in different Indian languages.
Personal Reaction: Striking images and I enjoy learning about different Native American folktales. A great way to enrich students understanding of Native American culture.
Classroom Extension: Use in my Montana History chapter 2 about Native American creation stories. Also can be used as an example of Native American culture. ( )
  LorraineAllen | Mar 4, 2015 |
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0789201631, Hardcover)

Created with the Smithsonian's National Museum of the American Indian (NMAI), Tales of the People is a series of children's books celebrating Native American culture with illustrations and stories by Indian artists and writers. In addition to the tales themselves, each book also offers four pages filled with information and photographs exploring various aspects of Native culture, including a glossary of words in different Indian languages. The clever Raven, who was once pure white, turns himself into a mischievous little girl as he finds a way to bring light to the world. This engaging Tlingit story is brought to life in painterly illustrations that convey a sense of the traditional life of the Northwest Coast peoples.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:23:45 -0400)

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