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Constantine's Bible by David L. Dungan
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Constantine's Bible

by David L. Dungan

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NO OF PAGES: 224 SUB CAT I: Early Church History SUB CAT II: SUB CAT III: DESCRIPTION: Most college and seminary courses on the New Testament include discussions of the process that gave shape to the New Testament. Now David Dungan re-examines the primary source for this history, the Ecclesiastical History of the fourth-century Bishop Eusebius of Caesarea, in the light of Hellenistic political thought. He reaches startling new conclusions: that we usually use the term "canon" incorrectly; that the legal imposition of a "canon" or "rule" upon scripture was a fourth- and fifth-century phenomenon enforced with the power of the Roman imperial government; that the forces shaping the New Testament canon are much earlier than the second-century crisis occasioned by Marcion, and that they are political forces.
Dungan discusses how the scripture selection process worked, book-by-book, as he examines the criteria used?and not used?to make these decisions. Finally he describes the consequences of the emperor Constantine's tremendous achievement in transforming orthodox, Catholic Christianity into imperial Christianity.NOTES: Purchased from Amazon.com. SUBTITLE: Politics and the Making of the New Testament
  BeitHallel | Feb 18, 2011 |
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Dungan has given us an excellent read. His approach is balanced and fair, and he challenges modern Christians-especially evangelicals-to think about one of the more neglected aspects of bibliology. Evangelicals have invested much intellectual energy in theories of inspiration and principles of interpretation but have done comparatively little work on the historical development of the biblical canon. I highly recommend Dungan's work as a corrective to this oversight.
added by Christa_Josh | editJournal of the Evangelical Theological Society, David E. Smith (Mar 1, 2008)
 
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0800637909, Paperback)

Most college and seminary courses on the New Testament include discussions of the process that gave shape to the New Testament. Now David Dungan re-examines the primary source for this history, the Ecclesiastical History of the fourth-century Bishop Eusebius of Caesarea, in the light of Hellenistic political thought. He reaches startling new conclusions: that we usually use the term "canon" incorrectly; that the legal imposition of a "canon" or "rule" upon scripture was a fourth- and fifth-century phenomenon enforced with the power of the Roman imperial government; that the forces shaping the New Testament canon are much earlier than the second-century crisis occasioned by Marcion, and that they are political forces. Dungan discusses how the scripture selection process worked, book-by-book, as he examines the criteria used-and not used-to make these decisions. Finally he describes the consequences of the emperor Constantine's tremendous achievement in transforming orthodox, Catholic Christianity into imperial Christianity.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:23:32 -0400)

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