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The Pig That Wants to Be Eaten: 100…
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The Pig That Wants to Be Eaten: 100 Experiments for the Armchair… (original 2005; edition 2006)

by Julian Baggini

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6961119,459 (3.48)9
Member:rastaphrog
Title:The Pig That Wants to Be Eaten: 100 Experiments for the Armchair Philosopher
Authors:Julian Baggini
Info:Plume (2006), Paperback, 336 pages
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The Pig That Wants to Be Eaten: 100 Experiments for the Armchair Philosopher by Julian Baggini (2005)

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About the author: Julian Baggini is a British philosopher, who has authored several books about philosophy for a general audience. He is co-founder of 'The Philosopher's Magazine." Baggini holds a PhD from the University College of London. Source: www.wikipedia.com. About the book: quoting from the book's back cover, "'The Pig That Wants to Be Eaten' offers one hundred philosophical puzzles that stimulate thought on a host of moral, social, and personal dilemmas. Taking examples as diverse as Plato and Descartes to Ray Bradbury and Steven Spielberg, author Julian Baggini presents abstract philosophical issues in concrete terms, suggesting possible solutions while encouraging readers to draw their own conclusions." This book is well indexed.
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  uufnn | Apr 4, 2017 |
An interesting and thought-provoking exploration of ethics. Struggling with the examples - and with why I'd choose one course of action over the other - helped me to better understand my own position. ( )
  Beholderess | Dec 17, 2013 |
It took me a bit of effort to get into this book. The first 20 puzzles weren't all that interesting. But than... I started to really think about what each story was asking - how was it the same or different than a similar scenario.

The book was easy to read, philosophy in nice bite sized pieces. The explanation at the end was also intriguing - it gave a few ways to analyse the problem, without coming to an answer.

This is a great book for simple thought experiments - I can see a number of these being used in an introductory philosophy class. Highly recommended if you want a light course in philosophy, without worrying about all the heavy language. ( )
  TheDivineOomba | May 12, 2013 |
Interesting set of scenarios. It's sometimes a bit... oversimplified, for me, although since I did philosophy in my first year of university, that's unsurprising. Sometimes it's a bit repetitive, too: I wouldn't say that there's 100 distinct problems here.

Easy enough to pick up and flick through as interests you. ( )
  shanaqui | Apr 9, 2013 |
What an interesting little book. Great for people with short attention spans like me as each chapter is only about 2-4 pages long. Basically he takes 100 philosophical arguments and presents them in a new light, then explains where he got them from and why this idea is important. Very simple to read, but you'll find yourself thinking about each subject long after the book is down. A great book to share also as it's fun to talk about each argument. ( )
  Diwanna | Aug 2, 2010 |
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0452287448, Paperback)

Both entertaining and startling, The Pig That Wants to Be Eaten offers one hundred philosophical puzzles that stimulate thought on a host of moral, social, and personal dilemmas. Taking examples from sources as diverse as Plato and Steven Spielberg, author Julian Baggini presents abstract philosophical issues in concrete terms, suggesting possible solutions while encouraging readers to draw their own conclusions:

Lively, clever, and thought-provoking, The Pig That Wants to Be Eaten is a portable feast for the mind that is sure to satisfy any intellectual appetite.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:24:16 -0400)

Collects one hundred philosophical puzzles that encourage readers to seek their own conclusions about a broad spectrum of moral, social, and personal issues.

(summary from another edition)

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