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Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl by…
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Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl (1861)

by Harriet Jacobs

Other authors: See the other authors section.

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Showing 1-5 of 51 (next | show all)
I have to say that I've never read a slave narrative quite like this one. It gave me a whole new perspective on the practice of slavery - even for those so "lucky" as to have escaped to the "free" states -- tragic. ( )
  bjoelle5 | Feb 10, 2016 |
Jacob's autobiography shows readers the horrible and devastating institute of slavery. You can feel her righteous anger, her anguish, and her powerful will through her words. She recounts her time as a slave and as a runaway - where conditions were grim (she was confined to a 9x7x3 space while in hiding for 7 years), but according to her, preferable to the alternative of being a slave.

The despicable acts of the slaveholders is coupled with the blind eye of the North (for even though they were "free" states, their lack of humanity toward blacks is evident). Jacob's descriptions of such events are heartbreaking and horrifying and her pursuit of freedom from this (for herself and her children) is admirable and inspiring. ( )
  Kristymk18 | Nov 12, 2015 |
This is a great historical document, written at the dawn of the American Civil War. Reading this narrative by someone who lived the life of slavery and could so eloquently describe her truth to us, even when read so many years later in a whole different world, is a revelation and a precious gift. The author was able to convey the evils of slavery, even as administered without the utmost brutality, giving the reader increased awareness and sensitivity. There has been much speculation on the veracity of this telling of her life and it has apparently been proven to be accurate. The only reservation I have, is that the vocabulary and writing skill seems very advanced for someone of the author's circumstance. I urge anyone who treasures freedom and is interested in the struggle for freedom for all to read this book. ( )
  jwood652 | Oct 21, 2015 |
This is a great historical document, written at the dawn of the American Civil War. Reading this narrative by someone who lived the life of slavery and could so eloquently describe her truth to us, even when read so many years later in a whole different world, is a revelation and a precious gift. The author was able to convey the evils of slavery, even as administered without the utmost brutality, giving the reader increased awareness and sensitivity. There has been much speculation on the veracity of this telling of her life and it has apparently been proven to be accurate. The only reservation I have, is that the vocabulary and writing skill seems very advanced for someone of the author's circumstance. I urge anyone who treasures freedom and is interested in the struggle for freedom for all to read this book. ( )
  jwood652 | Oct 21, 2015 |
I really enjoyed this book, it was very accessible and expected a reasonable amount of intelligence from readers. :-) Jacobs has a wry sense of humor in the face of a blatant and systemic injustice. ( )
  librarycatnip | Jan 12, 2015 |
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» Add other authors (17 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Harriet Jacobsprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Child, Harriet Annsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Child, Lydia MariaEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Jacobs, John S.Contributorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Yellin, Jean FaganEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Epigraph
Northerners know nothing at all about Slavery. They think it is perpetual bondage only. They have no conception of the depth of degradation involved in that word, Slavery; if they had, they would never cease their efforts until so horrible a system was overthrown. -A Woman of North Carolina

Rise up, ye women that are at ease! Hear my voice, ye careless daughters! Give ear unto my speech. -Isaiah xxxii.9
Dedication
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I was born a slave; but I never knew it till six years of happy childhood had passed away.
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
Originally published under the pseudonym Linda Brent.
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Book description
One of the first personal narratives written by an ex-slave, this is also one of the few written by a woman. Harriet Jacobs (1813-97) was enslaved, along with her family, in North Carolina under a ruthless master who sexually harassed her. After several failed escape attempts, and several years of hiding, she finally made her way North to freedom, where she was eventually reunited with her children. The book was published in 1861.
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This autobiographical account by a former slave is one of the few extant narratives written by a woman. Written and published in 1861, it delivers an unflinching portrayal of the brutality of slave life. Jacobs speaks frankly of her master's abuse and her eventual escape, in an inspirational account of one woman's dauntless spirit and faith.--From publisher description.… (more)

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