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Farseed (Seed Trilogy) by Pamela Sargent
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Farseed (Seed Trilogy) (2007)

by Pamela Sargent

Other authors: See the other authors section.

Series: Seed Trilogy (2)

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Won from a Goodreads giveaway

This book could have been a lot better. The change of the point of view of the two main female protagonists wasn't very fluid; some parts of the book were just rather boring, and the book shouldn't have had as much unnecessary politics in it. There was a few too many characters in the book to all keep track of, and I found myself drawn to some characters over the others, because some were more life-like and felt more real for me.

However, I did enjoy reading the book, and the plot was intriguing and kept me reading, even if it did take a while. ( )
  radioactivepotatoes | Feb 5, 2016 |
The premise: ganked from BN.com: Centuries ago, the people of Earth sent Ship into space. Deep within its core, it carried the seed of humankind . . .

More than twenty years have passed since Ship left its children, the seed of humanity, on an uninhabited, earthlike planet -- a planet they named Home. Zoheret and her companions have started settlements and had children of their own. But, as on board Ship, there was conflict, and soon after their arrival, Zoheret's old nemesis, Ho, left the original settlement to establish his own settlement far away.

When Ho's daughter, fifteen-year-old Nuy, spies three strangers headed toward their settlement, the hostility between the two groups of old shipmates begins anew and threatens to engulf the children of both settlements. Can the divided settlers face the challenges of adapting to their new environment in spite of their conflicts? And if they do, will they lose their humanity in the process?


My Rating

Take It or Leave It: If this were an adult novel, the book would have issues: the ideas aren't really that big or that new to carry the weight (which is only 287 pages) of what's mostly a non-action book, nor is the prose so engaging that you don't care. Being a YA novel, those issues are magnified, and I have trouble imagining how the target audience would be engaged by this instead of bored. The prologue does nothing for the story but remind readers that a book came before, and despite the sudden, shocking bit of violence in the very start, the book is very low key for the remainder of the pages. The most action you get is in the beginning and the climax, and the rest, well, not so much. Nuy, however, is a great little character, and I enjoyed her sections. Yet when I stopped to really consider what I was reading, I realized there was very little meat on the bones. That doesn't mean there's not any, of course: I like what Home is doing to the children of Earthseed, but not enough to continue with the trilogy/series. Let's face it: both books have been about two sides duking it out for whatever reasons, and really, the theme of conflict isn't really building on itself to make me look forward to a third book with the same basic premise. I'll borrow it if I want to read it, but I won't be buying.

That said, Sargent crafts nicely drawn heroines, and fortunately doesn't dwell much on any romantic entanglements, because what's there is the weakest part of her storytelling. And yes, this book can be read as a stand-alone, though new readers may wonder what the big deal is with some of the adults, having not read Earthseed. And it is good to see some soft SF written for the YA audience, but I wish . . . I don't know what I wish. I wanted to be enraptured, because that's what I expect of soft SF. I wanted to be enraptured, but I wasn't, and that makes me sad.

Review style: The usual: what I liked, what I didn't, with the kind of spoilers that really don't spoil anything due to the construction and nature of the book, if that makes sense. The full review is at my LJ and linked to below. As always, comments and discussion are most welcome.

REVIEW: Pamela Sargent's FARSEED

Happy Reading! ( )
  devilwrites | Feb 9, 2011 |
In this terrific and long awaited sequel to Pamela Sargent's Earthseed, Sargent presents teen readers with an exciting survival story lightly laced with science fiction elements. Characters from the less cohesive first volume appear, but the real focus is on the teenaged protagonists Leila and Nuy, children from warring factions of a Terran colony on a distant planet they've come to call "Home." These heroines are very well developed and quite strong. Although they are still nominally children in their societies, they are intelligent, bright characters who easily take on leadership roles. Although some of the sexual violence that darkened the first volume is still present, it's less of a centerpiece here, and both female protagonists spend the majority of the book happily unpaired. Their focus isn't on romance, but rather on survival--both survival as individuals and the survival of their community.The science fiction aspects of the story also take a backseat; there's some slightly troublesome hand-waving in terms of the genetic development of the colonists, but this hardly detracts from the strongly paced, action-filled plot. Sargent sets readers up for another volume, so maybe some of these unresolved elements will be addressed, but hopefully readers won't have to wait another twenty years for a resolution. ( )
  PhoebeReading | Nov 24, 2010 |
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Could Pamela Sargent’s SF Seed trilogy, comprised of Earthseed, Farseed, and Seed Seeker become the next Hunger Games? There is that possibility, as Pamela’s science fiction novels of human beings who have been “seeded” on a planet the call Home and face the difficulties of colonizing it and surviving have attracted the attention of Hollywood. The first novel in the series, Earthseed, has been optioned by Paramount Pictures and it’s set to be adapted for the screen by Melissa Rosenberg, who also adapted the Twilight films. It will be produced through Rosenberg’s company, Tall Girl Productions. The second book, Farseed, is now in paperback, and what follows is my review of this page-turning and captivating sequel.

Farseed takes place more or less where Earthseed left off. A spaceship called, simply, Ship, has seeded humans who grew up aboard it on the aforementioned planet, Home. Also seeded there are some Earth animals, like horses, wolves, dogs, lions, etc.. Ship has promised it will return some day to check up on the humans it’s seeded there, but when that day will come, if ever, is up to several potentially changing circumstances.

The humans on the planet have some amenities and modern weapons, but they are, for the most part, left to fend for themselves and to adjust and hopefully to thrive on their new planet Home.

But, there’s controversy and challenges that face the seeded humans from the very start. The humans have very different opinions about how they should proceed. One group, led by a man called Ho, feels that they should try to be more adventurous and explore their planet more, and live off of the resources of the land as much as possible. The other group, who are more cautious, and who are led by a woman named Zoheret, believes it would be better if they should just stay where they were originally deposited at least for a while, and establish a growing community, before their descendents might later spread out and occupy the rest of the planet.

Ho’s group splits off in Earthseed, and he and his family and group of followers become ever more suspicious of Zoheret’s group. They have traded with Zoheret’s group in the past for essential things, but Ho has grown increasingly suspicious of the other group of humans, and he feels that they were responsible for spreading a disease which killed some of his followers.

Ho and his family and followers, in Earthseed, had lived in caves by the sea. They are not faring nearly as well as the group they left behind, who still live in enclosed domes, though some travel on horseback and are somewhat more adventurous. A major storm that caused huge waves and flooding drove Ho and his followers from the caves, and forced them to move further inland.
In Farseed, Zoheret’s group has sent off a small band of their people on horseback with supplies to trade and/or give to Ho and his people. They still want to maintain contact with the group who split off from them, and, despite what Ho feels about them, they only have the best intentions at heart.

Nuy, Ho’s daughter, is dressed in animal skins by this time. She’s a great hunter, but she has to be, as she and her group have had to develop primitive methods like using spears to hunt their prey with. She is malnourished, though, and wants to make contact with the band that has come out and to go back with them, and maybe even take a couple of her friends with her.

Ho doesn’t like it when his daughter is seen approaching their settlement with a stranger from Zoheret’s group. He becomes enraged,and claims that Nuy has potentially brought sickness back to their group, that she has gone against his wishes, and is endangering her group. He uses his energy-based weapon on the man who comes with Nuy, and even on his own daughter, rendering them unconscious. When Nuy regains consciousness, she finds that the man who has traveled with her has been killed. Ho exiles her, which is pretty much the same as a sentence of death.

Nuy is resilient, and decides to try to find the other people who had journeyed with the man who got killed. If she locates them, she will return with them to their group and live with them, though one day she might try to contact her father again.

That is hopefully enough information about the book to give you an idea what it’s about. The main conflicts from the first novel continue, and even intensify. The author has included plenty of action and adventure, and Sargent’s world-building skills shine in this sequel to Earthseed. Farseed can be read and enjoyed as a stand-alone, though I would recommend first reading Earthseed, so you will have background information about Ship, the planet, Home, and the relatively large cast of characters in the series. Farseed is a fantastic addition to the Seed series. I’m looking forward to reading and reviewing the conclusion to the trilogy, Seed Seeker, whenever it becomes available in stores. Check this series and Farseed out today!
 

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Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Pamela Sargentprimary authorall editionscalculated
Dos Santos, DanielCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0765314274, Hardcover)

Centuries ago, the people of Earth sent Ship into space. Deep within its core, it carried the seed of humankind…
More than twenty years have passed since Ship left its children, the seed of humanity, on an uninhabited, earthlike planet--a planet they named Home. Zoheret and her companions have started settlements and had children of their own. But, as on board Ship, there was conflict, and soon after their arrival, Zoheret's old nemesis, Ho, left the original settlement to establish his own settlement far away.
When Ho's daughter, fifteen-year-old Nuy, spies three strangers headed toward their settlement, the hostility between the two groups of old shipmates begins anew and threatens to engulf the children of both settlements. Can the divided settlers face the challenges of adapting to their new environment in spite of their conflicts? And if they do, will they lose their humanity in the process?

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:21:50 -0400)

(see all 2 descriptions)

More than two decades after Ship leaves its children on an uninhabited, earthlike planet, old rivalries are reborn when an encounter between the children of Zoheret and those of her former nemesis, Ho, threaten to ignite hostilities between the two groups of former shipmates.… (more)

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