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Glaciers: Nature's Icy Caps (Earthworks) by…
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Glaciers: Nature's Icy Caps (Earthworks)

by David L. Harrison

Other authors: Cheryl Nathan (Illustrator)

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This book gives all sorts of factual information about glaciers. Glaciers are powerful they can crush boulders and change the shape of the Earth. This book goes over important vocabulary such as "calving" and explains what icebergs are. A great iceberg is what sank the Titanic long ago. GENRE: informational. USES: teach about glaciers, teach about impact of glaciers and global warming. MEDIA: digital. CRITIQUE: The illustrations capture the readers attention, and there is variety in the information given, so the reader does not get bored. Full of fun, interesting facts!
  Adrinnon | Apr 12, 2016 |
This book will let every child be astonished by the amazing world of the glaciers. It tells about the Ice Age a long time ago, how it has changed and why we will encounter another Ice Age in future. You get further interesting facts about icebergs which calved from glaciers and are now in the sea.
A very interesting book and it will probably raise the interest for the astonishing nature in our world even more. ( )
  sabrina89 | Apr 21, 2013 |
The book offers lots of information to the reader. It explains facts about glaviers which are true and reasonable. It goes far back in history and tells about the formation of glaciers and how they have changed with the time. It refers very often to the Titanic, which makes it even more interesting, as this is a very well-known fact. ( )
  bhellmay | Apr 19, 2013 |
This book explains how glaciers are made and how they melt. It is perfect for an elementary school science class. The pictures are great and it is easy to understand. ( )
  mfink1 | Nov 24, 2012 |
Review: This book is about the history of glaciers. It talks about how glaciers have formed in history. The book also explains how when glaciers start to melt and they meet the sea chunks of ice break off and are called icebergs. The book also talks about some of the largest glaciers that exist on our earth today.

Genre: Informational
Genre Critique: This informational books gives lots of facts about glaciers that are true and believable. It brings in history about glaciers and talks about how glaciers hove changed what the earth looks like today. The books also gives dates and numbers in the story that make the facts seem more real. ( )
  katherine.fuller | Oct 17, 2012 |
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Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
David L. Harrisonprimary authorall editionscalculated
Nathan, CherylIllustratorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
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An exciting look at one of the earth's most extraordinary forces of nature reveals how glaciers--enormous and destructive sheets of ice--have impacted our planet.

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