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Creeds and Quakers : what's belief got to do…
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Creeds and Quakers : what's belief got to do with it?

by Robert Griswold

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I didn't write a review when I first read it in 2005--I didn't write reviews on all I read then? Or it could have been part of my original merge of the annotated bibliography I had begun keeping.

I read it to Pat, and we had interesting discussions. She, at one point, said she was struggling with it--which I think was Griswold's point: we need to struggle with being open to the Light. It is too easy to say echo what someone else tells us is the truth! Verily, "what canst thou say?"

nb: Griswold maintains that when Fox used the term "truth," he meant "reality." I find that an interesting way of looking at truth. ( )
  kaulsu | Nov 17, 2017 |
PHP #377
  BirmFrdsMtg | Mar 14, 2017 |
This excellent pamphlet explains clearly, gracefully, and wisely the original and current Quaker witness against creeds. Please note that this does not mean that you get to believe anything you want. Griswold lays out the earliest Quakers' experience of faith as direct experience of communion with the divine Teacher, involving giving up one's own concepts, beliefs, desires, expectations, hatreds, etc., and then the ways in which creeds have crept back into Quakerism.
He explains the reasons for the witness against creeds, that include that creeds contribute to a false sense of self, and thus can lead away from the genuine direct experience of the divine. Creeds can screen us, make us blind to the spiritual reality that we experience. Creeds lead us to judge others rashly while we are blind to our own faulty thinking. Reality is something to be aware of, not to be believed. This important Quaker witness arises from a subtle but powerful awareness of spiritual reality. ( )
  QuakerReviews | Mar 2, 2015 |
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