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Kay Fanning's Alaska Story: Memoir of a…
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Kay Fanning's Alaska Story: Memoir of a Pulitzer Prize-Winning…

by Kay Fanning

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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0974501476, Paperback)

In 1965, Kay Woodruff Field, 38, a newly divorced former debutante once described as the ""Grace Kelly of Chicago,"" loaded her three children into a Buick station wagon and headed north to start a fresh life in Alaska. Little did she know that she would became the most influential woman in Alaska. Fanning took a job at the Anchorage Daily News, a struggling morning newspaper that she and her new husband, Larry Fanning, later bought. After Larrys death, Kay became editor and publisher. She pressed for settlement of Alaskas Native land claims, alienated advertisers by covering environmental issues deemed to threaten development, and in 1976 won a Pulitzer Prize for coverage of corruption in Alaskas powerful Teamsters Union. Kay Fanning died in 2000, her memoir unfinished. Katherine Field Stephen, herself a reporter, was determined to finish her mothers book. And she did, by inviting eighteen of Kays friends and colleagues to contribute personal stories about Kay Fanning.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:03:29 -0400)

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