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Wolf Willow: A History, a Story, and a Memory of the Last Plains Frontier (1962)

by Wallace Stegner

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345754,516 (3.95)20
Wallace Stegner weaves together fiction and nonfiction, history and impressions, childhood remembrance and adult reflections in this unusual portrait of his boyhood. Set in Cypress Hills in southern Saskatchewan, where Stegner's family homesteaded from 1914 to 1920, Wolf Willow brings to life both the pioneer community and the magnificent landscape that surrounds it. For more than seventy years, Penguin has been the leading publisher of classic literature in the English-speaking world. With more than 1,700 titles, Penguin Classics represents a global bookshelf of the best works throughout history and across genres and disciplines. Readers trust the series to provide authoritative texts enhanced by introductions and notes by distinguished scholars and contemporary authors, as well as up-to-date translations by award-winning translators.… (more)
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Showing 1-5 of 7 (next | show all)
"Wolf Willow" is an excellent account of Stegner's personal history homesteading in Saskatchewan and the geographical and cultural history of the Cypress Hills in the southwest of the province. Considering the popularity of creative nonfiction this is well worth a read to see the wide range of form in the genre and the liberty of blending personal essay and some fiction. The chapter "Genesis" a long fictional account of the blizzard of 1906-1907 is the weakest part of the book. Stegner is at his best when he's recounting the escapes of his childhood and unpacking the cultural mythologies of the West. ( )
  b.masonjudy | Apr 3, 2020 |
Wolf Willow by Wallace Stenger is a collection of essays along with a novella that captures the essence of the Prairies. Through his memories, research and descriptive writing he brings this small corner of Saskatchewan alive. I was fortunate enough to be travelling through this area as I read the book, and this blend of truth and fiction was a beautiful read on pioneering, environment and history.

This was the first Stenger that I have read although I have a few of his books on my TBR. He writes with strength and purpose and as a Westerner myself, I loved the pictures he painted with his words. Many people see the prairie as flat and colourless, but Stenger manages to see and describe both the layers and the colours of this unique landscape. His narrative on the particular smells of the bushes and plants had me pinching handfuls of various shrubs and grasses and experiencing these aromas for myself.

I found Wolf Willow an absorbing, informative and wonderful read. Looking at nature and history with the help of this author gave me new insight into this different landscape that appears to set a stamp on individuals who grow up in this type of habitat. ( )
  DeltaQueen50 | Sep 15, 2019 |
Part memoir, part fiction, Wolf Willow mixes Stegner's reflections on frontier communities with the history and geography of the Cypress Hills near the Montana Saskatchewan border where his family homesteaded in the early 1900s. The fictional section includes a novella and a short story that illustrate the hardships and isolation faced by the early settlers in the harsh climate of the northern prairie. It’s the perfect companion read to his near-autobiographical novel Big Rock Candy Mountain and the prize-winning Angle of Repose. ( )
  wandaly | Aug 12, 2019 |
I find this book hard to review because Stegner is one of my favorite authors. The writing, as always, is stellar, way more than a 5 rating. The subject matter was varied here as the book is partly autobiographical and partly history. The author wanted a history, which he seemed to think he didn't have, so he returned to his boyhood home in Saskatchewan, Canada, just over the US border, to a time when the area on both sides of the border was mostly wilderness and a difficult place to live.

Throughout the book, I learned more about Stegner. It's interesting what shapes people and how they become who they are later in life after being influenced by people and experiences.

The book is written in 4 distinct sections, each of which appeared to be written at different times and covering different subjects around the same area. I like the third the best and found it easier to read and more riveting. Since this is a personal work, it's hard to get excited about the history of a place I know nothing about, so the second section was slow going for me. Still, I learned. The first and fourth sections were good but not as much as the third. The book would be fascinating for someone interested in the history of this area in both the US and Canada when it was still a frontier.

I suspect the book was satisfying to Stegner -- he got his history and seemed to enjoy the search and memories. The 4 rating is for content -- not that it isn't good for the right person, but it didn't hold my interest well in some sections. So unusual for a book by this author. Otherwise, the ratings aren't high enough for this author's writing.

( )
  Rascalstar | Jan 21, 2017 |
What an amazing book. The region itself is the main character. The writing is mixed between Stegner's autobiographical musings, plain history, and a novella about on characters' experience. Stegner is at once mesmerized and loving about the country, while also deploring the complete waste and human failure that occurred when an essentially unlivable land was settled. I can't say it is uplifting, but it is beautiful! ( )
  tkraft | May 2, 2011 |
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Wallace Stegner weaves together fiction and nonfiction, history and impressions, childhood remembrance and adult reflections in this unusual portrait of his boyhood. Set in Cypress Hills in southern Saskatchewan, where Stegner's family homesteaded from 1914 to 1920, Wolf Willow brings to life both the pioneer community and the magnificent landscape that surrounds it. For more than seventy years, Penguin has been the leading publisher of classic literature in the English-speaking world. With more than 1,700 titles, Penguin Classics represents a global bookshelf of the best works throughout history and across genres and disciplines. Readers trust the series to provide authoritative texts enhanced by introductions and notes by distinguished scholars and contemporary authors, as well as up-to-date translations by award-winning translators.

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