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Inferno: A New Translation by Dante…
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Inferno: A New Translation (edition 2012)

by Dante Alighieri, Henrik Drescher (Illustrator), Mary Jo Bang (Translator)

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15,103143127 (4.1)1 / 394
Member:Mz.Balma
Title:Inferno: A New Translation
Authors:Dante Alighieri
Other authors:Henrik Drescher (Illustrator), Mary Jo Bang (Translator)
Info:Graywolf Press (2012), Edition: Illustrated, Hardcover, 352 pages
Collections:Your library
Rating:***
Tags:Poetry, Verse Novels/Epic Poetry

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The Inferno by Dante Alighieri

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English (138)  Italian (1)  Swedish (1)  Dutch (1)  German (1)  French (1)  All languages (143)
Showing 1-5 of 138 (next | show all)
I read the Longfellow translation and despite a huge lack of historical knowledge about Dante's contemporary Florence I really enjoyed Inferno.

The imaginative punishments are gruesome enough to capture your attention and the whole poem is successful in painting quite a visual image of Dante's incarnation of hell.

( )
  Laurochka | Feb 6, 2016 |
This was the most difficult book to understand i have ever read do to so many old local events and characters in it. It was hell but I am glad i got through it. it felt like an acomplishment ( )
  Bruce_Deming | Feb 5, 2016 |
I like this series better than her adult series. There is less mating drama, and Ash and the other Hunter's are so much more interesting when he's dealing with these young ones. I loved it, it was fun, adventurous, touching and frustrating.
Nick is still struggling with his powers and the realization that he may be the end of all he loves. He is changing, faster than expected. His trust is broken between him and his girl. His knowledge of what her job is hurts him too deeply to ignore.
When a hot cheerleader come onto him his teenage hormones drag him to her body where he finds it really nice. Yeh, except everything is not what it seems, is it ever ? His father is weakening, forces are after him, his hormones are wild, his controls are slipping and he finally gets to drive. He's already on the edge, then his mother goes missing. Can you say ballistic ? Things are a changing, and Nick and friends scramble to keep up. ( )
  TheYodamom | Jan 29, 2016 |
On my trip to Italy I was able to re-read Dante's Inferno. I was struck by how he cleverly inserts his enemies and contemporary villains into the epic. Also, I cannot help but wonder if the ingenious torments he comes up for each sin are original with Dante. Of course, I love it that Dante doesn't hesitate to place Popes in various circles of Hell. The way he and Virgil have to dodge demons makes the trip an exciting adventure. I must admit I fully enjoyed this version by Charles Eliot Norton with the explanatory notes. I did want to add ...Fierce rivalries often split the dominant faction. So in 1302 the “Black” Guelfs, in alliance with Pope Boniface VIII, succeeded in expelling the “Whites.” Among the White Guelfs at this time was Dante (1265–1321), who had held public office. Doomed to spend the rest of his life in exile, he wrote the Divine Comedy while in exile. So, Dante puts Popes Nicholas, Boniface and Clement in the 8th and 9th circles of hell for fraud. Boniface is Dante's number one foe. ( )
  jerry-book | Jan 26, 2016 |
Absolutely fantastic... there is a good reason why it's in the classics! ( )
  Lisaandrea12 | Jan 24, 2016 |
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» Add other authors (96 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Alighieri, Danteprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Sayers, Dorothy L.Translatormain authorsome editionsconfirmed
Kirkpatrick, RobinEditor & Translatorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Bego, HarrieRegistersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Blake, WilliamIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Boeken, H.J.Translatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Bosco, UmbertoEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Botticelli, SandroIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Bremer, FredericaTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Brouwer, RobTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Carson, CiaranTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Cary, Henry FrancisTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Chiavacci Leonardi, A. M.Editorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Ciardi, JohnTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Doré, GustaveIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Doré, GustaveIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Eikeboom, Rogiersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Ellis, SteveTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Freccero, JohnForewordsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Halpern, DanielEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Hollander, JeanTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Hollander, RobertTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Janssen, JacquesTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Kuenen, WilhelminaIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Longfellow, Henry WadsworthTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
MacAllister, Archibald T.Introductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Mandelbaum, AllenTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Mazur, MichaelIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Moser, BarryIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Musa, MarkTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Norton, Charles EliotTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Phillips, Tomsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Pinsky, RobertTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Pipping, AlineTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Reggio, GiovanniEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Rooy, Ronald deIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Rutgers, JacoBeeldredactiesecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Scott-Giles, C. W.Mapssecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Sibbald, James RomanesTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Sinclair, John D.Translatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Singleton, Charles S.Translatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Singleton, Charles S.Translatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Tiggelen, Chrisjan vanIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Williams, HeathcoteNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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First words
When I had journeyed half of our life's way, I found myself within a shadowed forest, for I had lost the path that does not stray. (Nel mezzo del cammin di nostra vita mi ritrovai per una selva oscura, che la diritta via era smarrita.)
Midway in his allotted threescore years and ten, Dante comes to himself with a start and realizes that he has strayed from the True Way into the Dark Wood of Error (Worldliness).
Quotations
Abandon all hope, ye who enter here.
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0451527984, Mass Market Paperback)

Considered to be one of the greatest literary works of all time- equal only to those of Shakespeare-Dante's immortal drama of a journey through Hell is the first volume of his Divine Comedy. The remaining canticles, The Purgatorio and The Paradiso, will be published this summer in quick succession.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:14:27 -0400)

(see all 8 descriptions)

In the first part of Dante's epic poem about the three realms of the Christian afterlife, a spiritual pilgrim is led by Virgil through the nine circles of Hell.

(summary from another edition)

» see all 22 descriptions

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