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Happy, Happy Chinese New Year! by DEMI DEMI
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Happy, Happy Chinese New Year!

by DEMI DEMI

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This story portrays the facts and traditions for the Chinese New Year. There are cultural relevant pictures with many culture examples. From sweeping the house to lion dances, the Chinese New Year is quite a celebration. The pictures are great support for the culture and theme is catching. ( )
  Katieflu628 | Nov 21, 2013 |
The Chinese New year is celebrated in the Spring for new planting and fresh beginnings. Chinese New Year customs include sweeping and dusting, paying off debts, cooking traditional foods that have meanings, popping fireworks and receiving gifts, and there are lion dances. It is an informational book on the Chinese celebration that could be used to show the differences between the American New Year and the Chinese New Year. It could be used around the New Year or it could be used with an American New Year book when teaching a lesson on comparing and contrasting. ( )
  ahernandez91 | Sep 21, 2011 |
This informative book tells about the Chinese New Year customs. Cleaning, cooking, recieving haircuts, lighting fireworks, and recieving gifts are all part of a happy new year in China. ( )
  ebruno | Jul 12, 2011 |
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  iguanagarden | Feb 12, 2009 |
Amazon.com
Kung-Hsi Fa-Ts’Ai! Happy New Year! The Chinese New Year is all about fresh starts. Taking place during China’s springtime (usually January or February in the Western calendar), celebrations include sweeping and dusting, paying off debts, catching up on homework, cooking and eating, setting off firecrackers, and dancing. Acclaimed author/illustrator Demi’s delightful little ode to the Chinese New Year describes in intriguing detail each of these festivities and more. Accompanying the text are Demi’s intricate and vibrant illustrations featuring Chinese children and adults participating exuberantly in each event--even mopping floors and washing hair seem like joyful occasions! We learn about the symbols behind traditional foods: "Pork brings wealth," "Sweet-and-sour fish signifies surplus," "Fried rice symbolizes harmony and plenty." And we marvel at the gorgeous dragons, lions, kites, and door guardians that dance, fly, and stand guard throughout the days of the New Year.
Demi’s interest in Eastern traditional celebrations and lore are reflected in many of her other works for children: Buddha, Liang and the Magic Paintbrush, and another Chinese New Year title, Happy New Year/Kung-Hsi Fa-Ts'ai!. (Ages 5 to 8) --Emilie Coulter ( )
  ciro1012 | Aug 8, 2007 |
Showing 5 of 5
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Amazon.com Amazon.com Review (ISBN 0375826424, Hardcover)

Kung-Hsi Fa-Ts’Ai! Happy New Year! The Chinese New Year is all about fresh starts. Taking place during China’s springtime (usually January or February in the Western calendar), celebrations include sweeping and dusting, paying off debts, catching up on homework, cooking and eating, setting off firecrackers, and dancing. Acclaimed author/illustrator Demi’s delightful little ode to the Chinese New Year describes in intriguing detail each of these festivities and more. Accompanying the text are Demi’s intricate and vibrant illustrations featuring Chinese children and adults participating exuberantly in each event--even mopping floors and washing hair seem like joyful occasions! We learn about the symbols behind traditional foods: "Pork brings wealth," "Sweet-and-sour fish signifies surplus," "Fried rice symbolizes harmony and plenty." And we marvel at the gorgeous dragons, lions, kites, and door guardians that dance, fly, and stand guard throughout the days of the New Year.

Demi’s interest in Eastern traditional celebrations and lore are reflected in many of her other works for children: Buddha, Liang and the Magic Paintbrush, and another Chinese New Year title, Happy New Year/Kung-Hsi Fa-Ts'ai!. (Ages 5 to 8) --Emilie Coulter

(retrieved from Amazon Mon, 30 Sep 2013 14:00:01 -0400)

Examines the customs, traditions, food, and lore associated with the celebration of Chinese New Year.

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