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Killing Time by Caleb Carr
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Killing Time (edition 2002)

by Caleb Carr

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1,1052310,735 (2.74)20
Member:Whisper1
Title:Killing Time
Authors:Caleb Carr
Info:Grand Central Publishing (2002), Mass Market Paperback, 352 pages
Collections:Your library, To read
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Tags:TBR, ADDED 4/21/11

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Killing Time by Caleb Carr

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Showing 1-5 of 23 (next | show all)
I am still in love with Malcolm Tressalian. I bought this book again when I lost my beloved large print edition in a move. It was worth it. ( )
  LaRiccia | Mar 25, 2017 |
written in a (u/dys)topian literary style, which includes a typical banging of the ideologue drum. surprisingly perceptive, given that it was published in 2000, is talking about many of the things we deal with today - misinformation and dissemination of the "official story", privacy, corporate influences in politics, genetic engineering, pollution & climate change, water scarcity, even unmanned/ drone warfare. reads surprisingly quickly. nowhere near as shallow as reviews would have you believe. far from perfect, yet worth the read. full review coming later. deeply flawed in the way most literary dystopias are in that the tour of the conceived world takes precedence over plot. ( )
  lyrrael | Oct 18, 2015 |
This is the first Carr novel that has been set in the future--the previous books I've read by him were all set in the past, and Carr worked hard to ensure the voice matched the period. So this book was obviously different.

Another key difference is not writing in the historical fiction genre bit rather the dystopia genre instead. After recently reading Space Merchants, I was very aware of some of the similarities of the two books (since both have themes I am interested in, it worked out for me). I was also keenly interested in a future world where the US was at war with Afghanistan... Especially when the book was written in 1999-was the possibility of our going to war so obvious even then?

Definitely a good read. Plus it has super awesome technology, fights, and even love. ( )
  csweder | Jul 8, 2014 |
This is the first Carr novel that has been set in the future--the previous books I've read by him were all set in the past, and Carr worked hard to ensure the voice matched the period. So this book was obviously different.

Another key difference is not writing in the historical fiction genre bit rather the dystopia genre instead. After recently reading Space Merchants, I was very aware of some of the similarities of the two books (since both have themes I am interested in, it worked out for me). I was also keenly interested in a future world where the US was at war with Afghanistan... Especially when the book was written in 1999-was the possibility of our going to war so obvious even then?

Definitely a good read. Plus it has super awesome technology, fights, and even love. ( )
  csweder | Jul 8, 2014 |
Horrible, horrible book! ( )
  catherar | May 5, 2011 |
Showing 1-5 of 23 (next | show all)
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Epigraph
I have but one lamp by which my feet are guided, and
that is the lamp of experience. I know no way of
judging the future but by the past.
—PATRICK HENRY, 1775
Dedication
This book is dedicated to
SUZANNE GLUCK
Anyone who has a problem would do well to
take it up with her.
First words
We leave at daylight, so I must write quickly.
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
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Amazon.com Amazon.com Review (ISBN 044661095X, Mass Market Paperback)

It's 2023, and the Web has almost destroyed the world. While cyberspace's early pioneers promoted the Net as a revolution in human communication, America has instead become a society of desk-bound introverts who believe everything they read. The federal government has been "bought" by a Microsoft-style corporation. Any semblance of central authority has vanished. As the Net infiltrates India and Pakistan, fevered nationalists and terrorists find one more medium through which to spread the word.

With Killing Time, Caleb Carr (The Alienist, The Angel of Darkness) manages to create a future that's both frightening and nostalgic. The novel's narrator, Dr. Gideon Wolfe, longs for a world before technology swallowed people's minds and imaginations. Through a series of complex misadventures, beginning with the murder of his best friend, Gideon finds himself joining a ragtag army of scientists and inventors who hope to take it back. Heading up this '60s-style revolutionary cell is a brother-sister team--genetically engineered geniuses with silver hair and shining eyes. Aboard their ultramodern ship, Gideon learns the extent of the damage done. When they dive below the surface of the Atlantic, he looks out the window and sees

not an idyllic scene of aquatic wonder such as childhood stories might have led me to expect but rather a horrifying expanse of brown water filled with human and animal waste, all of it endlessly roiled but never cleansed by the steady pulse of the offshore currents.
Carr's future is suffused with regret. It's also rife with mystery and suspense; in every chapter the stakes are raised a little higher, the apocalypse hovers a little closer. This author is a master of the cliffhanger, of cryptic warnings that return to haunt our hero later in the text. Occasional flashes of humor relieve the prevailing ominousness, and a beautiful girl with a huge gun appears at regular intervals to keep things humming. Fans of Steve Erickson's end-of-the-world novels will likely enjoy this adventure in the Internet age, where the sheer amount of information has induced not quantitative changes in the human psyche, but qualitative ones. --Ellen Williams

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:14:46 -0400)

(see all 7 descriptions)

Dr. Gideon Wolfe, a renowned criminologist and professor at New York's John Jay University, is hired by the widow of a murdered special-effects wizard to track down her husband's killer.

(summary from another edition)

» see all 7 descriptions

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