HomeGroupsTalkZeitgeist
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Before We Were Free by Julia Alvarez
Loading...

Before We Were Free

by Julia Alvarez

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
6353315,256 (4.05)8

None.

None
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 8 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 33 (next | show all)
I recommend this book because, it has a unique plotline, and is full of interesting characters and settings. The book kept me turning pages, because it was addicting and the events were fascinating throughout the story. This book is full of suspense, making me turn the pages to see what happened next. I relate to the character Anita, because just like her I am sort of caring for my family and my friends. Just like her, I am also at times childish, and am very clueless of my surroundings. The plot was suspenseful, and had new unexpected events constantly, which kept me on my toes too see the outcomes. The theme was well developed, because it is not super cliched, like other stories. I personally responded to this book with a sort of sad feeling. This book is full of sad events, that make you think about how you would feel. Especially because the main character Anita, was around my age. I learned from this book, that you should always be brave, and stand up for your anything that you don’t believe is right. This changed the way that I thought about history, and how cruel dictatorship was. All that power in one person's hands, is too much to account for. ( )
  Sluper1 | Apr 12, 2015 |
BBYA 2002; RGG: Important story of a family's experience opposing the Trujillo dictatorship in 1960's Dominican Republic. Told from the point of view of a twelve-year-old girl, who ends up in hiding. Prose seems a bit stilted.
  rgruberexcel | Mar 26, 2015 |
BBYA 2002; RGG: Important story of a family's experience opposing the Trujillo dictatorship in 1960's Dominican Republic. Told from the point of view of a twelve-year-old girl, who ends up in hiding. Prose seems a bit stilted.
  rgruberexcel | Mar 26, 2015 |
Alvarez readers, see question below spoiler alert:

I thought that Before We Were Free ended with a chapter in Chucha's voice, but I got to the end and it was all Anita's voice. Is there a different Alvarez novel that ends with Chucha's point-of-view or am I simply misremembering? ( )
  VikkiLaw | Apr 4, 2013 |
multicultural
  janetguzman | Dec 12, 2012 |
Showing 1-5 of 33 (next | show all)
no reviews | add a review
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Series (with order)
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
for those who stayed
First words
"May I have some volunteers?" Mrs. Brown is saying.
Quotations
Last words
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Publisher series
Original language

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English (1)

Book description
Haiku summary

Amazon.com Amazon.com Review (ISBN 044023784X, Mass Market Paperback)

What would life be like for a teen living under a dictatorship? Afraid to go to school or to talk freely? Knowing that, at the least suspicion, the secret police could invade your house, even search and destroy your private treasures? Or worse, that your father or uncles or brothers could be suddenly taken away to be jailed or tortured or killed? Such experiences have been all too common in the many Latin American dictatorships of the last 50 years. Author Julia Alvarez (How the Garcia Girls Lost Their Accents) and her family escaped from the Trujillo regime in the Dominican Republic when she was 10, but in Before We Were Free she imagines, through the stories of her cousins and friends, how it was for those who stayed behind.

Twelve-year-old Anita de la Torre is too involved with her own life to be more than dimly aware of the growing menace all around her, until her last cousins and uncles and aunts have fled to America and a fleet of black Volkswagens comes up the drive, bringing the secret police to the family compound to search their houses. Gradually, through overheard conversations and the explanations of her older sister, Lucinda, she comes to understand that her father and uncles are involved in a plot to kill El Jefe, the dictator, and that they are all in deadly peril. Anita's story is universal in its implications--she even keeps an Anne Frank-like diary when she and her mother must hide in a friend's house--and a tribute to those brave souls who feel, like Anita's father, that "life without freedom is no life at all." (Ages 10 to 14) --Patty Campbell

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:11:03 -0400)

(see all 5 descriptions)

In the early 1960s in the Dominican Republic, twelve-year-old Anita learns that her family is involved in the underground movement to end the bloody rule of the dictator, General Trujillo.

» see all 4 descriptions

Quick Links

Swap Ebooks Audio
5 avail.
12 wanted
4 pay4 pay

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (4.05)
0.5
1
1.5 2
2 3
2.5 1
3 24
3.5 4
4 51
4.5 4
5 43

Audible.com

2 editions of this book were published by Audible.com.

See editions

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

Help/FAQs | About | Privacy/Terms | Blog | Store | Contact | LibraryThing.com | APIs | WikiThing | Common Knowledge | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | 97,941,735 books! | Top bar: Always visible